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VIGS, HIGS and FIGS: small RNA silencing in the interactions of viruses or filamentous organisms with their plant hosts

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Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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Nature Plants: Elicitin recognition confers enhanced resistance to Phytophthora infestans in potato (2015)

Nature Plants: Elicitin recognition confers enhanced resistance to Phytophthora infestans in potato (2015) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

Potato late blight, caused by the destructive Irish famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a major threat to global food security1,2. All late blight resistance genes identified to date belong to the coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat class of intracellular immune receptors3. However, virulent races of the pathogen quickly evolved to evade recognition by these cytoplasmic immune receptors4. Here we demonstrate that the receptor-like protein ELR (elicitin response) from the wild potato Solanum microdontum mediates extracellular recognition of the elicitin domain, a molecular pattern that is conserved in Phytophthora species. ELR associates with the immune co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 and mediates broad-spectrum recognition of elicitin proteins from several Phytophthora species, including four diverse elicitins from P. infestans. Transfer of ELR into cultivated potato resulted in enhanced resistance to P. infestans. Pyramiding cell surface pattern recognition receptors with intracellular immune receptors could maximize the potential of generating a broader and potentially more durable resistance to this devastating plant pathogen.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Plant-mediated gene silencing restricts growth of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans

Plant-mediated gene silencing restricts growth of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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Host induced gene silencing targeting P. Infestans

 

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PLOS Pathogens: Generators of Phenotypic Diversity in the Evolution of Pathogenic Microorganisms (2013)

PLOS Pathogens: Generators of Phenotypic Diversity in the Evolution of Pathogenic Microorganisms (2013) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

All organisms run the gauntlet of Darwinian selection. Poignant examples include microbial pathogens, which must survive and thrive in their hosts. The process of pathogen adaptation to the host is diverse and is now known to involve a panoply of diversity generators, such as sexual/parasexual reproduction, aneuploidy, prions, mutators, telomeric silencing/recombination, and Hsp90 as a capacitor for evolution. Given the vast diversity of known mechanisms that can generate phenotypic and genotypic assortments, others likely remain to be discovered.


Via Niklaus Grunwald, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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PLOS Pathogens: Ustilago maydis: Dissecting the Molecular Interface between Pathogen and Plant (2012)

PLOS Pathogens: Ustilago maydis: Dissecting the Molecular Interface between Pathogen and Plant (2012) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

Fungal diseases of plants represent one of the most eminent threats to agriculture. Given the food needs of a growing world population and that more and more crops are devoted to fuel production, the necessity to develop crops with better resistance to disease is increasing. To accomplish this, the mechanisms that plant pathogenic fungi use to colonize plants need to be elucidated. As of now, there are only few examples/models in which this can be done on a functional, genome-wide level, taking into account both the pathogen and its host plant. The fungus Ustilago maydis (U. maydis) is one of these examples. It is a member of the smut fungi: a large group of parasites infecting mostly grasses, including several important crop plants such as maize (Figure 1B), wheat, barley, and sugar cane. Smut fungi are biotrophs, i.e., parasites that need the living host plant to complete their sexual life cycle. They do not establish prominent feeding structures like the related, haustoria-forming rust fungi. During penetration, the host plasma membrane invaginates and completely encases the intracellular hyphae (Figure 1A), establishing an extended interaction zone mediating the exchange of molecules between fungus and host. In contrast to most smut fungi that cause a systemic infection, remaining symptomless until the plant flowers, U. maydis can infect all above-ground parts of the maize plant but fails to spread systemically. U. maydis induces local tumors in which spores develop (Figure 1B) – a unique feature that allows detection of symptoms in corn seedlings less than a week after syringe infection with high levels of inoculum. This, together with the toolbox developed for reverse genetics, cell biology, and functional studies, has contributed to its status as a model for biotrophic basidiomycete fungi. Here the current level of our understanding of the elaborate molecular crosstalk between U. maydis and its host plant will be discussed.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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PLOS ONE: Decay of Genes Encoding the Oomycete Flagellar Proteome in the Downy Mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

PLOS ONE: Decay of Genes Encoding the Oomycete Flagellar Proteome in the Downy Mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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A root-knot nematode-secreted protein is injected into giant cells and targeted to the nuclei. New Phytol (2012)

A root-knot nematode-secreted protein is injected into giant cells and targeted to the nuclei. New Phytol (2012) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

• Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) are obligate endoparasites that maintain a biotrophic relationship with their hosts over a period of several weeks and induce the differentiation of root cells into specialized feeding cells. Nematode effectors synthesized in the oesophageal glands and injected into the plant tissue through the syringe-like stylet certainly play a central role in these processes.
• In a search for nematode effectors, we used comparative genomics on expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets to identify Meloidogyne incognita genes encoding proteins potentially secreted upon the early steps of infection.
• We identified three genes specifically expressed in the oesophageal glands of parasitic juveniles that encode predicted secreted proteins. One of these genes, Mi-EFF1 is a pioneer gene that has no similarity in databases and a predicted nuclear localization signal. We demonstrate that RKNs secrete Mi-EFF1 within the feeding site and show Mi-EFF1 targeting to the nuclei of the feeding cells.
• RKNs were previously shown to secrete proteins in the apoplasm of infected tissues. Our results show that nematodes sedentarily established at the feeding site also deliver proteins within plant cells through their stylet. The protein Mi-EFF1 injected within the feeding cells is targeted at the nuclei where it may manipulate nuclear functions of the host cell.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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PLOS Pathogens: Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen (2012)

PLOS Pathogens: Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen (2012) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

Pest and pathogen losses jeopardise global food security and ever since the 19th century Irish famine, potato late blight has exemplified this threat. The causal oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, undergoes major population shifts in agricultural systems via the successive emergence and migration of asexual lineages. The phenotypic and genotypic bases of these selective sweeps are largely unknown but management strategies need to adapt to reflect the changing pathogen population. Here, we used molecular markers to document the emergence of a lineage, termed 13_A2, in the European P. infestans population, and its rapid displacement of other lineages to exceed 75% of the pathogen population across Great Britain in less than three years. We show that isolates of the 13_A2 lineage are among the most aggressive on cultivated potatoes, outcompete other aggressive lineages in the field, and overcome previously effective forms of plant host resistance. Genome analyses of a 13_A2 isolate revealed extensive genetic and expression polymorphisms particularly in effector genes. Copy number variations, gene gains and losses, amino-acid replacements and changes in expression patterns of disease effector genes within the 13_A2 isolate likely contribute to enhanced virulence and aggressiveness to drive this population displacement. Importantly, 13_A2 isolates carry intact and in planta induced Avrblb1, Avrblb2 and Avrvnt1 effector genes that trigger resistance in potato lines carrying the corresponding R immune receptor genes Rpi-blb1, Rpi-blb2, and Rpi-vnt1.1. These findings point towards a strategy for deploying genetic resistance to mitigate the impact of the 13_A2 lineage and illustrate how pathogen population monitoring, combined with genome analysis, informs the management of devastating disease epidemics.


Via Nicolas Denancé, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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ScienceDirect.com - Fungal Biology - Viability of fastidious Phytophthora following different cryopreservation treatments

ScienceDirect.com - Fungal Biology - Viability of fastidious Phytophthora following different cryopreservation treatments | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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JBC: The avirulence protein 3a (AVR3a) from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans, forms homodimers through its predicted translocation region and does not specifically bind phospholipids (2012)

JBC: The avirulence protein 3a (AVR3a) from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans, forms homodimers through its predicted translocation region and does not specifically bind phospholipids (2012) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

The translocation mechanism of RxLR effectors from plant pathogenic oomycetes into the cytoplasm of their host is currently the object of intense research activity and debate. Here we report the biochemical and thermodynamic characterisation of the Phytophthora infestans effector AVR3a in vitro. We show that the amino acids surrounding the RxLR leader mediate homodimerisation of the protein. Dimerisation was considerably attenuated by a localised mutation within the RxLR motif that was previously described to prevent translocation of the protein into host. Importantly, we confirm that the reported phospholipid binding properties of AVR3a are mediated by its C-terminal effector domain, and not its RxLR leader. However, we show that the observed phospholipid interaction is attributable to a weak association with small amounts of denatured protein, and is therefore most likely physiologically irrelevant.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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ScienceDirect.com - Fungal Biology - Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element

ScienceDirect.com - Fungal Biology - Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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Trends in Plant Science (2012): Catch me if you can: bacterial effectors and plant targets

Trends in Plant Science (2012): Catch me if you can: bacterial effectors and plant targets | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

To suppress plant defense responses and favor the establishment of disease, phytopathogenic bacteria have gained the ability to deliver effector molecules inside host cells through the type III secretion system. Inside plant cells, bacterial effector proteins may be addressed to different subcellular compartments where they are able to manipulate a variety of host cellular components and molecular functions. Here we review how the recent identification and functional characterization of plant components targeted by bacterial effectors, as well as the discovery of new pathogen recognition capabilities evolved in turn by plant cells, have significantly contributed to further our knowledge about the intricate molecular interactions that are established between plants and their invading bacteria.

 

Laurent Deslandes and Susana Rivas


Via Nicolas Denancé, Suayib Üstün
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BMC Genomics | Full text | Transcriptome dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana root penetration by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora parasitica

Oomycetes are a group of filamentous microorganisms that includes both animal and plant pathogens and causes major agricultural losses. Phytophthora species can infect most crops and plants from natural ecosystems.

Via Christophe Jacquet, Nari Williams
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Journal of Integrative Plant Biology: Viroids: Small Probes for Exploring the Vast Universe of RNA Trafficking in Plants (2010)

Journal of Integrative Plant Biology: Viroids: Small Probes for Exploring the Vast Universe of RNA Trafficking in Plants (2010) | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

Cell-to-cell and long-distance trafficking of RNA is a rapidly evolving frontier of integrative plant biology that broadly impacts studies on plant growth and development, spread of infectious agents and plant defense responses. The fundamental questions being pursued at the forefronts revolve around function, mechanism and evolution. In the present review, we will first use specific examples to illustrate the biological importance of cell-to-cell and long-distance trafficking of RNA. We then focus our discussion on research findings obtained using viroids that have advanced our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in RNA trafficking. We further use viroid examples to illustrate the great diversity of trafficking machinery evolved by plants, as well as the promise for new insights in the years ahead. Finally, we discuss the prospect of integrating findings from different experimental systems to achieve a systems-based understanding of RNA trafficking function, mechanism and evolution.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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BMC Microbiology | Full text | Fragmentation of tRNA in Phytophthora infestans asexual life cycle stages and during host plant infection

The oomycete Phytophthora infestans possesses active RNA silencing pathways, which presumably enable this plant pathogen to control the large numbers of transposable elements present in its 240 Mb genome. Small RNAs (sRNAs), central molecules in RNA silencing, are known to also play key roles in this organism, notably in regulation of critical effector genes needed for infection of its potato host.
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more sRNAs, this time about tRNAs.

 

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Phenotypic diversification by gene silencing in Phytophthora plant pathogens

Phenotypic diversification by gene silencing in Phytophthora plant pathogens | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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Video Lecture: Small RNA, The Dark Matter of Genetics - by Professor Sir David Baulcombe

Sir David Baulcombe is one of the world's top scientists whose work identified small RNAs, and he's a nice person as well. He will be a Kenote Speaker at the upcoming UK Plant Sciences Federation meeting in Dundee, Scotland, April 2013, which is sure to be a stimulating meeting http://www.plantsci2013.org.uk/programme/


Via Mary Williams
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ScienceDirect.com - Current Opinion in Plant Biology - Plants and pathogens: putting infection strategies and defence mechanisms on the map

ScienceDirect.com - Current Opinion in Plant Biology - Plants and pathogens: putting infection strategies and defence mechanisms on the map | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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BMC Genomics | Full text | RefGenes: identification of reliable and condition specific reference genes for RT-qPCR data normalization

RT-qPCR is a sensitive and increasingly used method for gene expression quantification. To normalize RT-qPCR measurements between samples, most laboratories use endogenous reference genes as internal controls.
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YouTube: Phytophthora plurivora zoospores attracted to Beech root exudates (2012)

During my PhD I have worked with Phytophthora species, which are very aggressive microorganisms that infect plants, causing huge economic and environmental losses. Commonly Phytophthora species spread and infect plants via zoospores, a motile asexual structure that uses a flagelum for locomotion. The zoospores can "sense" and swim towards plants signals starting an infection.


In this video I tested the attraction of P. plurivora zoospores to root exudates of European beech. The major decline of beech trees in forests worldwide has been associated with P. plurivora-caused disease. In the video you see a microscopy view of two pipette tips filled with water or root exudates. The pipettes were embedded in a zoospores suspension. Clearly the zoospores were more attracted to the root exudates than water.


More information about Phytophthora: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora


Phytophthora plurivora: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_plurivora


European beech: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fagus_sylvatica


Song: Mozart - Symphony No. 41 in C, K. 551 (Jupiter)


Follow the Phytophthora on twitter: https://twitter.com/thePhytophthora


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Mary Williams
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PLOS Pathogens: Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen

PLOS Pathogens: Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
From molecules to physiology...
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Evidence for involvement of Dicer-like, Argonaute and histone deacetylase proteins in gene silencing in Phytophthora infestans - VETUKURI - 2011 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library

Evidence for involvement of Dicer-like, Argonaute and histone deacetylase proteins in gene silencing in Phytophthora infestans - VETUKURI - 2011 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it
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Trends in Plant Science - Benefits of brassinosteroid crosstalk

Trends in Plant Science - Benefits of brassinosteroid crosstalk | Plant Microbe interactions1 | Scoop.it

Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a group of phytohormones that regulate various biological processes in plants. Interactions and crosstalk between BRs and other plant hormones control a broad spectrum of physiological and developmental processes. In this review, we examine recent findings which indicate that BR signaling components mainly interact with the signaling elements of other hormones at the transcriptional level. Our major challenge is to understand how BR signaling independently, or in conjunction with other hormones, controls different BR-regulated activities. The application of a range of biotechnological strategies based on the modulation of BR content and its interplay with other plant growth regulators (PGRs) could provide a unique tool for the genetic improvement of crop productivity in a sustainable manner.


Via Guogen Yang, Suayib Üstün
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