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Plant health
Research, new developments and findings of organisms, harmful to plants.
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New wheat varieties resist global wheat threat - PhysOrg.com

New wheat varieties resist global wheat threat - PhysOrg.com | Plant health | Scoop.it

Speaking as a panelist in the "Emerging Risks in the Global Food System" a session organized by William Fry, Cornell professor of plant pathology, Singh noted: "... enhanced breeding techniques such as shuttle breeding are helping create new durable disease-resistant varieties of wheat that will increase yields to better meet global demand."

PhysOrg.com

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Host-induced gene silencing: a tool for understanding fungal host interaction and for developing novel disease control strategies - NUNES - 2011 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library

Host-induced gene silencing: a tool for understanding fungal host interaction and for developing novel disease control strategies - NUNES - 2011 - Molecular Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library | Plant health | Scoop.it

Nunes CC & Dean RA (Molecular Plant Pathology, 2011, BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd): Host-induced gene silencing is discussed as a tool for understanding fungal host interaction and developing disease control strategies.

Recent discoveries regarding small RNAs and the mechanisms of gene silencing are providing new opportunities to explore fungal pathogen–host interactions and potential strategies for novel disease control. Plant pathogenic fungi are a constant and major threat to global food security; they represent the largest group of disease-causing agents on crop plants on the planet. 


Plant–fungus interactions are included in recent studies of invading pathogenic fungi, such as Fusarium verticillioides, Blumeria graminis and Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici. The authors highlight the important general aspects of RNA silencing mechanisms and emphasize recent findings from plant pathogenic fungi, strategies to employ RNA silencing and address important aspects for the development of fungal-derived resistance through the expression of silencing constructs in host plants as a powerful strategy to control fungal disease.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1364-3703.2011.00766.x

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Molecular Aspects of Plant Disease Resistance

Molecular Aspects of Plant Disease Resistance | Plant health | Scoop.it

Molecular Aspects of Plant Disease Resistance book

 

...ebook downloads...

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Nature: The genome of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae reveals herbivorous pest adaptations | Plant Pathogenomics

Nature: The genome of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae reveals herbivorous pest adaptations | Plant Pathogenomics | Plant health | Scoop.it
The spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a cosmopolitan agricultural pest with an extensive host plant range and an extreme record of pesticide resistance.
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New rice variety fights off pests

A new variety of rice (ANMI) resistant to the brown planthopper, blast, bacterial blight and cold stress, has been developed by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) at the request of the Republic of Korea.

Via Luigi Guarino, Ashesh
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Plant Disease: Potato and Tomato Late Blight Caused by Phytophthora infestans: An Overview of Pathology and Resistance Breeding

Plant Disease: Potato and Tomato Late Blight Caused by Phytophthora infestans: An Overview of Pathology and Resistance Breeding | Plant health | Scoop.it

Recent achievements in better understanding of the P. infestans pathogenesis, host-pathogen interactions, and the progress made in developing genetic resistance in potato and tomato is summarized bellow.

Late blight (LB) caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is a major disease of potato and tomato worldwide and can cause up to 100% yield losses.


The devastating economic impact of this disease intensified the related pathology and genetics research since the occurrence of Irish famine in 1840s, with a side gain of major scientific discoveries. For example, many of the crucial steps involved in LB defense response in host plants have been elucidated through the use of modern cytological and molecular biology techniques. Also, genetic and biochemical studies have revealed differences between oomycetes and pathogenic fungi, which has led to more selective use of chemicals for LB control. Furthermore, the discovery of P. infestans two mating types and the resultant generation of more aggressive lineages by sexual recombination stresses the need for an integrated and sustainable approach to LB control. These measures would include the use of cultural practices, selective fungicide applications, and genetic resistance.

In potato at least a dozen major resistance genes and several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for LB resistance have been identified, and most modern cultivars have been bred with one or more resistance genes. In tomato, though most commercial cultivars are susceptible to LB, a few major resistance genes and several QTLs have been identified and several breeding programs around the world are developing breeding lines and commercial cultivars with LB resistance. Most recently, a few fresh-market tomato hybrid cultivars with LB resistance were released by the North Carolina State University Tomato Breeding Program in the United States. There is, however, an insufficient number of potato and tomato cultivars with LB resistance, resulting in continued expensive as well as the hazardous and increasingly ineffective use of chemicals for disease control. In an era when both host plants and P. infestans genomes are sequenced and considerable genomic information is available, it is not unexpected that a more sustainable solution to controlling LB is on the horizon.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Call to Arms: How Plants Mobilize Defenses - Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Call to Arms: How Plants Mobilize Defenses - Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Plant health | Scoop.it

Plants do not have an immune system like animals do to fend of pathogenes. Recently Xinnian Dong discovered how plants mobilize defenses. At Howard Hughes Medical Institute they found several candidates that belong to a family of proteins that help plants survive high temperatures. Plants can switch on genes that code pathogene- fighting proteins. The on-off switches for these genes often carry a characteristic gene sequence called TL1.

 

See her research paper on Mechanisms and Dynamic Regulation of Plant Immune Responses.

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Vegetable Seeds Disease Resistance Buying List

Vegetable Seeds Disease Resistance Buying List | Plant health | Scoop.it

The use of certified vegetables seeds, resistant to certain common pathogens, is very helpful preventative measure.  Tomatoes, for example, are particularly prone to various forms of blight, while squash and pumpkin can often fall ill to powdery mildew.

 

The vegetable variety is listed first followed by the resistant diseases.

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