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Identification of a Plant Viral RNA Genome in the Nucleus

Identification of a Plant Viral RNA Genome in the Nucleus | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it

Abstract Top

Viruses contain either DNA or RNA as genomes. DNA viruses replicate within nucleus, while most RNA viruses, especially (+)-sense single-stranded RNA, replicate and are present within cytoplasm. We proposed a new thought that is contrary to the common notion that (+)-sense single-stranded RNA viruses are present only in the cytoplasm. In this study, we question whether the genome of a plant RNA virus (non-retroviral) is present in the nucleus of infected cells? Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) RNA was detected in the nucleus of infected cells, as shown by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Western blot using anti-histone 3 and anti-phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase showed that nuclei were highly purified from mock and HCRSV-infected kenaf (Hibiscus cannabilis L.) leaves, respectively. The p23 and HCRSV coat protein (CP) coding regions were both amplified from total RNA extracted from isolated nuclei. Viral RNA in the nucleus may be used to generate viral microRNAs (vir-miRNAs), as five putative vir-miRNAs were predicted from HCRSV using the vir-miRNAs prediction database. The vir-miRNA (hcrsv-miR-H1-5p) was detected using TaqMan® stem-loop real-time PCR, and by northern blot using DIG-end labeled probe in HCRSV-infected kenaf leaves. Finally, a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) was discovered in p23 of HCRSV. The NLS interacts with importin α and facilitates viral RNA genome to enter nucleus. We demonstrate the presence of a (+)-sense single-stranded viral RNA within nucleus.

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Transcriptome variation along bud development in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.)

Transcriptome variation along bud development in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Vegetative buds provide plants in temperate environments the possibility for growth and reproduction when environmental conditions are favorable. In grapevine, crucial developmental events take place within buds during two growing seasons in consecutive years. The first season, the shoot apical meristem within the bud differentiates all the basic elements of the shoot including flowering transition in lateral primordia and development of inflorescence primordia. These events practically end with bud dormancy. The second season, buds resume shoot growth associated to flower formation and development. Gene expression has been previously monitored at specific stages of bud development but has never been followed along the two growing seasons.

Results

Gene expression changes were analyzed along the bud annual cycle at eight different time points. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) revealed that the main factors explaining the global gene expression differences were the processes of bud dormancy and active growth as well as stress responses. Accordingly, non dormant buds showed an enrichment in functional categories typical of actively proliferating and growing cells together with the over abundance of transcripts belonging to stress response pathways. Differential expression analyses performed between consecutive time points indicated that major transcriptional changes were associated to para/endodormancy, endo/ecodormancy and ecodormancy/bud break transitions. Transcripts encoding key regulators of reproductive development were grouped in three major expression clusters corresponding to: (i) transcripts associated to flowering induction, (ii) transcripts associated to flower meristem specification and initiation and (iii) transcripts putatively involved in dormancy. Within this cluster, a MADS-box gene (VvFLC2) and other transcripts with similar expression patterns could participate in dormancy regulation.

Conclusions

This work provides a global view of major transcriptional changes taking place along bud development in grapevine, highlighting those molecular and biological functions involved in the main events of bud development. As reported in other woody species, the results suggest that genes regulating flowering could also be involved in dormancy regulatory pathways in grapevine.

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Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway

Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the G[agr], G[bgr], and G[ggr] subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the G[bgr] subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals1, 2. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive1. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thalianainvolving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease–G-protein–RACK1–MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  
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From the principles of genomic data sharing to the practices of data access committees

From the principles of genomic data sharing to the practices of data access committees | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Sharing genomic research data through controlled-access databases has increased in recent years. Policymakers and funding organizations endorse genomic data sharing in order to optimize the use of public funds and to increase the statistical power of databases. Well-established data access arrangements and data access committees (DACs)—responsible for reviewing and managing requests for access to genomic databases—are therefore central for implementing the policies and principles of data sharing. This article aims to investigate the functionality of DACs through the perspective of existing practices.
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Sharing genomic research data through controlled-access databases has increased in recent years. Policymakers and funding organizations endorse genomic data sharing in order to optimize the use of public funds and to increase the statistical power of databases. Well-established data access arrangements and data access committees (DACs)—responsible for reviewing and managing requests for access to genomic databases—are therefore central for implementing the policies and principles of data sharing. This article aims to investigate the functionality of DACs through the perspective of existing practices.

  
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Comparative proteomic analysis of early salt stress responsive proteins in roots and leaves of rice.

Proteomics. 2014 Aug;14(15):1759-75. doi: 10.1002/pmic.201300276. Epub 2014 Jul 7. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Growth and productivity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) are severely affected by salinity. Understanding the mechanisms that protect rice and other important cereal crops from salt stress will help in the development of salt-stress-tolerant strains. In this study, rice seedlings of the same genetic species with various salt tolerances were studied. We first used 2DE to resolve the expressed proteome in rice roots and leaves and then used nanospray liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differentially expressed proteins in rice seedlings after salt treatment. The 2DE assays revealed that there were 104 differentially expressed protein spots in rice roots and 59 in leaves. Then, we identified 83 proteins in rice roots and 61 proteins in rice leaves by MS analysis. Functional classification analysis revealed that the differentially expressed proteins from roots could be classified into 18 functional categories while those from leaves could be classified into 11 functional categories. The proteins from rice seedlings that most significantly contributed to a protective effect against increased salinity were cysteine synthase, adenosine triphosphate synthase, quercetin 3-O-methyltransferase 1, and lipoxygenase 2. Further analysis demonstrated that the primary mechanisms underlying the ability of rice seedlings to tolerate salt stress were glycolysis, purine metabolism, and photosynthesis. Thus, we suggest that differentially expressed proteins may serve as marker group for the salt tolerance of rice.

 
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Transcriptomic screening for cyclotides and other cysteine-rich proteins in the metallophyte Viola baoshanensis.

J Plant Physiol. 2015 Feb 26;178:17-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jplph.2015.01.017. [Epub ahead of print]
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Cysteine (Cys)-rich proteins (CRPs) are frequently associated with plant defense and stress resistance. Viola baoshanensis is a cadmium (Cd) hyper-accumulating plant whose CRPs-based defense systems are so far poorly understood. Next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques and a specialist searching tool, CrpExcel, were employed for identifying CRPs in V. baoshanensis. The transcriptome sequences of V. baoshanensis were assembled primarily from 454FLX/Hiseq2000 reads of plant cDNA sequencing libraries. CrpExcel was then used to search the ORFs and 9687 CRPs were identified, and included zinc finger (ZF) proteins, lipid transfer proteins, thaumatins and cyclotide precursors. Real-time PCR results showed that all CRP genes tested are constitutively expressed, but the genes of defensive peptides showed greater up-regulated expression than those of ZF-proteins in Cd- and/or wounding (Wd) treatments of V. baoshanensis seedlings. The NGS-derived sequences of cyclotide precursor genes were verified by RT-PCR and ABI3730 sequencing studies, and 32 novel cyclotides were identified in V. baoshanensis. In general, the metal-binding sites of ZF-containing CRPs also represented the potential vulnerable targets of toxic metals. This study provides broad insights into CRPs-based defense systems and stress-vulnerable targets in V. baoshanensis. It now brings the number of cyclotide sequences in V. baoshanensis to 53 and based on projections from this work, the number of cyclotides in the Violaceae is now conservatively estimated to be >30000.

 
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Phenotype and transcriptome analysis reveals chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis together influenced the leaf color formation in mutants of Anthurium andraeanum ‘Sonate’ | ...

Leaf color is one of the well-sought traits in breeding program for Anthurium andraeanum Lind. Knowledge of mechanisms in anthuriums to produce leaves with different shades of green would help to effectively select desirable traits. In this study, the micro- and ultra-structural and physiological features of leaves on wild type and leaf color mutants (dark green, rubescent, etiolated, albino) in A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ were analyzed. Results show that chloroplasts of leaf color mutants exhibited abnormal morphology and distribution. Using next generation sequencing technology followed by de novo assembly, leaf transcriptomes comprising of 41,017 unigenes with an average sequence length of 768 bp were produced from wild type and rubescent mutant. From the 27,539 (67.1%) unigenes with annotated functions, 858 significantly differently expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, consisting of 446 up-regulated genes and 412 down-regulated genes. Genes that affect chloroplasts development and division, and chlorophyll biosynthesis were included in the down-regulated DEGs. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated that the expression level of those genes was significantly lower in the rubescent, etiolated, and albino mutant compared to wild type plants, which concurs with the differences in micro- and ultra-structures and physiological features between these two types of plants. Conclusively, the leaf color formation is greatly affected by the activity of chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis. And the possible formation pathway of leaf color mutant of A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ is deduced based on our results.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Leaf color is one of the well-sought traits in breeding program for Anthurium andraeanum Lind. Knowledge of mechanisms in anthuriums to produce leaves with different shades of green would help to effectively select desirable traits. In this study, the micro- and ultra-structural and physiological features of leaves on wild type and leaf color mutants (dark green, rubescent, etiolated, albino) in A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ were analyzed. Results show that chloroplasts of leaf color mutants exhibited abnormal morphology and distribution. Using next generation sequencing technology followed by de novo assembly, leaf transcriptomes comprising of 41,017 unigenes with an average sequence length of 768 bp were produced from wild type and rubescent mutant. From the 27,539 (67.1%) unigenes with annotated functions, 858 significantly differently expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, consisting of 446 up-regulated genes and 412 down-regulated genes. Genes that affect chloroplasts development and division, and chlorophyll biosynthesis were included in the down-regulated DEGs. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated that the expression level of those genes was significantly lower in the rubescent, etiolated, and albino mutant compared to wild type plants, which concurs with the differences in micro- and ultra-structures and physiological features between these two types of plants. Conclusively, the leaf color formation is greatly affected by the activity of chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis. And the possible formation pathway of leaf color mutant of A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ is deduced based on our results.

  
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A Massive Expansion of Effector Genes Underlies Gall-Formation in the Wheat Pest Mayetiola destructor

A Massive Expansion of Effector Genes Underlies Gall-Formation in the Wheat Pest Mayetiola destructor | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Gall-forming arthropods are highly specialized herbivores that, in combination with their hosts, produce extended phenotypes with unique morphologies [1]. Many are economically important, and others have improved our understanding of ecology and adaptive radiation [2]. However, the mechanisms that these arthropods use to induce plant galls are poorly understood. We sequenced the genome of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor; Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a plant parasitic gall midge and a pest of wheat (Triticum spp.), with the aim of identifying genic modifications that contribute to its plant-parasitic lifestyle. Among several adaptive modifications, we discovered an expansive reservoir of potential effector proteins. Nearly 5% of the 20,163 predicted gene models matched putative effector gene transcripts present in the M. destructor larval salivary gland. Another 466 putative effectors were discovered among the genes that have no sequence similarities in other organisms. The largest known arthropod gene family (family SSGP-71) was also discovered within the effector reservoir. SSGP-71 proteins lack sequence homologies to other proteins, but their structures resemble both ubiquitin E3 ligases in plants and E3-ligase-mimicking effectors in plant pathogenic bacteria. SSGP-71 proteins and wheat Skp proteins interact in vivo. Mutations in different SSGP-71 genes avoid the effector-triggered immunity that is directed by the wheat resistance genes H6 and H9. Results point to effectors as the agents responsible for arthropod-induced plant gall formation.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Gall-forming arthropods are highly specialized herbivores that, in combination with their hosts, produce extended phenotypes with unique morphologies [1]. Many are economically important, and others have improved our understanding of ecology and adaptive radiation [2]. However, the mechanisms that these arthropods use to induce plant galls are poorly understood. We sequenced the genome of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor; Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a plant parasitic gall midge and a pest of wheat (Triticumspp.), with the aim of identifying genic modifications that contribute to its plant-parasitic lifestyle. Among several adaptive modifications, we discovered an expansive reservoir of potential effector proteins. Nearly 5% of the 20,163 predicted gene models matched putative effector gene transcripts present in theM. destructor larval salivary gland. Another 466 putative effectors were discovered among the genes that have no sequence similarities in other organisms. The largest known arthropod gene family (family SSGP-71) was also discovered within the effector reservoir. SSGP-71 proteins lack sequence homologies to other proteins, but their structures resemble both ubiquitin E3 ligases in plants and E3-ligase-mimicking effectors in plant pathogenic bacteria. SSGP-71 proteins and wheat Skp proteins interact in vivo. Mutations in different SSGP-71 genes avoid the effector-triggered immunity that is directed by the wheat resistance genes H6 and H9. Results point to effectors as the agents responsible for arthropod-induced plant gall formation.

   
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Towards social acceptance of plant breeding by genome editing

Towards social acceptance of plant breeding by genome editing | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Towards social acceptance of plant breeding by genome editing
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Although genome-editing technologies facilitate efficient plant breeding without introducing a transgene, it is creating indistinct boundaries in the regulation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Rapid advances in plant breeding by genome-editing require the establishment of a new global policy for the new biotechnology, while filling the gap between process-based and product-based GMO regulations. In this Opinion article we review recent developments in producing major crops using genome-editing, and we propose a regulatory model that takes into account the various methodologies to achieve genetic modifications as well as the resulting types of mutation. Moreover, we discuss the future integration of genome-editing crops into society, specifically a possible response to the ‘Right to Know’ movement which demands labeling of food that contains genetically engineered ingredients.

 
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The Effect on the Transcriptome of Anemone coronaria following Infection with Rust ( Tranzschelia discolor )

The Effect on the Transcriptome of  Anemone coronaria  following Infection with Rust ( Tranzschelia discolor ) | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
In order to understand plant/pathogen interaction, the transcriptome of uninfected (1S) and infected (2I) plant was sequenced at 3’end by the GS FLX 454 platform. De novo assembly of high-quality reads generated 27,231 contigs leaving 37,191 singletons in the 1S and 38,393 in the 2I libraries. ESTcalc tool suggested that 71% of the transcriptome had been captured, with 99% of the genes present being represented by at least one read. Unigene annotation showed that 50.5% of the predicted transl
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In order to understand plant/pathogen interaction, the transcriptome of uninfected (1S) and infected (2I) plant was sequenced at 3’end by the GS FLX 454 platform. De novo assembly of high-quality reads generated 27,231 contigs leaving 37,191 singletons in the 1S and 38,393 in the 2I libraries. ESTcalc tool suggested that 71% of the transcriptome had been captured, with 99% of the genes present being represented by at least one read. Unigene annotation showed that 50.5% of the predicted translation products shared significant homology with protein sequences in GenBank. In all 253 differential transcript abundance (DTAs) were in higher abundance and 52 in lower abundance in the 2I library. 128 higher abundance DTA genes were of fungal origin and 49 were clearly plant sequences. A tBLASTn-based search of the sequences using as query the full length predicted polypeptide product of 50 R genes identified 16 R gene products. Only one R gene (PGIP) was up-regulated. The response of the plant to fungal invasion included the up-regulation of several pathogenesis related protein (PR) genes involved in JA signaling and other genes associated with defense response and down regulation of cell wall associated genes, non-race-specific disease resistance1 (NDR1) and other genes like myb, presqualene diphosphate phosphatase (PSDPase), a UDP-glycosyltransferase 74E2-like (UGT). The DTA genes identified here should provide a basis for understanding the A. coronaria/T. discolor interaction and leads for biotechnology-based disease resistance breeding.

  
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MOROKOSHI: Transcriptome Database in Sorghum bicolor

MOROKOSHI: Transcriptome Database in Sorghum bicolor | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
In transcriptome analysis, accurate annotation of each transcriptional unit and its expression profile is essential. A full-length cDNA (FL-cDNA) collection facilitates the refinement of transcriptional annotation, and accurate transcription start sites help to unravel transcriptional regulation. We constructed a normalized FL-cDNA library from eight growth stages of aerial tissues in Sorghum bicolor and isolated 37,607 clones. These clones were Sanger sequenced from the 5′ and/or 3′ ends and in total 38,981 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. About one-third of the transcripts of known genes were captured as FL-cDNA clone resources. In addition to these, we also annotated 272 novel genes, 323 antisense transcripts and 1,672 candidate isoforms. These clones are available from the RIKEN Bioresource Center. After obtaining accurate annotation of transcriptional units, we performed expression profile analysis. We carried out spikelet-, seed- and stem-specific RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and confirmed the expression of 70.6% of the newly identified genes. We also downloaded 23 sorghum RNA-Seq samples that are publicly available and these are shown on a genome browser together with our original FL-cDNA and RNA-Seq data. Using our original and publicly available data, we made an expression profile of each gene and identified the top 20 genes with the most similar expression. In addition, we visualized their relationships in gene co-expression networks. Users can access and compare various transcriptome data from S, bicolor at http://sorghum.riken.jp.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

In transcriptome analysis, accurate annotation of each transcriptional unit and its expression profile is essential. A full-length cDNA (FL-cDNA) collection facilitates the refinement of transcriptional annotation, and accurate transcription start sites help to unravel transcriptional regulation. We constructed a normalized FL-cDNA library from eight growth stages of aerial tissues in Sorghum bicolor and isolated 37,607 clones. These clones were Sanger sequenced from the 5′ and/or 3′ ends and in total 38,981 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. About one-third of the transcripts of known genes were captured as FL-cDNA clone resources. In addition to these, we also annotated 272 novel genes, 323 antisense transcripts and 1,672 candidate isoforms. These clones are available from the RIKEN Bioresource Center. After obtaining accurate annotation of transcriptional units, we performed expression profile analysis. We carried out spikelet-, seed- and stem-specific RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and confirmed the expression of 70.6% of the newly identified genes. We also downloaded 23 sorghum RNA-Seq samples that are publicly available and these are shown on a genome browser together with our original FL-cDNA and RNA-Seq data. Using our original and publicly available data, we made an expression profile of each gene and identified the top 20 genes with the most similar expression. In addition, we visualized their relationships in gene co-expression networks. Users can access and compare various transcriptome data fromS, bicolor at http://sorghum.riken.jp.

 
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Optimal assembly strategies of transcriptome related to ploidies of eukaryotic organisms

Several de novo transcriptome assemblers have been developed recently to assemble the short reads generated from the next-generation sequencing platforms and different strategies were employed for assembling transcriptomes of various eukaryotes without genome sequences. Though there are some comparisons among these de novo assembly tools for assembling transcriptomes of different eukaryotic organisms, there is no report about the relationship between assembly strategies and ploidies of the organisms.
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AbstractBackground

Several de novo transcriptome assemblers have been developed recently to assemble the short reads generated from the next-generation sequencing platforms and different strategies were employed for assembling transcriptomes of various eukaryotes without genome sequences. Though there are some comparisons among these de novo assembly tools for assembling transcriptomes of different eukaryotic organisms, there is no report about the relationship between assembly strategies and ploidies of the organisms.

Results

When we de novo assembled transcriptomes of sweet potato (hexaploid), Trametes gallica (a diploid fungus), Oryza meyeriana (a diploid wild rice), five assemblers, including Edena, Oases, Soaptrans, IDBA-tran and Trinity, were used in different strategies (Single-Assembler Single-Parameter, SASP; Single-Assembler Multiple-Parameters, SAMP; Combined De novo Transcriptome Assembly, CDTA, that is multiple assembler multiple parameter). It was found that CDTA strategy has the best performance compared with other two strategies for assembling transcriptome of the hexaploid sweet potato, whereas SAMP strategy with assembler Oases is better than other strategies for assembling transcriptomes of diploid fungus and the wild rice transcriptomes.

Conclusion

Based on the results from ours and others, it is suggested that CDTA strategy is better used for transcriptome assembly of polyploidy organisms and SAMP strategy of Oases is outperformed for those diploid organisms without genome sequences.

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Hybrid data acquisition and processing strategies with increased throughput and selectivity: pSMART analysis for global qualitative and quantitative analysis

J Proteome Res. 2014 Dec 5;13(12):5415-30. doi: 10.1021/pr5003017. Epub 2014 Oct 14.
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Data-dependent acquisition (DDA) and data-independent acquisition strategies (DIA) have both resulted in improved understanding of proteomics samples. Both strategies have advantages and disadvantages that are well-published, where DDA is typically applied for deep discovery and DIA may be used to create sample records. In this paper, we present a hybrid data acquisition and processing strategy (pSMART) that combines the strengths of both techniques and provides significant benefits for qualitative and quantitative peptide analysis. The performance of pSMART is compared to published DIA strategies in an experiment that allows the objective assessment of DIA performance with respect to interrogation of previously acquired MS data. The results of this experiment demonstrate that pSMART creates fewer decoy hits than a standard DIA strategy. Moreover, we show that pSMART is more selective, sensitive, and reproducible than either standard DIA or DDA strategies alone.

  
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Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Resistant Host Responses in Arachis diogoi Challenged with Late Leaf Spot Pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata

Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Resistant Host Responses in  Arachis diogoi  Challenged with Late Leaf Spot Pathogen,  Phaeoisariopsis personata | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
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Late leaf spot is a serious disease of peanut caused by the imperfect fungus, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Wild diploid species, Arachis diogoi. is reported to be highly resistant to this disease and asymptomatic. The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular responses of the wild peanut challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen using cDNA-AFLP and 2D proteomic study. A total of 233 reliable, differentially expressed genes were identified in Arachis diogoi. About one third of the TDFs exhibit no significant similarity with the known sequences in the data bases. Expressed sequence tag data showed that the characterized genes are involved in conferring resistance in the wild peanut to the pathogen challenge. Several genes for proteins involved in cell wall strengthening, hypersensitive cell death and resistance related proteins have been identified. Genes identified for other proteins appear to function in metabolism, signal transduction and defence. Nineteen TDFs based on the homology analysis of genes associated with defence, signal transduction and metabolism were further validated by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in resistant wild species in comparison with a susceptible peanut genotype in time course experiments. The proteins corresponding to six TDFs were differentially expressed at protein level also. Differentially expressed TDFs and proteins in wild peanut indicate its defence mechanism upon pathogen challenge and provide initial breakthrough of genes possibly involved in recognition events and early signalling responses to combat the pathogen through subsequent development of resistivity. This is the first attempt to elucidate the molecular basis of the response of the resistant genotype to the late leaf spot pathogen, and its defence mechanism.

  
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Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing Landscapes Modulated during Plant-Virus Interactions in Brachypodium distachyon

Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing Landscapes Modulated during Plant-Virus Interactions in Brachypodium distachyon | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
In eukaryotes, alternative splicing (AS) promotes transcriptome and proteome diversity. The extent of genome-wide AS changes occurring during a plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing, we generated an isoform-level spliceome map of Brachypodium distachyon infected with Panicum mosaic virus and its satellite virus. Overall, we detected ∼44,443 transcripts in B. distachyon, ∼30% more than those annotated in the reference genome. Expression of ∼28,900 transcripts was ≥2 fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped fragments, and ∼42% of multi-exonic genes were alternatively spliced. Comparative analysis of AS patterns in B. distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Arabidopsis thaliana, potato (Solanum tuberosum), Medicago truncatula, and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) revealed conserved ratios of the AS types between monocots and dicots. Virus infection quantitatively altered AS events in Brachypodium with little effect on the AS ratios. We discovered AS events for >100 immune-related genes encoding receptor-like kinases, NB-LRR resistance proteins, transcription factors, RNA silencing, and splicing-associated proteins. Cloning and molecular characterization of SCL33, a serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, identified multiple novel intron-retaining splice variants that are developmentally regulated and modulated during virus infection. B. distachyon SCL33 splicing patterns are also strikingly conserved compared with a distant Arabidopsis SCL33 ortholog. This analysis provides new insights into AS landscapes conserved among monocots and dicots and uncovered AS events in plant defense-related genes.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

In eukaryotes, alternative splicing (AS) promotes transcriptome and proteome diversity. The extent of genome-wide AS changes occurring during a plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing, we generated an isoform-level spliceome map of Brachypodium distachyon infected with Panicum mosaic virus and its satellite virus. Overall, we detected ∼44,443 transcripts in B. distachyon, ∼30% more than those annotated in the reference genome. Expression of ∼28,900 transcripts was ≥2 fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped fragments, and ∼42% of multi-exonic genes were alternatively spliced. Comparative analysis of AS patterns in B. distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor),Arabidopsis thaliana, potato (Solanum tuberosum), Medicago truncatula, and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) revealed conserved ratios of the AS types between monocots and dicots. Virus infection quantitatively altered AS events in Brachypodium with little effect on the AS ratios. We discovered AS events for >100 immune-related genes encoding receptor-like kinases, NB-LRR resistance proteins, transcription factors, RNA silencing, and splicing-associated proteins. Cloning and molecular characterization of SCL33, a serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, identified multiple novel intron-retaining splice variants that are developmentally regulated and modulated during virus infection. B. distachyon SCL33 splicing patterns are also strikingly conserved compared with a distant Arabidopsis SCL33 ortholog. This analysis provides new insights into ASlandscapes conserved among monocots and dicots and uncovered AS events in plant defense-related genes.

 
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Genome-guided investigation of plant natural product biosynthesis

Genome-guided investigation of plant natural product biosynthesis | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
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The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, produces hundreds of biologically active monoterpene-derived indole alkaloid (MIA) metabolites and is the sole source of the potent, expensive anti-cancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Access to a genome sequence would enable insights into the biochemistry, control, and evolution of genes responsible for MIA biosynthesis. However, generation of a near-complete, scaffolded genome is prohibitive to small research communities due to the expense, time, and expertise required. In this study, we generated a genome assembly for C. roseus which provides a near comprehensive representation of the genic space that revealed the genomic context of key points within the MIA biosynthetic pathway including physically clustered genes, tandem gene duplication, expression subfunctionalization, and putative neofunctionalization. The genome sequence also facilitated high resolution coexpression analyses that revealed three distinct clusters of co-expression within the components of the MIA pathway. Coordinated biosynthesis of precursors and intermediates throughout the pathway appear to be a feature of vinblastine/vincristine biosynthesis. The C. roseus genome also revealed localization of enzyme-rich genic regions and transporters near known biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting how even a draft genome sequence can empower the study of high-value specialized metabolites.

  
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Transcriptomic profiling of the salt-stress response in the halophyte Halogeton glomeratus

Background Halogeton glomeratus (H. glomeratus) is an extreme halophyte that is widely distributed in arid regions, including foothills, the Gobi desert of northwest China, and the marginal loess of Central Asia. However, research on the salt-tolerant mechanisms and genes of this species are limited because of a lack of genomic sequences. In the present study, the transcriptome of H. glomeratus was analyzed using next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in salt tolerance and better understand mechanisms of salt response in the halophyte H. glomeratus. Results Illumina RNA-sequencing was performed in five sequencing libraries that were prepared from samples treated with 200 mM NaCl for 6, 12, 24, and 72 h and a control sample to investigate changes in the H. glomeratus transcriptome in response to salt stress. The de novo assembly of five transcriptomes identified 50,267 transcripts. Among these transcripts, 31,496 (62.66%) were annotated, including 44 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 128 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Compared with transcriptomes from the control and NaCl-treated samples, there were 2,223, 5,643, 7,510 and 10,908 genes that were differentially expressed after exposure to NaCl for 6, 12, 24, and 72 h, respectively. One hundred and eighteen salt-induced genes were common to at least two stages of salt stress, and 291 up-regulated genes were common to various stages of salt stress. Numerous genes that are related to ion transport, reactive oxygen species scavenging, energy metabolism, hormone-response pathways, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress appear to play a significant role in adaptation to salinity conditions in this species. The detection of expression patterns of 18 salt-induced genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were basically consistent with their changes in transcript abundance determined by RNA sequencing. Conclusions Our findings provide a genomic sequence resource for functional genetic assignments of an extreme halophyte, H. glomeratus. We believe that the transcriptome datasets will help elucidate the genetic basis of this species’ response to a salt environment and develop stress-tolerant crops based on favorable wild genetic resources.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Background Halogeton glomeratus (H. glomeratus) is an extreme halophyte that is widely distributed in arid regions, including foothills, the Gobi desert of northwest China, and the marginal loess of Central Asia. However, research on the salt-tolerant mechanisms and genes of this species are limited because of a lack of genomic sequences. In the present study, the transcriptome of H. glomeratus was analyzed using next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in salt tolerance and better understand mechanisms of salt response in the halophyte H. glomeratus. Results Illumina RNA-sequencing was performed in five sequencing libraries that were prepared from samples treated with 200 mM NaCl for 6, 12, 24, and 72 h and a control sample to investigate changes in the H. glomeratus transcriptome in response to salt stress. The de novo assembly of five transcriptomes identified 50,267 transcripts. Among these transcripts, 31,496 (62.66%) were annotated, including 44 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 128 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Compared with transcriptomes from the control and NaCl-treated samples, there were 2,223, 5,643, 7,510 and 10,908 genes that were differentially expressed after exposure to NaCl for 6, 12, 24, and 72 h, respectively. One hundred and eighteen salt-induced genes were common to at least two stages of salt stress, and 291 up-regulated genes were common to various stages of salt stress. Numerous genes that are related to ion transport, reactive oxygen species scavenging, energy metabolism, hormone-response pathways, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress appear to play a significant role in adaptation to salinity conditions in this species. The detection of expression patterns of 18 salt-induced genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were basically consistent with their changes in transcript abundance determined by RNA sequencing. Conclusions Our findings provide a genomic sequence resource for functional genetic assignments of an extreme halophyte, H. glomeratus. We believe that the transcriptome datasets will help elucidate the genetic basis of this species’ response to a salt environment and develop stress-tolerant crops based on favorable wild genetic resources.

 
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Populus×canescens grown on Cr-rich tannery waste: Comparison of leaf and root biochemical and proteomic responses.

Plant Physiol Biochem. 2015 Feb 25;90C:1-13. doi: 10.1016/j.plaphy.2015.02.014. [Epub ahead of print]
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Treatment of tannery effluents generates large amounts of sediments containing concentrated doses of metals (mainly chromium). Such waste is most commonly disposed of by landfilling, which is hazardous to the ecosystem due to Cr leaching. Afforestation of disposal sites with fast growing trees could stabilize contaminants in the soil and prevent them from spreading. The aim of this study was to examine the adaptation of Populus × canescens Sm. to tannery waste using biochemical and proteomic methods. We analyzed changes in the leaves and fine roots of poplar planted in soil or tannery waste. We found no obvious symptoms of metal stress, such as: elevated hydrogen peroxide levels or lipid peroxidation, but we observed activation of many elements of antioxidative system. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of leaves and fine roots from poplar grown on soil or tannery waste revealed increased expression of glycolytic enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis of cell wall components, changes in the levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis, stress-related proteins, proteasome subunits and methionine biosynthesis enzymes. This experiment demonstrated that proteomic analysis has the potential to link the effects of Cr-rich tannery waste with biological consequences.

 
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Gene-Expression Novelty in Allopolyploid Cotton: A Proteomic Perspective

Gene-Expression Novelty in Allopolyploid Cotton: A Proteomic Perspective | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
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Allopolyploidization is accompanied by changes in gene expression that are thought to contribute to phenotypic diversification. Here we describe global changes in the single-celled, cotton fiber proteome of two natural allopolyploid species (Gossypium hirsutum andG. barbadense) and living models of their diploid parents, using two different proteomic approaches. In total, 1323 two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) spots and 1652 identified proteins by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were quantitatively profiled during fiber elongation. Between allopolyploids and their diploid A- and D-genome progenitors, amounts of differential expression ranged from 4.4% to 12.8%. Over 80% of the allopolyploid proteome was additively expressed with respect to progenitor diploids. Interestingly, the fiber proteome of G. hirsutum resembles the parental A-genome more closely, where long spinable fiber first evolved, than does the fiber proteome of G. barbadense. More protein expression patterns were A-dominant than D-dominant in G. hirsutum, but in G. barbadense the direction of expression-level dominance switched from D-genome to A-genome during fiber development. Comparison of developmental changes between the two allopolyploid species revealed a high level of proteomic differentiation, in spite of their shared ancestry, relatively recent evolutionary divergence, and similar gross morphology. These results suggest that the two allopolyploid species have achieved superficially similar, modern fiber phenotypes through different evolutionary routes at proteome level. We also detected homoeolog-specific expression for 1,001 proteins, and present a novel approach to infer the relationship between homoeolog-specific and duplicate expression patterns. Our study provides a proteomic perspective on understanding evolutionary consequences of allopolyploidization, showing how protein expression has been altered by polyploidization and subsequently has diversified among species.

 
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Targeted Plant Genome Editing via the CRISPR/Cas9 Technology.

Methods Mol Biol. 2015;1284:239-55. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-2444-8_12.
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Targeted modification of plant genome is key for elucidating and manipulating gene functions in basic and applied plant research. The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is emerging as a powerful genome editing tool in diverse organisms. This technology utilizes an easily reprogrammable guide RNA (gRNA) to guide Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease to generate a DNA double-strand break (DSB) within an intended genomic sequence and subsequently stimulate chromosomal mutagenesis or homologous recombination near the DSB site through cellular DNA repair machineries. In this chapter, we describe the detailed procedure to design, construct, and evaluate dual gRNAs for plant codon-optimized Cas9 (pcoCas9)-mediated genome editing using Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts as model cellular systems. We also discuss strategies to apply the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generating targeted genome modifications in whole plants.

  
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Transcriptome analysis of Panax vietnamensis var. fuscidicus discovers putative ocotillol-type ginsenosides biosynthesis genes and genetic markers

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus, called "Yesanqi" in Chinese, is a new variety of P. vietnamensis, which was first found in Jinping County, the southern part of Yunnan Province, China. Compared with other Panax plants, this species contains higher content of ocotillol-type saponin, majonoside R2. Despite the pharmacological importance of ocotillol-type saponins, little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus is a suitable medicinal herbal plant species to study biosynthesis of ocotillol-type saponins. In addition, the available genomic information of this important herbal plant is lacking.
RESULTS:
To investigate the P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus transcriptome, Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform was employed. We produced 114,703,210 clean reads, assembled into 126,758 unigenes, with an average length of 1,304 bp and N50 of 2,108 bp. Among these 126,758 unigenes, 85,214 unigenes (67.23%) were annotated based on the information available from the public databases. The transcripts encoding the known enzymes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis were identified in our Illumina dataset. A full-length cDNA of three Squalene epoxidase (SE) genes were obtained using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and the expression patterns of ten unigenes were analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, 15 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely to involve in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from transcriptome sequencing of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus. We further analyzed the data and found 21,320 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 30 primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for validation of the amplification and polymorphism in 13 P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus accessions. Meanwhile, five major triterpene saponins in roots of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidicus were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD).
CONCLUSIONS:
The genomic resources generated from P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus provide new insights into the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway. This will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level. The SSR markers identified and developed in this study show genetic diversity for this important crop and will contribute to marker-assisted breeding for P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:
AbstractBACKGROUND:

P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus, called "Yesanqi" in Chinese, is a new variety of P. vietnamensis, which was first found in Jinping County, the southern part of Yunnan Province, China. Compared with other Panax plants, this species contains higher content of ocotillol-type saponin, majonoside R2. Despite the pharmacological importance of ocotillol-type saponins, little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus is a suitable medicinal herbal plant species to study biosynthesis of ocotillol-type saponins. In addition, the available genomic information of this important herbal plant is lacking.

RESULTS:

To investigate the P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus transcriptome, Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform was employed. We produced 114,703,210 clean reads, assembled into 126,758 unigenes, with an average length of 1,304 bp and N50 of 2,108 bp. Among these 126,758 unigenes, 85,214 unigenes (67.23%) were annotated based on the information available from the public databases. The transcripts encoding the known enzymes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis were identified in our Illumina dataset. A full-length cDNA of three Squalene epoxidase (SE) genes were obtained using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and the expression patterns of ten unigenes were analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, 15 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely to involve in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from transcriptome sequencing of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus. We further analyzed the data and found 21,320 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 30 primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for validation of the amplification and polymorphism in 13 P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus accessions. Meanwhile, five major triterpene saponins in roots of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidicus were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD).

CONCLUSIONS:

The genomic resources generated from P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus provide new insights into the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway. This will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level. The SSR markers identified and developed in this study show genetic diversity for this important crop and will contribute to marker-assisted breeding for P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus.

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Transcriptome dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana root penetration by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora parasitica

BMC Genomics. 2014 Jun 29;15:538. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-538. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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AbstractBACKGROUND:

Oomycetes are a group of filamentous microorganisms that includes both animal and plant pathogens and causes major agricultural losses. Phytophthora species can infect most crops and plants from natural ecosystems. Despite their tremendous economic and ecologic importance, few effective methods exist for limiting the damage caused by these species. New solutions are required, and their development will require improvements in our understanding of the molecular events governing infection by these pathogens. In this study, we characterized the genetic program activated during penetration of the plant by the soil-borne pathogen Phytophthora parasitica.

RESULTS:

Using all the P. parasitica sequences available in public databases, we generated a custom oligo-array and performed a transcriptomic analysis of the early events of Arabidopsis thaliana infection. We characterized biological stages, ranging from the appressorium-mediated penetration of the pathogen into the roots to the occurrence of first dead cells in the plant. We identified a series of sequences that were transiently modulated during host penetration. Surprisingly, we observed an overall down regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid and sugar metabolism, and an upregulation of functions controlling the transport of amino acids. We also showed that different groups of genes were expressed by P. parasitica during host penetration and the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Differential expression patterns were particularly marked for cell wall-degrading enzymes and other proteins involved in pathogenicity, including RXLR effectors. By transforming P. parasitica with a transcriptional fusion with GFP, we showed that an RXLR-ecoding gene was expressed in the appressorium and infectious hyphae during infection of the first plant cell.

CONCLUSION:

We have characterized the genetic program activated during the initial invasion of plant cells by P. parasitica. We showed that a specific set of proteins, including effectors, was mobilized for penetration and to facilitate infection. Our detection of the expression of an RXLR encoding gene by the appressorium and infection hyphae highlights a role of this structure in the manipulation of the host cells.

  
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Genome-guided investigation of plant natural product biosynthesis.

The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, produces hundreds of biologically active monoterpene-derived indole alkaloid (MIA) metabolites and is the sole source of the potent, expensive anti-cancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Access to a genome sequence would enable insights into the biochemistry, control, and evolution of genes responsible for MIA biosynthesis. However, generation of a near-complete, scaffolded genome is prohibitive to small research communities due to the expense, time, and expertise required. In this study, we generated a genome assembly for C. roseus which provides a near comprehensive representation of the genic space that revealed the genomic context of key points within the MIA biosynthetic pathway including physically clustered genes, tandem gene duplication, expression subfunctionalization, and putative neofunctionalization. The genome sequence also facilitated high resolution coexpression analyses that revealed three distinct clusters of co-expression within the components of the MIA pathway. Coordinated biosynthesis of precursors and intermediates throughout the pathway appear to be a feature of vinblastine/vincristine biosynthesis. The C. roseus genome also revealed localization of enzyme-rich genic regions and transporters near known biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting how even a draft genome sequence can empower the study of high-value specialized metabolites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, produces hundreds of biologically active monoterpene-derived indole alkaloid (MIA) metabolites and is the sole source of the potent, expensive anti-cancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Access to a genome sequence would enable insights into the biochemistry, control, and evolution of genes responsible for MIA biosynthesis. However, generation of a near-complete, scaffolded genome is prohibitive to small research communities due to the expense, time, and expertise required. In this study, we generated a genome assembly for C. roseus which provides a near comprehensive representation of the genic space that revealed the genomic context of key points within the MIA biosynthetic pathway including physically clustered genes, tandem gene duplication, expression subfunctionalization, and putative neofunctionalization. The genome sequence also facilitated high resolution coexpression analyses that revealed three distinct clusters of co-expression within the components of the MIA pathway. Coordinated biosynthesis of precursors and intermediates throughout the pathway appear to be a feature of vinblastine/vincristine biosynthesis. The C. roseus genome also revealed localization of enzyme-rich genic regions and transporters near known biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting how even a draft genome sequence can empower the study of high-value specialized metabolites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

 
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Transcriptome Sequence Analysis of an Ornamental Plant, Ananas comosus var. bracteatus , Revealed the Potential Unigenes Involved in Terpenoid and Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis

Transcriptome Sequence Analysis of an Ornamental Plant,  Ananas comosus  var.  bracteatus , Revealed the Potential Unigenes Involved in Terpenoid and Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Background Ananas comosus var. bracteatus (Red Pineapple) is an important ornamental plant for its colorful leaves and decorative red fruits. Because of its complex genome, it is difficult to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and development. Thus high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of Ananas comosus var. bracteatus is necessary to generate large quantities of transcript sequences for the purpose of gene discovery and functional genomic studies. R
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:
AbstractBackground

Ananas comosus var. bracteatus (Red Pineapple) is an important ornamental plant for its colorful leaves and decorative red fruits. Because of its complex genome, it is difficult to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and development. Thus high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of Ananas comosus var. bracteatus is necessary to generate large quantities of transcript sequences for the purpose of gene discovery and functional genomic studies.

Results

The Ananas comosus var. bracteatus transcriptome was sequenced by the Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. We obtained a total of 23.5 million high quality sequencing reads, 1,555,808 contigs and 41,052 unigenes. In total 41,052 unigenes of Ananas comosus var.bracteatus, 23,275 unigenes were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 23,134 unigenes were annotated in the Swiss-Port database. Out of these, 17,748 and 8,505 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology categories and clusters of orthologous groups, respectively. Functional annotation against Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database identified 5,825 unigenes which were mapped to 117 pathways. The assembly predicted many unigenes that were previously unknown. The annotated unigenes were compared against pineapple, rice, maize, Arabidopsis, and sorghum. Unigenes that did not match any of those five sequence datasets are considered to be Ananas comosus var.bracteatus unique. We predicted unigenes encoding enzymes involved in terpenoid and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis.

Conclusion

The sequence data provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource currently available for Ananas comosus var. bracteatus. To our knowledge; this is the first report on the de novo transcriptome sequencing of the Ananas comosus var. bracteatus. Unigenes obtained in this study, may help improve future gene expression, genetic and genomics studies in Ananas comosus var. bracteatus.

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The Draft Genome of Hop (Humulus lupulus), an Essence for Brewing

The Draft Genome of Hop (Humulus lupulus), an Essence for Brewing | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
The female flower of hop (Humulus lupulus var. lupulus) is an essential ingredient that gives characteristic aroma, bitterness and durability/stability to beer. However, the molecular genetic basis for identifying DNA markers in hop for breeding and to study its domestication has been poorly established. Here, we provide draft genomes for two hop cultivars [cv. Saazer (SZ) and cv. Shinshu Wase (SW)] and a Japanese wild hop [H. lupulus var. cordifolius; also known as Karahanasou (KR)]. Sequencing and de novo assembly of genomic DNA from heterozygous SW plants generated scaffolds with a total size of 2.05 Gb, corresponding to approximately 80% of the estimated genome size of hop (2.57 Gb). The scaffolds contained 41,228 putative protein-encoding genes. The genome sequences for SZ and KR were constructed by aligning their short sequence reads to the SW reference genome and then replacing the nucleotides at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. De novo RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of SW revealed the developmental regulation of genes involved in specialized metabolic processes that impact taste and flavor in beer. Application of a novel bioinformatics tool, phylogenetic comparative RNA-Seq (PCP-Seq), which is based on read depth of genomic DNAs and RNAs, enabled the identification of genes related to the biosynthesis of aromas and flavors that are enriched in SW compared to KR. Our results not only suggest the significance of historical human selection process for enhancing aroma and bitterness biosyntheses in hop cultivars, but also serve as crucial information for breeding varieties with high quality and yield.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

The female flower of hop (Humulus lupulus var. lupulus) is an essential ingredient that gives characteristic aroma, bitterness and durability/stability to beer. However, the molecular genetic basis for identifying DNA markers in hop for breeding and to study its domestication has been poorly established. Here, we provide draft genomes for two hop cultivars [cv. Saazer (SZ) and cv. Shinshu Wase (SW)] and a Japanese wild hop [H. lupulus var. cordifolius; also known as Karahanasou (KR)]. Sequencing and de novo assembly of genomic DNA from heterozygous SW plants generated scaffolds with a total size of 2.05 Gb, corresponding to approximately 80% of the estimated genome size of hop (2.57 Gb). The scaffolds contained 41,228 putative protein-encoding genes. The genome sequences for SZ and KR were constructed by aligning their short sequence reads to the SW reference genome and then replacing the nucleotides at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. De novoRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of SW revealed the developmental regulation of genes involved in specialized metabolic processes that impact taste and flavor in beer. Application of a novel bioinformatics tool,phylogenetic comparative RNA-Seq (PCP-Seq), which is based on read depth of genomic DNAs and RNAs, enabled the identification of genes related to the biosynthesis of aromas and flavors that are enriched in SW compared to KR. Our results not only suggest the significance of historical human selection process for enhancing aroma and bitterness biosyntheses in hop cultivars, but also serve as crucial information for breeding varieties with high quality and yield.

 

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Omics Pipe: A Community-based Framework for Reproducible Multi-Omics Data Analysis

Omics Pipe: A Community-based Framework for Reproducible Multi-Omics Data Analysis | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
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Abstract

Motivation: Omics Pipe (http://sulab.scripps.edu/omicspipe) is a computational framework that automates multi-omics data analysis pipelines on high performance compute clusters and in the cloud. It supports best practice published pipelines for RNA-seq, miRNA-seq, Exome-seq, Whole Genome sequencing, ChIP-seq analyses and automatic processing of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Omics Pipe provides researchers with a tool for reproducible, open source and extensible next generation sequencing analysis. The goal of Omics Pipe is to democratize NGS analysis by dramatically increasing the accessibility and reproducibility of best practice computational pipelines, which will enable researchers to generate biologically meaningful and interpretable results.

Results: Using Omics Pipe, we analyzed 100 TCGA breast invasive carcinoma paired tumor-normal data sets based on the latest UCSC hg19 RefSeq annotation. Omics Pipe automatically downloaded and processed the desired TCGA samples on a high throughput compute cluster to produce a results report for each sample. We aggregated the individual sample results and compared them to the analysis in the original publications. This comparison revealed high overlap between the analyses, as well as novel findings due to the use of updated annotations and methods.

Availability and Implementation: Source code for Omics Pipe is freely available on the web (https://bitbucket.org/sulab/omics_pipe). Omics Pipe is distributed as a standalone Python package for installation (https://pypi.python.org/pypi/omics_pipe) and as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) in Amazon Web Services (AWS) Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) that contains all necessary third-party software dependencies and databases (https://pythonhosted.org/omics_pipe/AWS_installation.html).

Contact: asu@scripps.edu or kfisch@ucsd.edu

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Reactive short-chain leaf volatiles act as powerful inducers of abiotic stress-related gene expression

Reactive short-chain leaf volatiles act as powerful inducers of abiotic stress-related gene expression | Plant Genomics | Scoop.it
Abiotic stresses cause serious damage to plants; therefore, plants undergo a complicated stress response through signal transduction originating from environmental stimuli. Here we show that a subset of short-chain leaf volatiles with an [agr], [bgr]-unsaturated carbonyl bond in their structure (reactive short-chain leaf volatiles, RSLVs) like (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-butenal can act as signal chemicals that strongly induce the gene expression of abiotic-related transcription factors, such as heat stress-related transcription factors (HSFA2, MBF1c) and other abiotic stress-related transcription factors (DREB2A, ZATs). RSLV-induced expression of HSFA2 and MBF1c was eliminated in HSFA1s-, known as heat stress response master regulators, knockout mutant, whereas those of DREB2A and ZATs were not, suggesting that the RSLV signaling pathway is composed of HSFA1-dependent and -independent pathways. RSLV treatment induced production of chaperon proteins, and the RSLV-treated Arabidopsis thus demonstrated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance. Because oxidative stress treatment enhanced RSLV production, we concluded that commonly found RSLVs produced by environmental stresses are powerful inducer of abiotic stress-related gene expression as oxidative stress signals.
Biswapriya Biswavas Misra's insight:

Abiotic stresses cause serious damage to plants; therefore, plants undergo a complicated stress response through signal transduction originating from environmental stimuli. Here we show that a subset of short-chain leaf volatiles with an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl bond in their structure (reactive short-chain leaf volatiles, RSLVs) like (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-butenal can act as signal chemicals that strongly induce the gene expression of abiotic-related transcription factors, such as heat stress-related transcription factors (HSFA2,MBF1c) and other abiotic stress-related transcription factors (DREB2A, ZATs). RSLV-induced expression of HSFA2 and MBF1c was eliminated in HSFA1s-, known as heat stress response master regulators, knockout mutant, whereas those of DREB2A and ZATs were not, suggesting that the RSLV signaling pathway is composed of HSFA1-dependent and -independent pathways. RSLV treatment induced production of chaperon proteins, and the RSLV-treated Arabidopsis thus demonstrated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance. Because oxidative stress treatment enhanced RSLV production, we concluded that commonly found RSLVs produced by environmental stresses are powerful inducer of abiotic stress-related gene expression as oxidative stress signals.

  
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