Plant health
Follow
3.0K views | +4 today
Plant health
Research, new developments and findings of organisms, harmful to plants.
Curated by Knapco
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

National Plant Diagnostic Network

National Plant Diagnostic Network | Plant health | Scoop.it

National Plant Diagnostic Network by University of Florida: an excellent example of on-line training, monitoring organisation and information sharing.

via @plantclinic

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

A Rapid, Sensitive Assay for Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2 in Plant and Soil Samples Using Magnetic Beads and Real-Time PCR

The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex causes economically significant diseases in many plant families worldwide. Although generally limited to the tropics and subtropics, strains designated race 3 biovar 2 (R3Bv2) cause disease in cooler tropical highlands and temperate regions. Beside real-time PCR new testing methods are presented.

Youngsil Ha et al. (2012) A Rapid, Sensitive Assay for Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2 in Plant and Soil Samples Using Magnetic Beads and Real-Time PCR, Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 2, Page 258-264, February 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-05-11-0426

Comment: Ralstonia solanacearum is a quarantine pest in Europe, USA and Canada. Its race 3 causes brown rot of potatoes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Biology and Sources of Inoculum of Geotrichum candidum Causing Sour Rot of Peach and Nectarine Fruit in California

Geotrichum candidum causes sour rot of fresh-market stone fruit such as peach and nectarine. Since 2001, the incidence of sour rot has increased in California, a semi-arid production area, which is considered atypical for the occurrence of the disease.

Nitidulid beetles and fruit flies were found to play a role in disease transmission.

The study identified sources of inoculum of G. candidum in orchards and packinghouses, and provides information to guide development of disease management.

Yaghmouri et al. (2012) Biology and Sources of Inoculum of Geotrichum candidum Causing Sour Rot of Peach and Nectarine Fruit in California.- Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 2, Page 204-210, February 2012.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-05-11-0391

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Research examines virus infection's differing effects on plants, insects - PhysOrg.com

Research examines virus infection's differing effects on plants, insects - PhysOrg.com | Plant health | Scoop.it

Tyler Sharp: Kansas State University plant pathologist Dorith Rotenberg and two students research why virus infection has differing effects on plants and insects.

 

Tomato spotted wilt virus is classified as a persistently propagative virus, which allows the virus to replicate inside the plant and insect. Thrips spreads the disease to plants by feeding on the leafy surfaces. The virus enters through the digestive tract of the insect and then replicates inside epithelial cells, which absorb nutrients.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Knapco from Food Policy News
Scoop.it!

2012 Annual Letter From Bill Gates | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

2012 Annual Letter From Bill Gates | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation | Plant health | Scoop.it
Read Bill Gates’ 2012 Annual Letter update on the Gates Foundation’s work in health, poverty, and education.


Bill Gates: "We can help poor farmers sustainably increase their productivity so they can feed themselves and their families.
But that will only happen if we prioritize agricultural innovation."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Damaging citrus plant disease confirmed in Texas

The Brownsville Herald (18 Jan 2012): Damaging citrus plant disease was for the first time confirmed in the Rio Grande Valley.

 

The same news were reported by The Monitor and Washington Examiner. A destructive citrus bacterial disease known to occure in crops in Florida has been confirmed in Texas. The citrus greening disease is spread by insect vector - citrus psyllid.  

The Texas Department of Agriculture and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service APHIS have confirmed the first detection in Texas of citrus greening, a destructive plant disease that poses a threat to the state’s citrus industry. The disease was discovered in a tree in a commercial orange grove in San Juan.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

USDA office closures impact research

USDA office closures impact research | Plant health | Scoop.it

California Farm Bureau issued alert, since USDA is consolidating and closing 259 of its offices across the USA , closing 131 Farm Service Agency offices and cut budget for reaserch in agriculture. As part of the federal government's efforts to reduce the nation's burgeoning deficit, the U.S. Department of Agriculture measures will impact also cotton research in California. Cotton farmers may loose support of researchers, working on the disease Fusarium oxysporum, specifically Race 4 of that organism, which has become "a serious problem for California's cotton industry". In addition to research on Fusarium Race 4, scientists at Shafter were also working on pest management solutions for common pests like the Lygus bug.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Research collaboration with Australian plant biosecurity center set to secure food supplies, increase academic exchanges

Research collaboration with Australian plant biosecurity center set to secure food supplies, increase academic exchanges | Plant health | Scoop.it

Research collaboration between US (Kansas State University will be the only American university involved) and Australian plant biosecurity center.


Officials at Kansas State University and at Australia's leading plant pests research center are finalizing an agreement for a collaboration aimed at increasing agricultural security in both countries.

Once formalized, the six-year partnership will pair Kansas State University plant pathology and entomology experts with those from the Australian Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre, or CRC. The center is a consortium among several of Australia's leading governmental research institutions and universities. Through this partnership, researchers will study emerging plant diseases and insect pests that threaten American and Australian agricultural systems and develop new strategies and technologies to defend against them.


NewsReleaseWire.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Distribution of Viruses Infecting Cucurbit Crops and Isolation of Potential New Virus-Like Sequences from Weeds in Oklahoma

Samples were tested against seven viruses, including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), Papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W, formerly known as Watermelon mosaic virus-1), Squash mosaic virus (SqMV), Watermelon mosaic virus-2 (WMV-2), and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), using dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA).

New weed host species were found to be infected with PRSV. Some weed species contained possible new viruses.

Ali et al. (2012) Distribution of Viruses Infecting Cucurbit Crops and Isolation of Potential New Virus-Like Sequences from Weeds in Oklahoma Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 2, Page 243-248, February 2012. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-05-11-0419

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Controlling Soybean Cyst Nematode

The Soybean Cyst Nematode. It is a major player in production, and there have been millions of dollars lost to this nematode. The Soybean Cyst Nematode has a very narrow host range.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Doctor of Plant Health Program, University of Nebraska

Doctor of Plant Health Program, University of Nebraska | Plant health | Scoop.it

The mission of the Doctor of Plant Health Program in this academic year (2011-12) at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is to produce plant practitioners with broad expertise and experience across the various disciplines that impact plant health and plant management. These plant practitioners (plant doctors) will integrate from across this expertise to diagnose and solve plant health problems and to develop integrated plant and pest management systems that maximize the system’s economic, environmental, and social sustainability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Invasive Wasp Discovered in Southern California

Invasive Wasp Discovered in Southern California | Plant health | Scoop.it
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – In August 2010, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside discovered a tiny fairyfly wasp in upstate New York that had never been seen in the United States until then.


Serguei Triapitsyn, the principal museum scientist in the Department of Entomology and the director of the Entomology Research Museum, who made the discovery identified the wasp as Gonatocerus ater by comparing it to wasps from upstate New York and also Europe. The wasp is found wherever Lombardy poplars were located because the wasp' life cycle is associated with a leafhopper host, which prefers these trees for feeding. According to Triapitsyn, the wasp poses no known risk – besides killing leafhopper eggs.

The new was reported also by Science News: Wasp found in upstate New York shows up in Southern California.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Eradication program wins out against destructive boll weevil - Brownsville Herald

Eradication program wins out against destructive boll weevil - Brownsville Herald | Plant health | Scoop.it

Boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is a beetle, which feeds on cotton buds and flowers.

The Brownsville Herald. By Steve CLARK: MyFox Houston Eradication program wins out against destructive boll weevil. Perhaps it's fitting that the boll weevil's last stand is taking place in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, since it was here — near Brownsville — in the 1890s that a little pest with a big appetite first crossed into the continental United States from Mexico....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Knapco
Scoop.it!

Arizona Veg IPM: foxglove aphid and lettuce dieback

Arizona Veg IPM: foxglove aphid and lettuce dieback | Plant health | Scoop.it

Western Farm Press, Arizona Vegetable Integrated Pest Management: foxglove aphid, lettuce dieback, seed crop weed control.

Until recently, aphid pressure has been relatively light in most areas throughout the desert Southwest. There have been a few reports of alate (winged) green peach aphids on a few plants with minimal colonization. Identification of aphids from a celery field in the Yuma Valley confirmed findings of foxglove aphids Aulacorthum solani. Aphids usually occur in a humid environment and are often reason for pesticide use. Several aphid species may occur during the winter and spring growing seasons. See more ...

more...
No comment yet.