Plant Gravitropism
52 views | +0 today
Follow
Plant Gravitropism
How those green buggers sense gravity has intrigued us forever.... Thankfully research is on the rise
Curated by Rahul Roy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rahul Roy from Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
Scoop.it!

Root Architecture Responses: In Search of Phosphate

Root Architecture Responses: In Search of Phosphate | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it

Soil phosphate represents the only source of phosphorus for plants and, consequently, is its entry into the trophic chain. This major component of nucleic acids, phospholipids, and energy currency of the cell (ATP) can limit plant growth because of its low mobility in soil. As a result, root responses to low phosphate favor the exploration of the shallower part of the soil, where phosphate tends to be more abundant, a strategy described as topsoil foraging. We will review the diverse developmental strategies that can be observed among plants by detailing the effect of phosphate deficiency on primary and lateral roots. We also discuss the formation of cluster roots: an advanced adaptive strategy to cope with low phosphate availability observed in a limited number of species. Finally, we will put this work into perspective for future research directions.

 

 


Via Christophe Jacquet, Jennifer Mach
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rahul Roy from ROOTBOARD
Scoop.it!

Role of actin cytoskeleton in brassinosteroid signaling and in its integration with the auxin response in plants (Developmental Cell)

Role of actin cytoskeleton in brassinosteroid signaling and in its integration with the auxin response in plants (Developmental Cell) | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it

In plants, developmental programs and tropisms are modulated by the phytohormone auxin. Auxin reconfigures the actin cytoskeleton, which controls polar localization of auxin transporters such as PIN2 and thus determines cell-type-specific responses. In conjunction with a second growth-promoting phytohormone, brassinosteroid (BR), auxin synergistically enhances growth and gene transcription. We show that BR alters actin configuration and PIN2 localization in a manner similar to that of auxin. We describe a BR constitutive-response mutant that bears an allele of the ACTIN2 gene and shows altered actin configuration, PIN2 delocalization, and a broad array of phenotypes that recapitulate BR-treated plants. Moreover, we show that actin filament reconfiguration is sufficient to activate BR signaling, which leads to an enhanced auxin response. Our results demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton functions as an integration node for the BR signaling pathway and auxin responsiveness.


Via GMI Vienna, PMG, Jean-Pierre Zryd, ROOTSPROUT
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

Using Flatbed Scanners to Collect High-resolution ... | Video Protocol

Using Flatbed Scanners to Collect High-resolution ... | Video Protocol | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
Imaging platforms used to measure the root gravitropic response can be expensive, relatively low in throughput, and/or labor intensive. These issues have been addressed by developing a high-throughput image capture ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

How Plants Set Angles of Their Branches - Fars News Agency

How Plants Set Angles of Their Branches - Fars News Agency | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
Fars News Agency How Plants Set Angles of Their Branches Fars News Agency If a plant is put on its side, these branches will begin a phase of bending growth, known as gravitropism, that reorientates them back toward their original angle of growth...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

Roots Down, Shoots Up. But How Does a Plant Know Which is Which? - Scientific American (blog)

Scientific American (blog)
Roots Down, Shoots Up. But How Does a Plant Know Which is Which?
Scientific American (blog)
Scientists have a a name for this phenomenon: gravitropism. What they lack is a complete explanation of how it works.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

Asymmetric gibberellin signaling regulates vacuolar trafficking of PIN auxin transporters during root gravitropism

RT @plantbiology: PNAS 'GA-auxin cross-talk during gravitropism' http://t.co/ai8n4196
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

SCFTIR1/AFB-auxin signalling regulates PIN vacuolar trafficking and auxin fluxes during root gravitropism : Abstract : The EMBO Journal | plant developments

SCFTIR1/AFB-auxin signalling regulates PIN vacuolar trafficking and auxin fluxes during root gravitropism : Abstract : The EMBO Journal | plant developments | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
The EMBO Journal encourages and publishes articles that report novel findings of wide biological significance in the areas of development, immunology, neuroscience, plant biology, structural biology, genomic & computational biology, genome...PMG's...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

Circumnutation on the water surface: female flowers ... [Sci Rep. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Circumnutation on the water surface: female flowers ... [Sci Rep. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
PubMed comprises more than 22 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rahul Roy from Arabidopsis
Scoop.it!

The SAUR19 subfamily of SMALL AUXIN UP RNA genes promote cell expansion (Plant Journal)

The SAUR19 subfamily of SMALL AUXIN UP RNA genes promote cell expansion (Plant Journal) | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it

The plant hormone auxin controls numerous aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of hundreds of genes. SMALL AUXIN UP RNA (SAUR) genes comprise the largest family of auxin responsive genes, but their function is unknown. Although prior studies have correlated the expression of some SAUR genes with auxin-mediated cell expansion, genetic evidence implicating SAURs in cell expansion has not been reported. The Arabidopsis SAUR19, SAUR20, SAUR21, SAUR22, SAUR23, and SAUR24 (SAUR19-24) genes encode a subgroup of closely related SAUR proteins. We demonstrate that these SAUR proteins are highly unstable in Arabidopsis. However, the addition of an N-terminal GFP or epitope tag dramatically increases SAUR protein stability. Expression of these stabilized SAUR fusion proteins in Arabidopsis confers numerous auxin-related phenotypes indicative of increased and/or unregulated cell expansion, including increased hypocotyl and leaf size, defective apical hook maintenance, and altered tropic responses. Furthermore, seedlings expressing an artificial microRNA targeting multiple members of the SAUR19-24 subfamily exhibit short hypocotyls and reduced leaf size. Together, these findings demonstrate that SAUR19-24 function as positive effectors of cell expansion. This regulation may be achieved through the modulation of auxin transport, as SAUR gain-of-function and loss-of-function seedlings exhibit increased and reduced basipetal IAA transport, respectively. Consistent with this possibility, SAUR19-24 proteins predominantly localize to the plasma membrane.


Via GMI Vienna
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | A Unifying Modeling of Plant Shoot Gravitropism With an Explicit Account of the Effects of Growth | Plant Biophysics and Modeling

Gravitropism, the slow reorientation of plant growth in response to gravity, is a major determinant of the form and posture of land plants. Recently a universal model of shoot gravitropism, the AC ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

The secret to how plants set branch angles - Futurity: Research News

The secret to how plants set branch angles Futurity: Research News If a plant is put on its side, these branches will begin a phase of bending growth, known as gravitropism, that reorientates them back toward their original angle of growth relative...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rahul Roy from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Scoop.it!

Plant Cell: A Spatio-Temporal Understanding of Growth Regulation during the Salt Stress Response in Arabidopsis

Plant Cell: A Spatio-Temporal Understanding of Growth Regulation during the Salt Stress Response in Arabidopsis | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it

"Plant environmental responses involve dynamic changes in growth and signaling, yet little is understood as to how progress through these events is regulated. Here, we explored the phenotypic and transcriptional events involved in the acclimation of the Arabidopsis thaliana seedling root to a rapid change in salinity. Using live-imaging analysis, we show that growth is dynamically regulated with a period of quiescence followed by recovery then homeostasis. Through the use of a new high-resolution spatio-temporal transcriptional map, we identify the key hormone signaling pathways that regulate specific transcriptional programs, predict their spatial domain of action, and link the activity of these pathways to the regulation of specific phases of growth."


Via Mary Williams
more...
Mary Williams's curator insight, July 3, 2013 3:22 AM

Wow! An amazing description of a root responding to a stressful shift in its environment. All those cells perceiving physicochemical and molecular signals, communicating amongst themselves and signaling to each other - biology at its most beautiful!

Rescooped by Rahul Roy from Plant Gravitropism
Scoop.it!

Asymmetric gibberellin signaling regulates vacuolar trafficking of PIN auxin transporters during root gravitropism

RT @plantbiology: PNAS 'GA-auxin cross-talk during gravitropism' http://t.co/ai8n4196
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and ...

How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and ... | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
"Although the process of gravitropism—defined as the downward growth of the plant root so it can explore the soil better for nutrients and water and the upward growth of the plant shoots to maximize light absorption—appears ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rahul Roy
Scoop.it!

How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and the ... - Eureka! Science News

How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and the ... - Eureka! Science News | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it
Eureka! Science News
How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and the ...
Eureka!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rahul Roy from Plant Cell Biology
Scoop.it!

Bacterial Compasses « Thoughtomics

Bacterial Compasses « Thoughtomics | Plant Gravitropism | Scoop.it

Magnetosomes are little membrane bound particles which are found in certain bacteria. These particles contain magnetite crystals which, as well as making them sound like very small X-men, allow the bacteria to line up in the direction of the earth’s geomagnetic field, essentially acting like a compass. Why this is helpfully is not entirely certain, but it may give help to give the bacteria a sense of direction while searching for a suitable environment in which to live.


Via Anne Osterrieder
more...
No comment yet.