Plant-Microbe Interaction
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Frontiers | The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity | Plant Biotic Interactions

Frontiers | The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity | Plant Biotic Interactions | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
The fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (L. maculans) is the causal agent of blackleg disease of canola/oilseed rape (Brassica napus) worldwide. We previously reported cloning of the B. napus blackleg resistance gene, LepR3, which encodes a receptor-like protein. LepR3 triggers localized cell death upon recognition of its cognate Avr protein, AvrLm1. Here, we exploited the Nicotiana benthamiana model plant to investigate the recognition mechanism of AvrLm1 by LepR3. Co-expression of the LepR3/AvrLm1 gene pair in N. benthamiana resulted in development of a hypersensitive response (HR). However, a truncated AvrLm1 lacking its indigenous signal peptide was compromised in its ability to induce LepR3-mediated HR, indicating that AvrLm1 is perceived by LepR3 extracellularly. Structure-function analysis of the AvrLm1 protein revealed that the C-terminal region of AvrLm1 was required for LepR3-mediated HR in N. benthamiana and for resistance to L. maculans in B. napus. LepR3 was shown to be physically interacting with the B. napus receptor like kinase, SOBIR1 (BnSOBIR1). Silencing of NbSOBIR1 or NbSERK3 (BAK1) compromised LepR3-AvrLm1-dependent HR in N. benthamiana, suggesting that LepR3-mediated resistance to L. maculans in B. napus requires SOBIR1 and BAK1/SERK3. Using this model system, we determined that BnSOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1 are essential partners in the LepR3 signaling complex and were able to define the AvrLm1 effector domain.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plants and Microbes
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Plant Cell: Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae (2015)

Plant Cell: Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae (2015) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most devastating disease of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and a continuing threat to global food security. To cause disease, the fungus elaborates a specialized infection cell called an appressorium, which breaches the cuticle of the rice leaf, allowing the fungus entry to plant tissue. Here, we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the tips of growing hyphae during vegetative growth, ahead of the Spitzenkörper, and is required for polarized exocytosis. However, during infection-related development, the exocyst specifically assembles in the appressorium at the point of plant infection. The exocyst components Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, and Sec15, and exocyst complex proteins Exo70 and Exo84 localize specifically in a ring formation at the appressorium pore. Targeted gene deletion, or conditional mutation, of genes encoding exocyst components leads to impaired plant infection. We demonstrate that organization of the exocyst complex at the appressorium pore is a septin-dependent process, which also requires regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the NoxR-dependent Nox2 NADPH oxidase complex. We conclude that septin-mediated assembly of the exocyst is necessary for appressorium repolarization and host cell invasion.


Via The Sainsbury Lab, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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The Sainsbury Lab's curator insight, November 14, 2015 6:06 AM

Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most devastating disease of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and a continuing threat to global food security. To cause disease, the fungus elaborates a specialized infection cell called an appressorium, which breaches the cuticle of the rice leaf, allowing the fungus entry to plant tissue. Here, we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the tips of growing hyphae during vegetative growth, ahead of the Spitzenkörper, and is required for polarized exocytosis. However, during infection-related development, the exocyst specifically assembles in the appressorium at the point of plant infection. The exocyst components Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, and Sec15, and exocyst complex proteins Exo70 and Exo84 localize specifically in a ring formation at the appressorium pore. Targeted gene deletion, or conditional mutation, of genes encoding exocyst components leads to impaired plant infection. We demonstrate that organization of the exocyst complex at the appressorium pore is a septin-dependent process, which also requires regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the NoxR-dependent Nox2 NADPH oxidase complex. We conclude that septin-mediated assembly of the exocyst is necessary for appressorium repolarization and host cell invasion.

Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Jasmonate in plant defence: sentinel or double agent? - Plant Biotechnology Journal -

Jasmonate in plant defence: sentinel or double agent? - Plant Biotechnology Journal - | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Plants and their biotic enemies, such as microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects, are engaged in a desperate battle which would determine their survival–death fate. Plants have evolved efficient and sophisticated systems to defend against such attackers. In recent years, significant progress has been made towards a comprehensive understanding of inducible defence system mediated by jasmonate (JA), a vital plant hormone essential for plant defence responses and developmental processes. This review presents an overview of JA action in plant defences and discusses how microbial pathogens evade plant defence system through hijacking the JA pathway.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Autophagy in Plants – What's New on the Menu?: Trends in Plant Science

Autophagy in Plants – What's New on the Menu?: Trends in Plant Science | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Autophagy is a major cellular degradation pathway in eukaryotes. Recent studies have revealed the importance of autophagy in many aspects of plant life, including seedling establishment, plant development, stress resistance, metabolism, and reproduction. This is manifested by the dual ability of autophagy to execute bulk degradation under severe environmental conditions, while simultaneously to be highly selective in targeting specific compartments and protein complexes to regulate key cellular processes, even during favorable growth conditions. Delivery of cellular components to the vacuole enables their recycling, affecting the plant metabolome, especially under stress. Recent research in Arabidopsis has further unveiled fundamental mechanistic aspects in autophagy which may have relevance in non-plant systems. We review the most recent discoveries concerning autophagy in plants, touching upon all these aspects.
Trends

Autophagy is involved in almost every aspect of plant life, including germination, seedling establishment, development, reproduction, metabolism, and stress tolerance.

Proteins that are involved in fundamental processes of autophagy, such as autophagosome biogenesis, were recently characterized in plants.

Autophagy is intimately associated with other intracellular trafficking pathways.

Several selective autophagy pathways were recently identified in Arabidopsis; most are common to all eukaryotes. Nevertheless, some pathways were initially discovered in plants and others are plant-specific.

As an intracellular recycling system, autophagy is highly important for proper plant metabolism and nutrient allocation, both during stress and favorable growth conditions.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Tomatoes taste good because we slowed down their internal clocks

Tomatoes taste good because we slowed down their internal clocks | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Domestication accidentally created a plant that thrives in long summer days.

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:31 AM

This is a summary of a new paper out in Nature Genetics, "Domestication selected for deceleration of the circadian clock in cultivated tomato"

http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.3447.html

Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
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Rj4, a Gene Controlling Nodulation Specificity in Soybeans, Encodes a Thaumatin-Like Protein, but Not the One Previously Reported

Rj4 is a dominant gene in soybeans that restricts nodulation by many strains of Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The soybean-B. elkanii symbiosis has a low nitrogen-fixation efficiency, but B. elkanii strains are highly competitive for nodulation; thus cultivars harboring an Rj4 allele are considered favorable. Cloning the Rj4 gene is the first step in understanding the molecular basis of Rj4-mediated nodulation restriction and facilitates the development of molecular tools for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation in soybeans. We finely mapped the Rj4 locus within a small genomic region on soybean chromosome 1, and validated one of the candidate genes as Rj4 using both complementation tests and CRISPR/Cas9-based gene knockout experiments. We demonstrated that Rj4 encodes a thaumatin-like protein, for which a corresponding allele is not present in the surveyed rj4 genotypes, including the reference genome Williams 82. Our conclusion disagrees with the previous report that Rj4 is the Glyma.01G165800 gene (previously annotated as Glyma01g37060). Instead, we provide convincing evidence that Rj4 is Glyma.01g165800-D, a duplicated and unique version of Glyma.01g165800, that has evolved the ability to control symbiotic specificity.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Deep sequencing of the Medicago truncatula root transcriptome reveals a massive and early interaction between Nod factor and ethylene signals

Deep sequencing of the Medicago truncatula root transcriptome reveals a massive and early interaction between Nod factor and ethylene signals | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
The legume-rhizobium symbiosis is initiated through activation of the Nod factor-signaling cascade, leading to a rapid reprogramming of host cell developmental pathways. In this work we combine transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) with molecular genetics and network analysis to quantify and categorize the transcriptional changes occurring in roots of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) from minutes to days after inoculation with Sinorhizobium medicae. To identify the nature of the inductive and regulatory cues, we employed mutants with absent or decreased Nod factor sensitivities (nfp and lyk3, respectively) and an ethylene (ET)-insensitive, Nod factor hypersensitive mutant (skl). This unique dataset encompasses nine time points allowing observation of the symbiotic regulation of diverse biological processes with high temporal resolution. Among the many outputs of the study is the early Nod factor-induced, ET-regulated expression of ET signaling and biosynthesis genes. These results suggest that Nod factor signaling activates ET production to attenuate its own signal. Promoter:GUS fusions report ET biosynthesis both in root hairs responding to rhizobium as well as in meristematic tissue during nodule organogenesis and growth, indicating that ET signaling functions at multiple developmental stages during symbiosis. In addition, we identified thousands of novel candidate genes undergoing a Nod-factor dependent, ET-regulated expression. We leveraged the power of this large dataset to model Nod factor and ET-regulated signaling networks using MERLIN, a regulator network inference algorithm. These analyses predict key nodes regulating the biological process impacted by Nod factor perception. We have made these results available to the research community through a searchable online resource.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Common foliar fungi of Populus trichocarpa modify Melampsora rust disease severity

Common foliar fungi of Populus trichocarpa modify Melampsora rust disease severity | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Nonpathogenic foliar fungi (i.e. endophytes and epiphytes) can modify plant disease severity in controlled experiments. However, experiments have not been combined with ecological studies in wild plant pathosystems to determine whether disease-modifying fungi are common enough to be ecologically important.We used culture-based methods and DNA sequencing to characterize the abundance and distribution of foliar fungi of Populus trichocarpa in wild populations across its native range (Pacific Northwest, USA). We conducted complementary, manipulative experiments to test how foliar fungi commonly isolated from those populations influence the severity of Melampsora leaf rust disease. Finally, we examined correlative relationships between the abundance of disease-modifying foliar fungi and disease severity in wild trees.A taxonomically and geographically diverse group of common foliar fungi significantly modified disease severity in experiments, either increasing or decreasing disease severity. Spatial patterns in the abundance of some of these foliar fungi were significantly correlated (in predicted directions) with disease severity in wild trees.Our study reveals that disease modification is an ecological function shared by common foliar fungal symbionts of P. trichocarpa. This finding raises new questions about plant disease ecology and plant biodiversity, and has applied potential for disease management.

Via Francis Martin
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Genome Biology | Full text | Boosting plant immunity with CRISPR/Cas

Genome Biology | Full text | Boosting plant immunity with CRISPR/Cas | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
CRISPR/Cas has recently been transferred to plants to make them resistant to geminiviruses, a damaging family of DNA viruses. We discuss the potential and the limitations of this method.

 

Research Highlight

Geminiviridae are a family of DNA viruses that infect a diversity of plants. These insect-transmitted viruses can cause destructive diseases in crop plants and have been described as a curse to food security. Until now, limited progress has been made with developing crop varieties resistant to geminiviruses. In the current issue of Genome Biology, Ali et al. [1] report on a new strategy towards improving plant resistance to geminiviruses using the bacterial CRISPR/Cas system.

 

Problematic development of geminivirus-resistant crops

Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses with genomes of about 3 kb that carry few transcription units and rely on the host machinery to function [2]. Once inside the plant cell, the virus starts its cycle of DNA replication and accumulation followed by virus assembly and movement [2]. Strategies to control geminiviruses include chemicals to limit insect vector populations, RNA interference, expression of mutated or truncated viral proteins, expression of peptide aptamers that bind viral proteins, and conventional breeding of resistant crop cultivars


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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from WU_Phyto-Publications
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PLOS Pathogens (2015): Worse Comes to Worst: Bananas and Panama Disease—When Plant and Pathogen Clones Meet

PLOS Pathogens (2015): Worse Comes to Worst: Bananas and Panama Disease—When Plant and Pathogen Clones Meet | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

The banana is the most popular fruit in the world and ranks among the top ten food commodities for Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Notably, the crop is largely produced by small-holder farmers, with around 85% of the global production destined for local markets and only 15% entering international trade. Bananas evolved in the Indo-Malayan archipelago thousands of years ago. The majority of all edible varieties developed from specific (inter- and intra-) hybridizations of two seeded diploid Musa species (M. acuminata and M. balbisiana) and subsequent selection of diploid and triploid seedless clones. Despite rich genetic and phenotypic diversity, only a few clones developed, over time, into global commodities—either as dessert bananas, such as the triploid “Cavendish” clones, or as important staple foods such as cooking bananas and plantains. Currently, bananas are widely grown in the (sub)tropics and are consumed in nearly all countries around the world, providing crucial nutrition for millions of people. Edible bananas reproduce asexually through rhizomes, but since the early 1970s, tissue culture has enabled mass production of cultivars. This facilitates the rapid rollout of genetically identical plants, which have consumer-preferred traits and outstanding agronomical performance, onto vast acreages around the world. However, the typical vulnerability of monocultures to diseases has taken its toll on banana production over the last century. In 1876, a wilting disease of banana was reported in Australia, and in 1890, it was observed in the “Gros Michel” plantation crops of Costa Rica and Panama. There it developed major epidemics in the 1900s that are among the worst in agricultural history, linking its most prone geographical area to its colloquial name: Panama disease. It was only in 1910 that the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (Foc) was identified as the causal agent in Cuba, from which the name of the forma specialis was derived.


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Plant Cell: Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae (2015)

Plant Cell: Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae (2015) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Via The Sainsbury Lab, CP, hunter chen, Elsa Ballini
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The Sainsbury Lab's curator insight, November 14, 2015 6:06 AM

Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most devastating disease of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and a continuing threat to global food security. To cause disease, the fungus elaborates a specialized infection cell called an appressorium, which breaches the cuticle of the rice leaf, allowing the fungus entry to plant tissue. Here, we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the tips of growing hyphae during vegetative growth, ahead of the Spitzenkörper, and is required for polarized exocytosis. However, during infection-related development, the exocyst specifically assembles in the appressorium at the point of plant infection. The exocyst components Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, and Sec15, and exocyst complex proteins Exo70 and Exo84 localize specifically in a ring formation at the appressorium pore. Targeted gene deletion, or conditional mutation, of genes encoding exocyst components leads to impaired plant infection. We demonstrate that organization of the exocyst complex at the appressorium pore is a septin-dependent process, which also requires regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the NoxR-dependent Nox2 NADPH oxidase complex. We conclude that septin-mediated assembly of the exocyst is necessary for appressorium repolarization and host cell invasion.

Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000

Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Novel aspects of hydrophobins in wheat isolate of Magnaporthe oryzae: Mpg1, but not Mhp1, is essential for adhesion and pathogenicity

Novel aspects of hydrophobins in wheat isolate of Magnaporthe oryzae: Mpg1, but not Mhp1, is essential for adhesion and pathogenicity | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
The adhesive ability of spores is important for fungal pathogens to manifest pathogenicity. Hydrophobins found on the outer surface of conidia and hyphae may be involved in adhesion or communication between the fungus and its environment. The effects of two hydrophobins, class I Mpg1 and class II Mhp1, on adhesion, germling differentiation, and pathogenicity of a wheat isolate of Magnaporthe oryzae were evaluated. We conducted gene knockdown or knockout experiments to obtain hydrophobin mutants. We found several discrepancies from previous studies. The Mpg1-silenced mutants had various levels of Mpg1 transcription, and Mpg1 expression was correlated with adhesion, germling differentiation, and pathogenicity. We also obtained mhp1 null mutants that had full pathogenicity on wheat and barley leaves. These results suggest that Mpg1 is directly contributing to adhesion, but Mhp1 is not essential for the infection process in the wheat isolate of M. oryzae.

Via Elsa Ballini
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Publications
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New Phytologist: Helper NLR proteins NRC2a/b and NRC3 but not NRC1 are required for Pto-mediated cell death and resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana (2015)

New Phytologist: Helper NLR proteins NRC2a/b and NRC3 but not NRC1 are required for Pto-mediated cell death and resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana (2015) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Plants defend against pathogens using both cell surface and intracellular immune receptors (Dodds & Rathjen, 2010; Win et al., 2012). Plant cell surface receptors include receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs), which respond to pathogen-derived apoplastic molecules (Boller & Felix, 2009; Thomma et al., 2011). By contrast, plant intracellular immune receptors are typically nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR or NLR) proteins, which respond to translocated effectors from a diversity of pathogens (Eitas & Dangl, 2010; Bonardi et al., 2012). These receptors engage in microbial perception either by directly binding pathogen molecules or indirectly by sensing pathogen-induced perturbations (Win et al., 2012). However, signaling events downstream of pathogen recognition remain poorly understood.


In addition to their role in microbial recognition, some NLR proteins contribute to signal transduction and/or amplification (Gabriels et al., 2007; Bonardi et al., 2011; Cesari et al., 2014). An emerging model is that NLR proteins often function in pairs, with ‘helper’ proteins required for the activity of ‘sensors’ that mediate pathogen recognition (Bonardi et al., 2011, 2012). Among previously reported NLR helpers, NRC1 (NB-LRR protein required for hypersensitive-response (HR)-associated cell death 1) stands out for having been reported as a signaling hub required for the cell death mediated by both cell surface immune receptors such as Cf-4, Cf-9, Ve1 and LeEix2, as well as intracellular immune receptors, namely Pto, Rx and Mi-1.2 (Gabriels et al., 2006, 2007; Sueldo, 2014; Sueldo et al., 2015). However, these studies did not take into account the Nicotiana benthamiana genome sequence, and it remains questionable whether NRC1 is indeed required for the reported phenotypes.


Functional analyses of NRC1 were performed using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) (Gabriels et al., 2007), a method that is popular for genetic analyses in several plant systems, particularly the model solanaceous plant N. benthamiana (Burch-Smith et al., 2004). However, interpretation of VIGS can be problematic as the experiment can result in off-target silencing (Senthil-Kumar & Mysore, 2011). In addition, heterologous gene fragments from other species (e.g. tomato) have been frequently used to silence homologs in N. benthamiana, particularly in studies that predate the sequencing of the N. benthamiana genome (Burton et al., 2000; Liu et al., 2002b; Lee et al., 2003; Gabriels et al., 2006, 2007; Senthil-Kumar et al., 2007; Oh et al., 2010). In the NRC1 study, a fragment of a tomato gene corresponding to the LRR domain was used for silencing in N. benthamiana (Gabriels et al., 2007). Given that a draft genome sequence of N. benthamiana has been generated (Bombarely et al., 2012) and silencing prediction tools have become available (Fernandez-Pozo et al., 2015), we can now design better VIGS experiments and revisit previously published studies.


Two questions arise about the NRC1 study. First, is there a NRC1 ortholog in N. benthamiana? Second, are the reported phenotypes caused by silencing of NRC1 in N. benthamiana? In this study, we investigated NRC1-like genes in solanaceous plants using a combination of genome annotation, phylogenetics, gene silencing and genetic complementation experiments. We discovered three paralogs of NRC1, which we termed NRC2a, NRC2b and NRC3, are required for hypersensitive cell death and resistance mediated by Pto, but are not essential for the cell death triggered by Rx and Mi-1.2. NRC2a/b and NRC3 weakly contribute to the hypersensitive cell death triggered by Cf-4. Our results highlight the importance of applying genetic complementation assays to validate gene function in RNA silencing experiments.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Identification of TTAGGG-binding proteins in Neurospora crassa, a fungus with vertebrate-like telomere repeats

Identification of TTAGGG-binding proteins in Neurospora crassa, a fungus with vertebrate-like telomere repeats | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Background. To date, telomere research in fungi has mainly focused on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the fact that both yeasts have degenerated telomeric repeats in contrast to the canonical TTAGGG motif found in vertebrates and also several other fungi.

 

Results. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we here investigate the telosome of Neurospora crassa, a fungus with canonical telomeric repeats. We show that at least six of the candidates detected in our screen are direct TTAGGG-repeat binding proteins. While three of the direct interactors (NCU03416 [ncTbf1], NCU01991 [ncTbf2] and NCU02182 [ncTay1]) feature the known myb/homeobox DNA interaction domain also found in the vertebrate telomeric factors, we additionally show that a zinc-finger protein (NCU07846) and two proteins without any annotated DNA-binding domain (NCU02644 and NCU05718) are also direct double-strand TTAGGG binders. We further find two single-strand binders (NCU02404 [ncGbp2] and NCU07735 [ncTcg1]).

 

Conclusion. By quantitative label-free interactomics we identify TTAGGG-binding proteins in Neurospora crassa, suggesting candidates for telomeric factors that are supported by phylogenomic comparison with yeast species. Intriguingly, homologs in yeast species with degenerated telomeric repeats are also TTAGGG-binding proteins, e.g. in S. cerevisiae Tbf1 recognizes the TTAGGG motif found in its subtelomeres. However, there is also a subset of proteins that is not conserved. While a rudimentary core TTAGGG-recognition machinery may be conserved across yeast species, our data suggests Neurospora as an emerging model organism with unique features.


Via Francis Martin
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Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants

Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity.


Via Francis Martin
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Host target modification as a strategy to counter pathogen hijacking of the jasmonate hormone receptor

Host target modification as a strategy to counter pathogen hijacking of the jasmonate hormone receptor | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Significance

Pathogen infections can cause significant crop losses worldwide and major disturbances in natural ecosystems. Understanding the molecular basis of plant disease susceptibility is important for the development of new strategies to prevent disease outbreaks. Recent studies have identified the plant jasmonate (JA) hormone receptor as one of the common targets of pathogen virulence factors. In this study, we modified the JA receptor and showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants with the modified JA receptor gained resistance to bacterial pathogens that secrete a potent JA-mimicking toxin to promote infection. Our results suggest that host target modification may be developed as a new strategy to protect the disease-vulnerable components of the susceptible plant against highly evolved pathogens.
Abstract

In the past decade, characterization of the host targets of pathogen virulence factors took a center stage in the study of pathogenesis and disease susceptibility in plants and humans. However, the impressive knowledge of host targets has not been broadly exploited to inhibit pathogen infection. Here, we show that host target modification could be a promising new approach to “protect” the disease-vulnerable components of plants. In particular, recent studies have identified the plant hormone jasmonate (JA) receptor as one of the common targets of virulence factors from highly evolved biotrophic/hemibiotrophic pathogens. Strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, for example, produce proteinaceous effectors, as well as a JA-mimicking toxin, coronatine (COR), to activate JA signaling as a mechanism to promote disease susceptibility. Guided by the crystal structure of the JA receptor and evolutionary clues, we succeeded in modifying the JA receptor to allow for sufficient endogenous JA signaling but greatly reduced sensitivity to COR. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing this modified receptor not only are fertile and maintain a high level of insect defense, but also gain the ability to resist COR-producing pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and P. syringae pv. maculicola. Our results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that host target modification can be a promising new approach to prevent the virulence action of highly evolved pathogens.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids

Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Significance

Hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in crop yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. We report that some Arabidopsis F1 hybrids show changes to salicylic acid- and auxin-regulated defense and stress response gene expression. These changes could be important for generating the greater growth of some hybrids given the antagonistic relationship between plant growth and defense responses. Hybrids showing different levels of heterosis have changes in the salicylic acid- and auxin-regulated pathways that correlate with differences in the enhanced leaf growth. The larger leaves, and thus greater capacity for energy production, support the increased growth vigor and seed yields of the hybrids.
Abstract

Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Effectors and Plant Immunity
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BMC Genomics: Genomics and transcriptomics of Xanthomonas campestris species challenge the concept of core type III effectome (2015)

BMC Genomics: Genomics and transcriptomics of Xanthomonas campestris species challenge the concept of core type III effectome (2015) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Background

The bacterial species Xanthomonas campestris infects a wide range of Brassicaceae. Specific pathovars of this species cause black rot (pv. campestris), bacterial blight of stock (pv. incanae) or bacterial leaf spot (pv. raphani).

Results

In this study, we extended the genomic coverage of the species by sequencing and annotating the genomes of strains from pathovar incanae (CFBP 1606R and CFBP 2527R), pathovar raphani (CFBP 5828R) and a pathovar formerly named barbareae (CFBP 5825R). While comparative analyses identified a large core ORFeome at the species level, the core type III effectome was limited to only three putative type III effectors (XopP, XopF1 and XopAL1). In Xanthomonas, these effector proteins are injected inside the plant cells by the type III secretion system and contribute collectively to virulence. A deep and strand-specific RNA sequencing strategy was adopted in order to experimentally refine genome annotation for strain CFBP 5828R. This approach also allowed the experimental definition of novel ORFs and non-coding RNA transcripts. Using a constitutively active allele of hrpG, a master regulator of the type III secretion system, a HrpG-dependent regulon of 141 genes co-regulated with the type III secretion system was identified. Importantly, all these genes but seven are positively regulated by HrpG and 56 of those encode components of the Hrp type III secretion system and putative effector proteins.

Conclusions

This dataset is an important resource to mine for novel type III effector proteins as well as for bacterial genes which could contribute to pathogenicity of X. campestris.

 

Roux  Brice, Bolot  Stéphanie, Guy  Endrick, Denancé  Nicolas, Lautier  Martine, Jardinaud  Marie-Françoise, Fischer-Le Saux  Marion, Portier  Perrine, Jacques  Marie-Agnès, Gagnevin  Lionel, Pruvost  Olivier, Lauber  Emmanuelle, Arlat  Matthieu, Carrère  Sébastien, Koebnik  Ralf, Noël  Laurent

 

 


Via Nicolas Denancé
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Immunity And Microbial Effectors
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Genomic characterization of a South American Phytophthora hybrid mandates reassessment of the geographic origins of Phytophthora infestans

As the oomycete pathogen causing potato late blight disease, Phytophthora infestans triggered the famous 19th-century Irish potato famine and remains the leading cause of global commercial potato crop destruction. But the geographic origin of the genotype that caused this devastating initial outbreak remains disputed, as does the New World center of origin of the species itself. Both Mexico and South America have been proposed, generating considerable controversy. Here, we readdress the pathogen’s origins using a genomic dataset encompassing 71 globally-sourced modern and historical samples of P. infestans and the hybrid species P. andina, a close relative known only from the Andean highlands. Previous studies have suggested that the nuclear DNA lineage behind the initial outbreaks in Europe in 1845 is now extinct. Analysis of P. andina’s phased haplotypes recovered eight haploid genome sequences, four of which represent a previously unknown basal lineage of P. infestans closely related to the famine-era lineage. Our analyses further reveal that clonal lineages of both P. andina and historical P. infestans diverged earlier than modern Mexican lineages, casting doubt on recent claims of a Mexican center of origin. Finally, we use haplotype phasing to demonstrate that basal branches of the clade comprising Mexican samples are occupied by clonal isolates collected from wild Solanum hosts, suggesting that modern Mexican P. infestans diversified on S. tuberosum after a host jump from a wild species and that the origins of P. infestans are more complex than was previously thought.


Via IPM Lab
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Plants in the News: Help us identify 2015’s Plant Science Highlights | Plant Science Today

Plants in the News: Help us identify 2015’s Plant Science Highlights | Plant Science Today | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Normally, our Friday posts highlight plants featured in the news over the past week, but this week we take a short break to make an appeal for your thoughts on the most notable and newsworthy plant-related events, resources, breakthroughs and headline makers of the past year.

 

Here are the stories we featured last year as the Best of Plants 2014 (link).  We shared highlights from plant science communication, headline makers, and research highlights including the production of antibodies to treat Ebola Virus Disease in plants and advances in plant breeding and phenotyping, and a collection of research syntheses, educational resources, and fun stuff.

What do you consider the top stories, breakthroughs, headline makers and other highlights of plant science, 2015? You can reply to this blog, email mwilliams@aspb.org, or Tweet to @PlantTeaching. We’ll share our lists during the final week of the year.


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Plant Immunity: A Little Help from Fungal Friends - Current Biology -

Plant Immunity: A Little Help from Fungal Friends - Current Biology - | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Yew trees are famous for production of the anti-cancer drug Taxol® (paclitaxel). A new study sheds light on why endophytic fungi that live inside Yew trees also make the same drug.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant-microbe interaction
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Acetylation of an NB-LRR Plant Immune-Effector Complex Suppresses Immunity: Cell Reports

Acetylation of an NB-LRR Plant Immune-Effector Complex Suppresses Immunity: Cell Reports | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Highlights


•HopZ3 targets the RPM1 immune complex and effectors that activate this complex
•HopZ3 acetylates Ser, Thr, Lys, as well as His
•HopZ3 acetylates residues important for multiple facets of plant immune signaling
•Bacterial effector-effector interactions are implicated in the outcome of infection


Summary


Modifications of plant immune complexes by secreted pathogen effectors can trigger strong immune responses mediated by the action of nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat immune receptors. Although some strains of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae harbor effectors that individually can trigger immunity, the plant’s response may be suppressed by other virulence factors. This work reveals a robust strategy for immune suppression mediated by HopZ3, an effector in the YopJ family of acetyltransferases. The suppressing HopZ3 effector binds to and can acetylate multiple members of the RPM1 immune complex, as well as two P. syringae effectors that together activate the RPM1 complex. These acetylations modify serine, threonine, lysine, and/or histidine residues in the targets. Through HopZ3-mediated acetylation, it is possible that the whole effector-immune complex is inactivated, leading to increased growth of the pathogen.


Via Suayib Üstün
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Plant Immunity—At the Crossroad of Life and Death

Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Plant Immunity—At the Crossroad of Life and Death | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Rapid and complex immune responses are induced in plants upon pathogen recognition. One form of plant defense response is a programmed burst in transcription and translation of pathogenesis-related proteins, of which many rely on ER processing. Interestingly, several ER stress marker genes are up-regulated during early stages of immune responses, suggesting that enhanced ER capacity is needed for immunity. Eukaryotic cells respond to ER stress through conserved signaling networks initiated by specific ER stress sensors tethered to the ER membrane. Depending on the nature of ER stress the cell prioritizes either survival or initiates programmed cell death (PCD). At present two plant ER stress sensors, bZIP28 and IRE1, have been described. Both sensor proteins are involved in ER stress-induced signaling, but only IRE1 has been additionally linked to immunity. A second branch of immune responses relies on PCD. In mammals, ER stress sensors are involved in activation of PCD, but it is unclear if plant ER stress sensors play a role in PCD. Nevertheless, some ER resident proteins have been linked to pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of plant ER stress signaling and its cross-talk with immune signaling.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
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Opposing Effects on Two Phases of Defense Responses from Concerted Actions of HEAT SHOCK COGNATE70 and BONZAI1 in Arabidopsis

Opposing Effects on Two Phases of Defense Responses from Concerted Actions of HEAT SHOCK COGNATE70 and BONZAI1 in Arabidopsis | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
The plant immune system consists of multiple layers of responses targeting various phases of pathogen infection. Here, we provide evidence showing that two responses, one controlling stomatal closure and the other mediated by intracellular receptor proteins, can be regulated by the same proteins but in an antagonistic manner. The HEAT SHOCK COGNATE70 (HSC70), while previously known as a negative regulator of stomatal closure, is a positive regulator of immune responses mediated by the immune receptor protein SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1) as well as basal defense responses. In contrast to HSC70, a calcium-binding protein, BONZAI1 (BON1), promotes abscisic acid- and pathogen-triggered stomatal closure in addition to and independent of its previously known negative role in SNC1 regulation. BON1 likely regulates stomatal closure through activating SUPPESSOR OF THE G2 ALLELE OF SKP1 VARIANT B and inhibiting HSC70. New functions of BON1 and HSC70 identified in this study thus reveal opposite effects of each of them on immunity. The opposing roles of these regulators at different phases of plant immune responses exemplify the complexity in immunity regulation and suggest that immune receptors may guard positive regulators functioning at stomatal closure control.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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