Plant health
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Plant health
Research, new developments and findings of organisms, harmful to plants.
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First Report of Agrobacterium vitis as the Causal Agent of Grapevine Crown Gall in Serbia

First Report of Agrobacterium vitis as the Causal Agent of Grapevine Crown Gall in Serbia | Plant health | Scoop.it

In 2010, a serious outbreak of crown gall disease was observed on 3-year-old grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) cv. Cabernet Sauvignon in two commercial vineyards located in the South Banat District in Serbia. In Plant Pathology laboratory at University of Belgrade Agrobacterium vitis was identified as causal agent of crown galls by several molecular, biochemical and bioassay methods.

Kuzmanović et al. (2012) First Report of Agrobacterium vitis as the Causal Agent of Grapevine Crown Gall in Serbia, Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 2, Page 286, February 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-07-11-0600

Comment: Despite the authors claim the first report of A. vitis in Serbia, they wrote that crown gall disease had been sporadically observed in vineyards in Serbia in previous years. Indeed, the disease is well established in this part of Europe. Usually the reason for an outbreak in a young plantation is an introduction of latently infected planting material. Though, source of infection is probably in mother plants.

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Quorum-sensing disruption, a new tool for disease management?

Quorum-sensing disruption, a new tool for disease management? | Plant health | Scoop.it

Sara Thomas (Plantwise) sais that the potential applications of this idea are truly fascinating.

 

A new study by Chernin et al. has found that volatile organic compounds produced by certain Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) can disrupt bacterial cell-cell communication (quorum sensing) in a number of plant pathogens.  These volatile compounds can reduce the signal molecules of pathogens (E. g. volatile organic compounds produced by strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Serratia plymuthica can disrupt quorum sensing in a number of plant pathogens including Agrobacterium, Chromobacterium, Pectobacterium and Pseudomonas). Since PGPRs are used as agricultural inputs in many crops, ‘quorum-quenching’ could serve as a new disease management strategy.

 

The potential of this tool was further broadened when Gadoury et al., suggested a similar quorum-sensing mechanism to exist in the grape powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe necator. The authors indicate that production of spores (conidia) is triggered only after the fungus has grown some amount of mycelium and suggested the role of quorum sensing in triggering this conidiation. This is the first suggestion of quorum-sensing in fungal plant pathogens.

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