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Nature Reviews Immunology: Effector-triggered versus pattern-triggered immunity: how animals sense pathogens (2013)

Nature Reviews Immunology: Effector-triggered versus pattern-triggered immunity: how animals sense pathogens (2013) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

http://www.nature.com/nri/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nri3398.html

 

A fundamental question regarding any immune system is how it can discriminate between pathogens and non-pathogens. Here, we discuss how this discrimination can be mediated by a surveillance system distinct from pattern-recognition receptors that recognize conserved microbial patterns. It can be based instead on the ability of the host to sense perturbations in host cells induced by bacterial toxins or 'effectors' that are encoded by pathogenic microorganisms. Such 'effector-triggered immunity' was previously demonstrated mainly in plants, but recent data confirm that animals can also use this strategy.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Jennifer Mach's comment, February 19, 2013 5:36 AM
"...previously demonstrated mainly in plants, but recent data confirm that animals can also use this strategy." This sentence should be read by all granting agencies.
Freddy Monteiro's comment, February 19, 2013 6:47 AM
with all due respect, this was the kind of information and approach I was expecting at the 2012 IS-MPMI Congress opening lecture.
Kamoun Lab @ TSL's comment, February 20, 2013 7:44 PM
Freddy, yes you have a point. Sadly, our animal immunity colleagues seem oblivious to the plant literature. I think the authors of this review have earned themselves many invitations on the plant biology lecture circuit.
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.: Conferences :.

.: Conferences :. | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

We welcome you to the second conference on Ecology of Soil Microorganisms to be held in November/December 2015 in Prague. The conference is planned as an interdisciplinary platform where data from different experts can be linked and new strategies for further research topics can be defined. This includes questions addressing microbial communities and (meta)genomes in soils and their role in soil quality and soil health. An important link will be made to metatranscriptomics , metaproteomics and particularly enzymology, which is crucial to unravel what the measured rates of microbial processes tell us about the cycling of elements and organic matter as a whole. Another issue is a wide scope covering both bacterial and fungal ecology and the ecology of archaea. Overall the conference should help to build up a conceptual framework that incorporates not only the diversity of microorganisms, but also their functions and properties of their abiotic environments. Our aim is to bring experts from all these disciplines to a meeting where all can benefit from interaction. We hope that this was achieved already during our first meeting in 2011, attended by more than 400 delegates, and look forward to meeting you in Prague in 2015.


Via Francis Martin
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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A tidal wave of signals: calcium and ROS at the forefront of rapid systemic signaling: Trends in Plant Science

A tidal wave of signals: calcium and ROS at the forefront of rapid systemic signaling: Trends in Plant Science | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Systemic signaling pathways enable multicellular organisms to prepare all of their tissues and cells to an upcoming challenge that may initially only be sensed by a few local cells. They are activated in plants in response to different stimuli including mechanical injury, pathogen infection, and abiotic stresses. Key to the mobilization of systemic signals in higher plants are cell-to-cell communication events that have thus far been mostly unstudied. The recent identification of systemically propagating calcium (Ca2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) waves in plants has unraveled a new and exciting cell-to-cell communication pathway that, together with electric signals, could provide a working model demonstrating how plant cells transmit long-distance signals via cell-to-cell communication mechanisms. Here, we summarize recent findings on the ROS and Ca2+ waves and outline a possible model for their integration.


Via Christophe Jacquet, Mary Williams
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Expansion of Biological Pathways Based on Evolutionary Inference: Cell

Expansion of Biological Pathways Based on Evolutionary Inference: Cell | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

The availability of diverse genomes makes it possible to predict gene function based on shared evolutionary history. This approach can be challenging, however, for pathways whose components do not exhibit a shared history but rather consist of distinct “evolutionary modules.” We introduce a computational algorithm, clustering by inferred models of evolution (CLIME), which inputs a eukaryotic species tree, homology matrix, and pathway (gene set) of interest. CLIME partitions the gene set into disjoint evolutionary modules, simultaneously learning the number of modules and a tree-based evolutionary history that defines each module. CLIME then expands each module by scanning the genome for new components that likely arose under the inferred evolutionary model. Application of CLIME to ∼1,000 annotated human pathways and to the proteomes of yeast, red algae, and malaria reveals unanticipated evolutionary modularity and coevolving components. CLIME is freely available and should become increasingly powerful with the growing wealth of eukaryotic genomes.


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The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and evidence for independent domestication : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group

The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and evidence for independent domestication : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Mingsheng Chen, Klaus Mayer, Steve Rounsley, Rod Wing and colleagues report the genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima), a different species than Asian rice. The authors resequenced 20 O. glaberrima accessions and 94 Oryza barthii accessions (the putative progenitor species of O. glaberrima), and their analyses support the hypothesis that O. glaberrima was domesticated in a single region along the upper Niger river.

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Scopoletin is a phytoalexin against Alternaria alternata in wild tobacco dependent on jasmonate signalling

Scopoletin is a phytoalexin against Alternaria alternata in wild tobacco dependent on jasmonate signalling | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Alternaria alternata (tobacco pathotype) is a necrotrophic fungus causing severe losses in Nicotiana species by infection of mature leaves. Similar to what has been observed in cultivated tobacco, N. tabacum, young leaves of wild tobacco, N. attenuata, were more resistant to A. alternata than mature leaves, and this was correlated with stronger blue fluorescence induced after infection. However, the nature of the fluorescence-emitting compound, its role in defence, and its regulation were not clear. Silencing feruloyl-CoA 6ʹ-hydroxylase 1 (F6ʹH1), the gene encoding the key enzyme for scopoletin biosynthesis, by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) revealed that the blue fluorescence was mainly emitted by scopoletin and its β-glycoside form, scopolin. Further analysis showed that scopoletin exhibited strong antifungal activity against A. alternata in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, jasmonic acid (JA) levels were highly elicited in young leaves but much less in mature leaves after infection; and fungus-elicited scopoletin was absent in JA-deficient plants, but was largely restored with methyl jasmonate treatments. Consistent with this, plants strongly impaired in JA biosynthesis and perception were highly susceptible to A. alternata in the same way scopoletin/scopolin-depleted VIGS F6ʹH1 plants. Furthermore, silencing MYC2, a master regulator of most JA responses, reduced A. alternata-induced NaF6ʹH1 transcripts and scopoletin. Thus, it is concluded that JA signalling is activated in N. attenuata leaves after infection, which subsequently regulates scopoletin biosynthesis for the defence against A. alternata partly through MYC2, and higher levels of scopoletin accumulated in young leaves account for their strong resistance.


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Expression of Animal Anti-Apoptotic Gene Ced-9 Enhances Tolerance during Glycine max L.–Bradyrhizobium japonicum Interaction under Saline Stress but Reduces Nodule Formation

Expression of Animal Anti-Apoptotic Gene Ced-9 Enhances Tolerance during Glycine max L.–Bradyrhizobium japonicum Interaction under Saline Stress but Reduces Nodule Formation | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

The mechanisms by which the expression of animal cell death suppressors in economically important plants conferred enhanced stress tolerance are not fully understood. In the present work, the effect of expression of animal antiapoptotic gene Ced-9 in soybean hairy roots was evaluated under root hairs and hairy roots death-inducing stress conditions given by i) Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl, and ii) severe salt stress (150 mM NaCl), for 30 min and 3 h, respectively. We have determined that root hairs death induced by inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl showed characteristics of ordered process, with increased ROS generation, MDA and ATP levels, whereas the cell death induced by 150 mM NaCl treatment showed non-ordered or necrotic-like characteristics. The expression of Ced-9 inhibited or at least delayed root hairs death under these treatments. Hairy roots expressing Ced-9 had better homeostasis maintenance, preventing potassium release; increasing the ATP levels and controlling the oxidative damage avoiding the increase of reactive oxygen species production. Even when our results demonstrate a positive effect of animal cell death suppressors in plant cell ionic and redox homeostasis under cell death-inducing conditions, its expression, contrary to expectations, drastically inhibited nodule formation even under control conditions.


Via Christophe Jacquet, Jean-Michel Ané
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The Arabidopsis Malectin-Like Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase IOS1 Associates with the Pattern Recognition Receptors FLS2 and EFR and Is Critical for Priming of Pattern-Triggered Immunity

The Arabidopsis Malectin-Like Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase IOS1 Associates with the Pattern Recognition Receptors FLS2 and EFR and Is Critical for Priming of Pattern-Triggered Immunity | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors such as FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR) recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) to activate the first layer of plant immunity termed pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). A reverse genetics approach with genes responsive to the priming agent β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) revealed IMPAIRED OOMYCETE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (IOS1) as a critical PTI player. Arabidopsis thaliana ios1 mutants were hypersusceptible to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Accordingly, ios1 mutants demonstrated defective PTI responses, notably delayed upregulation of PTI marker genes, lower callose deposition, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activities upon bacterial infection or MAMP treatment. Moreover, Arabidopsis lines overexpressing IOS1 were more resistant to P. syringae and demonstrated a primed PTI response. In vitro pull-down, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, coimmunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry analyses supported the existence of complexes between the membrane-localized IOS1 and FLS2 and EFR. IOS1 also associated with BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) in a ligand-independent manner and positively regulated FLS2/BAK1 complex formation upon MAMP treatment. Finally, ios1 mutants were defective in BABA-induced resistance and priming. This work reveals IOS1 as a regulatory protein of FLS2- and EFR-mediated signaling that primes PTI activation upon bacterial elicitation.


Via Suayib Üstün
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Shaping a root system: regulating lateral versus primary root growth: Trends in Plant Science

Shaping a root system: regulating lateral versus primary root growth: Trends in Plant Science | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Primary and lateral roots comprise root systems, which are vital to the growth and survival of plants. Several molecular mechanisms associated with primary and lateral root growth have been described, including some common regulatory factors for their initiation and development. However, in this opinion article, we discuss the distinct growth behavior of lateral roots in response to environmental cues, such as salinity, gravity, and nutrient availability, which are mediated via specific regulators. We propose that differential growth dynamics between primary and lateral roots are crucial for plants to adapt to the ever-changing environmental conditions.


Via Francis Martin, Jean-Michel Ané
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Frontiers | Killing two birds with one stone: trans-kingdom suppression of PAMP/MAMP-induced immunity by T3E from enteropathogenic bacteria | Plant-Microbe Interaction

Frontiers | Killing two birds with one stone: trans-kingdom suppression of PAMP/MAMP-induced immunity by T3E from enteropathogenic bacteria | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Within the past decade, remarkable similarities between the molecular organization of animal and plant systems for non-self discrimination were revealed. Obvious parallels exist between the molecular structures of the receptors mediating the recognition of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) with plant pattern recognition receptors strikingly resembling mammalian Toll-like receptors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, leading to the transcriptional activation of immunity-associated genes, illustrate the conservation of whole molecular building blocks of PAMP/MAMP-induced signaling. Enteropathogenic Salmonella and Escherichia coli use a type three secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into the mammalian host cell to subvert defense mechanisms and promote gut infection. Lately, disease occurrence was increasingly associated with bacteria-contaminated fruits and vegetables and common themes have emerged with regard to whether and how effectors target innate immune responses in a trans-kingdom manner. We propose that numerous Salmonella or E. coli effectors may be active in planta and tend to target central components (hubs) of immune signaling pathways.


Via Jim Alfano, Suayib Üstün
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Evidence for biological denitrification inhibition (BDI) by plant secondary metabolites

Evidence for biological denitrification inhibition (BDI) by plant secondary metabolites | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Previous studies on the effect of secondary metabolites on the functioning of rhizosphere microbial communities have often focused on aspects of the nitrogen (N) cycle but have overlooked biological denitrification inhibition (BDI), which can affect plant N-nutrition. Here, we investigated the BDI by the compounds of Fallopia spp., an invasive weed shown to be associated with a low potential denitrification of the soil.Fallopia spp. extracts were characterized by chromatographic analysis and were used to test the BDI effects on the metabolic and respiratory activities of denitrifying bacteria, under aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) conditions. The BDI of Fallopia spp. extracts was tested on a complex soil community by measuring denitrification enzyme activity (DEA), substrate induced respiration (SIR), as well as abundances of denitrifiers and total bacteria.In 15 strains of denitrifying bacteria, extracts led to a greater BDI (92%) than respiration inhibition (50%). Anaerobic metabolic activity reduction was correlated with catechin concentrations and the BDI was dose dependent. In soil, extracts reduced the DEA/SIR ratio without affecting the denitrifiers: total bacteria ratio.We show that secondary metabolite(s) from Fallopia spp. inhibit denitrification. This provides new insight into plant–soil interactions and improves our understanding of a plant's ability to shape microbial soil functioning.
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Plant Cell: Interaction of the Arabidopsis GTPase RabA4c with Its Effector PMR4 Results in Complete Penetration Resistance to Powdery Mildew (2014)

Plant Cell: Interaction of the Arabidopsis GTPase RabA4c with Its Effector PMR4 Results in Complete Penetration Resistance to Powdery Mildew (2014) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

The (1,3)-β-glucan callose is a major component of cell wall thickenings in response to pathogen attack in plants. GTPases have been suggested to regulate pathogen-induced callose biosynthesis. To elucidate the regulation of callose biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we screened microarray data and identified transcriptional upregulation of the GTPase RabA4c after biotic stress. We studied the function of RabA4c in its native and dominant negative (dn) isoform inRabA4c overexpression lines. RabA4c overexpression caused complete penetration resistance to the virulent powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum due to enhanced callose deposition at early time points of infection, which prevented fungal ingress into epidermal cells. By contrast,RabA4c(dn) overexpression did not increase callose deposition or penetration resistance. A cross of the resistant line with the pmr4 disruption mutant lacking the stress-induced callose synthase PMR4 revealed that enhanced callose deposition and penetration resistance were PMR4-dependent. In live-cell imaging, tagged RabA4c was shown to localize at the plasma membrane prior to infection, which was broken in the pmr4 disruption mutant background, with callose deposits at the site of attempted fungal penetration. Together with our interactions studies including yeast two-hybrid, pull-down, and in planta fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays, we concluded that RabA4c directly interacts with PMR4, which can be seen as an effector of this GTPase.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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New Phytologist: Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology (2014)

New Phytologist: Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology (2014) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Filamentous pathogens pose a substantial threat to global food security. One central question in plant pathology is how pathogens cause infection and manage to evade or suppress plant immunity to promote disease. With many technological advances over the past decade, including DNA sequencing technology, an array of new tools has become embedded within the toolbox of next-generation plant pathologists. By employing a multidisciplinary approach plant pathologists can fully leverage these technical advances to answer key questions in plant pathology, aimed at achieving global food security. This review discusses the impact of: cell biology and genetics on progressing our understanding of infection structure formation on the leaf surface; biochemical and molecular analysis to study how pathogens subdue plant immunity and manipulate plant processes through effectors; genomics and DNA sequencing technologies on all areas of plant pathology; and new forms of collaboration on accelerating exploitation of big data. As we embark on the next phase in plant pathology, the integration of systems biology promises to provide a holistic perspective of plant–pathogen interactions from big data and only once we fully appreciate these complexities can we design truly sustainable solutions to preserve our resources.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Alejandro Rojas
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Marie Zen Attitude's curator insight, July 26, 5:21 AM

Un petit lien spécial pour Emeric ;)

 

Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Immunity And Microbial Effectors
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Elicitin-like proteins Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 from Pythium oligandrum trigger hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana and induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

Elicitin-like proteins Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 from Pythium oligandrum trigger hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana and induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
Summary
The biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum and its elicitin-like proteins oligandrins have been shown to induce disease resistance in a range of plants.

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Whole Genome and Global Gene Expression Analyses of the Model Mushroom Flammulina velutipes Reveal a High Capacity for Lignocellulose Degradation

Whole Genome and Global Gene Expression Analyses of the Model Mushroom Flammulina velutipes Reveal a High Capacity for Lignocellulose Degradation | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Flammulina velutipes is a fungus with health and medicinal benefits that has been used for consumption and cultivation in East Asia. F. velutipes is also known to degrade lignocellulose and produce ethanol. The overlapping interests of mushroom production and wood bioconversion make F. velutipes an attractive new model for fungal wood related studies. Here, we present the complete sequence of the F. velutipes genome. This is the first sequenced genome for a commercially produced edible mushroom that also degrades wood. The 35.6-Mb genome contained 12,218 predicted protein-encoding genes and 287 tRNA genes assembled into 11 scaffolds corresponding with the 11 chromosomes of strain KACC42780. The 88.4-kb mitochondrial genome contained 35 genes. Well-developed wood degrading machinery with strong potential for lignin degradation (69 auxiliary activities, formerly FOLymes) and carbohydrate degradation (392 CAZymes), along with 58 alcohol dehydrogenase genes were highly expressed in the mycelium, demonstrating the potential application of this organism to bioethanol production. Thus, the newly uncovered wood degrading capacity and sequential nature of this process in F. velutipes, offer interesting possibilities for more detailed studies on either lignin or (hemi-) cellulose degradation in complex wood substrates. The mutual interest in wood degradation by the mushroom industry and (ligno-)cellulose biomass related industries further increase the significance of F. velutipes as a new model.

 


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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Rice Blast
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Solution NMR Structures of Active Pyrenophora tritici-repentis ToxB and its Inactive Homolog Reveal Potential Determinants of Toxin Activity

Solution NMR Structures of Active Pyrenophora tritici-repentis ToxB and its Inactive Homolog Reveal Potential Determinants of Toxin Activity | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Structural similarity searches of the protein databank servers identify the avirulence protein AvrPiz-t (PDB ID: 2LW6), produced by Magnaporthe oryzae, as structurally similar to ToxB (sequence identity of 20%, Z-score = 5.0, RMSD 2.3 Å)

 

AvrPiz-t and ToxB are both effectors contributing to the virulence of
the fungus that produces them.

 

Toxicity is correlated with decreased compactness, increased flexibility, and polymorphism in an active site loop.

 


Via Elsa Ballini
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Tricking plants to see the light may control the most important twitch on Earth | CALS News

Tricking plants to see the light may control the most important twitch on Earth | CALS News | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, July 30, 1:48 PM

Such awesome work - summary of the Vierstra lab's determination of the crystal structure of the light-sensing domain of phytochrome
www.pnas.org/content/111/28/10179.abstract

Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant-microbe interactions (on the plant's side)
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Pepper mildew resistance locus O interacts with pepper calmodulin and suppresses Xanthomonas AvrBsT-triggered cell death and defense responses

Pepper mildew resistance locus O interacts with pepper calmodulin and suppresses Xanthomonas AvrBsT-triggered cell death and defense responses | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Pathogen-induced cell death is closely linked with disease susceptibility and resistance in plants. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) mildew resistance locus O (CaMLO2) and calmodulin (CaCaM1) genes are required for disease-associated cell death and hypersensitive cell death, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that pathogen-responsive CaMLO2 interacts with CaCaM1 in yeast and in planta. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation analyses confirm a specific interaction between CaMLO2 and CaCaM1 at the plasma membrane (PM) in plant cells. Subcellular localization analyses of CaCaM1 fused to green fluorescent protein reveals that treatment with Ca2+ and co-expression with CaMLO2 induce translocation of cytosolic CaCaM1 to the PM where CaMLO2 is localized. Transient CaMLO2 expression negatively regulates CaCaM1 accumulation in Nicotiana benthamiana. Xanthomonas avrBsT-triggered Ca2+ influx and hypersensitive cell death are disrupted by CaCaM1 and/or CaMLO2 expression. CaMLO2 silencing in pepper significantly enhances reactive oxygen species burst, cell death, and resistance responses to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Ds1 and Ds1 (avrBsT), which is accompanied by enhanced induction of CaCaM1, CaPR1 (PR-1), and CaPO2 (peroxidase). These results suggest that CaMLO2 interacts with CaCaM1 and suppresses AvrBsT-triggered cell death and defense responses.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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Jasmonic acid signaling mediates resistance of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata to its native Fusarium, but not Alternaria, fungal pathogens

Jasmonic acid signaling mediates resistance of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata to its native Fusarium, but not Alternaria, fungal pathogens | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

We recently characterized a highly dynamic fungal disease outbreak in native populations of Nicotiana attenuata in the southwestern USA. Here we explore how phytohormone signaling contributes to the observed disease dynamics. Single inoculation with three native Fusarium and Alternaria fungal pathogens, isolated from diseased plants growing in native populations, resulted in disease symptoms characteristic for each pathogen species. While Alternaria sp.-infected plants displayed fewer symptoms and recovered, Fusarium spp.-infected plants became chlorotic and frequently spontaneously wilted. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) levels were differentially induced after Fusarium or Alternaria infection. Transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in JA production or JA conjugation to isoleucine (JA-Ile), but not in JA perception, were highly susceptible to infection by F. brachygibbosum Utah 4, indicating that products derived from the JA-Ile biosynthetic pathway but not their perception is associated with increased Fusarium resistance. Infection assays using ov-nahG plants which were silenced in pathogen-induced SA accumulations revealed that SA may increase N. attenuata's resistance to Fusarium infection but not to Alternaria. Taken together, we propose that the dynamics of fungal disease symptoms among plants in native populations may be explained by a complex interplay of phytohormone responses to attack by multiple pathogens.


Via Christophe Jacquet
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The ISME Journal - Quantifying separation and similarity in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae metapopulation

The ISME Journal - Quantifying separation and similarity in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae metapopulation | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Eukaryotic microbes are key ecosystem drivers; however, we have little theory and few data elucidating the processes influencing their observed population patterns. Here we provide an in-depth quantitative analysis of population separation and similarity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aim of providing a more detailed account of the population processes occurring in microbes. Over 10 000 individual isolates were collected from native plants, vineyards and spontaneous ferments of fruit from six major regions spanning 1000 km across New Zealand. From these, hundreds of S. cerevisiae genotypes were obtained, and using a suite of analytical methods we provide comprehensive quantitative estimates for both population structure and rates of gene flow or migration. No genetic differentiation was detected within geographic regions, even between populations inhabiting native forests and vineyards. We do, however, reveal a picture of national population structure at scales above ~100 km with distinctive populations in the more remote Nelson and Central Otago regions primarily contributing to this. In addition, differential degrees of connectivity between regional populations are observed and correlate with the movement of fruit by the New Zealand wine industry. This suggests some anthropogenic influence on these observed population patterns.


Via Francis Martin
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The Arabidopsis Malectin-Like Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase IOS1 Associates with the Pattern Recognition Receptors FLS2 and EFR and Is Critical for Priming of Pattern-Triggered Immunity

The Arabidopsis Malectin-Like Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase IOS1 Associates with the Pattern Recognition Receptors FLS2 and EFR and Is Critical for Priming of Pattern-Triggered Immunity | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors such as FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR) recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) to activate the first layer of plant immunity termed pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). A reverse genetics approach with genes responsive to the priming agent β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) revealed IMPAIRED OOMYCETE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (IOS1) as a critical PTI player. Arabidopsis thaliana ios1 mutants were hypersusceptible to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Accordingly, ios1 mutants demonstrated defective PTI responses, notably delayed upregulation of PTI marker genes, lower callose deposition, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activities upon bacterial infection or MAMP treatment. Moreover, Arabidopsis lines overexpressing IOS1 were more resistant to P. syringae and demonstrated a primed PTI response. In vitro pull-down, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, coimmunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry analyses supported the existence of complexes between the membrane-localized IOS1 and FLS2 and EFR. IOS1 also associated with BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) in a ligand-independent manner and positively regulated FLS2/BAK1 complex formation upon MAMP treatment. Finally, ios1 mutants were defective in BABA-induced resistance and priming. This work reveals IOS1 as a regulatory protein of FLS2- and EFR-mediated signaling that primes PTI activation upon bacterial elicitation.


Via Suayib Üstün
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Understanding the rhizosphere better ... Trends in Plant Science

Understanding the rhizosphere better ... Trends in Plant Science | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Evidence is mounting for the importance of understanding the rhizosphere better in order to lay the foundation for the next green revolution. Root biology and how they interact with their environment may well be one of the fastest growing areas in plant science and in this focus issue we are following some of the latest trends, such as root architecture, root development, and plant–soil fungal interactions. On pages 419–425 Arthur Q. Villordon and colleagues propose that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems. On pages 426–431 Zhaojun Ding and colleagues highlight how differential growth dynamics between primary and lateral roots appear to be crucial for plants to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Finally, on pages 432–438 Matthias C. Rillig and colleagues propose a new framework for studying the complexity of soil fungal communities


Via Francis Martin, Jean-Michel Ané
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Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, July 23, 8:48 AM

Yeahhhh... a focus issue on the rhizosphere.!

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Untapped Plant Microbiome Could Help Feed Billions

Untapped Plant Microbiome Could Help Feed Billions | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it
The Human Microbiome Project revealed tens of trillions of microbes residing in and on humans. Now scientists are taking a census of plant microbes—and not just the hundreds of billions found in soils. Distinct microbial communities live inside roots, on leaves and within flowers, and all in all have an estimated three to six orders of magnitude greater genetic diversity than their plant hosts. This second genome, much like the human microbiome, provides plants access to nutrients and helps to suppress disease. Scientists and farmers alike think it represents the next big thing in agriculture.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
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PLOS Pathogens: Pto Kinase Binds Two Domains of AvrPtoB and Its Proximity to the Effector E3 Ligase Determines if It Evades Degradation and Activates Plant Immunity (2014)

PLOS Pathogens: Pto Kinase Binds Two Domains of AvrPtoB and Its Proximity to the Effector E3 Ligase Determines if It Evades Degradation and Activates Plant Immunity (2014) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

The tomato—Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst)—pathosystem is one of the best understood models for plant-pathogen interactions. Certain wild relatives of tomato express two closely related members of the same kinase family, Pto and Fen, which recognize the Pstvirulence protein AvrPtoB and activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI). AvrPtoB, however, contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain in its carboxyl terminus which causes degradation of Fen and undermines its ability to activate ETI. In contrast, Pto evades AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and triggers ETI in response to the effector. It has been reported recently that Pto has higher kinase activity than Fen and that this difference allows Pto to inactivate the E3 ligase through phosphorylation of threonine-450 (T450) in AvrPtoB. Here we show that, in contrast to Fen which can only interact with a single domain proximal to the E3 ligase of AvrPtoB, Pto binds two distinct domains of the effector, the same site as Fen and another N-terminal domain. In the absence of E3 ligase activity Pto binds to either domain of AvrPtoB to activate ETI. However, the presence of an active E3 ligase domain causes ubiquitination of Pto that interacts with the domain proximal to the E3 ligase, identical to ubiquitination of Fen. Only when Pto binds its unique distal domain can it resist AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and activate ETI. We show that phosphorylation of T450 is not required for Pto-mediated resistance in vivo and that a kinase-inactive version of Pto is still capable of activating ETI in response to AvrPtoB. Our results demonstrate that the ability of Pto to interact with a second site distal to the E3 ligase domain in AvrPtoB, and not a higher kinase activity or T450 phosphorylation, allows Pto to evade ubiquitination and to confer immunity to Pst.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Fungal|Oomycete Biology
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New Phytol: Reprogramming of plant cells by filamentous plant-colonizing microbes

New Phytol: Reprogramming of plant cells by filamentous plant-colonizing microbes | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Although phylogenetically unrelated, filamentous oomycetes and fungi establish similar structures to colonize plants and they represent economically the most important microbial threat to crop production. In mutualistic interactions established by root-colonizing fungi, clear differences to pathogens can be seen, but there is mounting evidence that their infection strategies and molecular interactions have certain common features. To infect the host, fungi and oomycetes employ similar strategies to circumvent plant innate immunity. This process involves the suppression of basal defence responses which are triggered by the perception of conserved molecular patterns. To establish biotrophy, effector proteins are secreted from mutualistic and pathogenic microbes to the host tissue, where they play central roles in the modulation of host immunity and metabolic reprogramming of colonized host tissues. This review article discusses key effector mechanisms of filamentous pathogens and mutualists, how they modulate their host targets and the fundamental differences or parallels between these different interactions. The orchestration of effector actions during plant infection and the importance of their localization within host tissues are also discussed.


Via Stéphane Hacquard, Alejandro Rojas
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Rescooped by Guogen Yang from Plant Pathogenomics
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Genome Biology and Evolution: Gene loss rather than gene gain is associated with a host jump from monocots to dicots in the smut fungus Melanopsichium pennsylvanicum (2014)

Genome Biology and Evolution: Gene loss rather than gene gain is associated with a host jump from monocots to dicots in the smut fungus Melanopsichium pennsylvanicum (2014) | Plant-Microbe Interaction | Scoop.it

Smut fungi are well-suited to investigate the ecology and evolution of plant pathogens, as they are strictly biotrophic, yet cultivable on media. Here we report the genome sequence of Melanopsichium pennsylvanicum, closely related to Ustilago maydis and other Poaceae-infecting smuts, but parasitic to a dicot plant. To explore the evolutionary patterns resulting from host adaptation after this huge host jump, the genome of M. pennsylvanicum was sequenced and compared to the genomes of Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum, and Ustilago hordei. While all four genomes had a similar completeness in CEGMA analyses, gene absence was highest in M. pennsylvanicum, and most pronounced in putative secreted proteins, which are often considered as effector candidates. In contrast, the amount of private genes was similar among the species, highlighting that gene loss rather than gene gain is the hallmark of adaptation after the host jump to the dicot host. Our analyses revealed a trend of putative effectors to be next to another putative effector, but the majority of these are not in clusters and thus the focus on pathogenicity clusters might not be appropriate for all smut genomes. Positive selection studies revealed that M. pennsylvanicum has the highest number and proportion of genes under positive selection. In general, putative effectors showed a higher proportion of positively selected genes than non-effector candidates. The 248 putative secreted effectors found in all four smut genomes might constitute a core set needed for pathogenicity, while those 92 that are found in all grass-parasitic smuts, but have no ortholog in M. pennsylvanicum might constitute a set of effectors important for successful colonization of grass hosts.


Via Francis Martin, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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