Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
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Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
Absolutely Fascinated for plant & genomes
Curated by Andres Zurita
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A Glorious Half-Century of Microtubules - The Plant Journal

A Glorious Half-Century of Microtubules -  The Plant Journal | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Special Issue: A Glorious Half-Century of Microtubules.

Several Open Access reviews and commemorates the discovery of Microtubules.

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LcSAIN1, a Novel Salt-Induced Gene from SheepGrass, Confers Salt Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice

LcSAIN1, a Novel Salt-Induced Gene from SheepGrass, Confers Salt Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
Andres Zurita's insight:

Previously, we identified >1,500 genes that were induced by high salt stress in sheepgrass (Leymus chinensis, Gramineae: Triticeae) when comparing the changes in their transcription levels in response to high salt stress by next-generation sequencing. Among the identified genes, a gene of unknown function (designated as Leymus chinensis salt-induced 1,LcSAIN1) showed a high sequence identity to its homologs from wheat,Hordeum vulgare and Oryza sativa, but LcSAIN1 and its homologs produce hypothetical proteins with no conserved functional domains. Transcription of the LcSAIN1 gene was up-regulated by various stresses. The overexpression of LcSAIN1 in Arabidopsis and rice increased the greening rate of cotyledons, the fresh weight, root elongation, plant height and the plant survival rate when compared with control plants and conferred a tolerance against salt stress. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that LcSAIN1 is localized predominantly in the nucleus. Our results show that the LcSAIN1 gene might play an important positive modulation role in increasing the expression of transcription factors (MYB2 and DREB2A) and functional genes (P5CS and RAB18) in transgenic plants under salt stress and that it augments stress tolerance through the accumulation of compatible solutes (proline and soluble sugar) and the alleviation of changes in reactive oxygen species. The LcSAIN1 gene could be a potential resource for engineering salinity tolerance in important crop species.

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Arabidopsis Enhanced Drought Tolerance1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice without Yield Penalty

Arabidopsis Enhanced Drought Tolerance1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice without Yield Penalty | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Enhancing drought tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. Here, we report the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor Enhanced Drought Tolerance/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (EDT1/HDG11) was able to confer drought tolerance and increase grain yield in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The improved drought tolerance was associated with a more extensive root system, reduced stomatal density, and higher water use efficiency. The transgenic rice plants also had higher levels of abscisic acid, proline, soluble sugar, and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activities during stress treatments. The increased grain yield of the transgenic rice was contributed by improved seed setting, larger panicle, and more tillers as well as increased photosynthetic capacity. Digital gene expression analysis indicated that AtEDT1/HDG11 had a significant influence on gene expression profile in rice, which was consistent with the observed phenotypes of transgenic rice plants. Our study shows thatAtEDT1/HDG11 can improve both stress tolerance and grain yield in rice, demonstrating the efficacy of AtEDT1/HDG11 in crop improvement.



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Annals of Botany, SPECIAL ISSUE: Matching Roots to Environment

Annals of Botany, SPECIAL ISSUE: Matching Roots to Environment | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Matching roots to their environment 

Plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature, and their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. White et al. (pp. 207–222) examine how the roots of land plants evolved, describe how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres affects the utilization of soil resources, and discuss the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. They then describe the roles of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrate root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of soil resources, and discuss high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, they consider how adaptations to root systems might enable sustainable agriculture in the future.

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Comparative transcriptomics reveals patterns of selection in domesticated and wild tomato

Andres Zurita's insight:
Significance

One of the most important technological advances by humans is the domestication of plant species for the production of food. We have used high-throughput sequencing to identify changes in DNA sequence and gene expression that differentiate cultivated tomato and its wild relatives. We also identify hundreds of candidate genes that have evolved new protein sequences or have changed expression levels in response to natural selection in wild tomato relatives. Taken together, our analyses provide a snapshot of genome evolution under artificial and natural conditions.

Abstract

Although applied over extremely short timescales, artificial selection has dramatically altered the form, physiology, and life history of cultivated plants. We have used RNAseq to define both gene sequence and expression divergence between cultivated tomato and five related wild species. Based on sequence differences, we detect footprints of positive selection in over 50 genes. We also document thousands of shifts in gene-expression level, many of which resulted from changes in selection pressure. These rapidly evolving genes are commonly associated with environmental response and stress tolerance. The importance of environmental inputs during evolution of gene expression is further highlighted by large-scale alteration of the light response coexpression network between wild and cultivated accessions. Human manipulation of the genome has heavily impacted the tomato transcriptome through directed admixture and by indirectly favoring nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions. Taken together, our results shed light on the pervasive effects artificial and natural selection have had on the transcriptomes of tomato and its wild relatives.

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Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease?

Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease? | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Plants respond to pathogens using elaborate networks of genetic interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense. In addition, plants also induce hypersensitive and systemic acquired resistance responses, which together limit the virus to infected cells and impart resistance to the noninfected tissues. Molecular processes such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA methylation are also critical to antiviral defenses. Here, we provide a summary and update of advances in plant antiviral immune responses, beyond RNA silencing mechanisms—advances that went relatively unnoticed in the realm of RNA silencing and nonviral immune responses. We also document the rise of Brachypodium and Setaria species as model grasses to study antiviral responses in Poaceae, aspects that have been relatively understudied, despite grasses being the primary source of our calories, as well as animal feed, forage, recreation, and biofuel needs in the 21st century. Finally, we outline critical gaps, future prospects, and considerations central to studying plant antiviral immunity. To promote an integrated model of plant immunity, we discuss analogous viral and nonviral immune concepts and propose working definitions of viral effectors, effector-triggered immunity, and viral pathogen-triggered immunity.


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PLOS Biology: Where Have All the Crop Phenotypes Gone?

PLOS Biology: Where Have All the Crop Phenotypes Gone? | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
PLOS Biology is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal that features works of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems, including works at the interface with other disciplines.
Andres Zurita's insight:

In crop genetics and breeding research, phenotypic data are collected for each plant genotype, often in multiple locations and field conditions, in search of the genomic regions that confer improved traits. But what is happening to all of these phenotypic data? Currently, virtually none of the data generated from the hundreds of phenotypic studies conducted each year are being made publically available as raw data; thus there is little we can learn from past experience when making decisions about how to breed better crops for the future. This ongoing loss of phenotypic information, particularly about crop productivity, must be stopped if we are to meet the considerable challenge of increasing food production sufficiently to meet the needs of a growing world population. Here I present a road map for developing and implementing an information network to share data on crop plant phenotypes.

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From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources

From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

It was super to hear Luis Herrera-Estrella share this exciting work at the ICAR meeting. Luis has been investigating the problem of phosphate limitation for much of his career - see more here: (http://www.hhmi.org/research/sirs/herrera_estrella.html).

 

The work, recently published in Nature Biotechnology (http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v30/n9/full/nbt.2346.html) explores the use of phosphite, a reduced version of phospate, as a dual purpose fertilizer and weed killer. His work suggests that by using phosphite, the limited global reserves could serve our needs for twice as long as if we continue to use it as phosphate.

 

One of the interesting things I learned from his talk is about the source of the enzyme phosphite oxidoreductase. It was found in Bacillus coahuilensis, which lives in a very nutrient-poor environment, Cuatro Ciénegas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuatro_Ci%C3%A9negas). This unique environment is one of only a few places you can find living stromatolites (colonies of cyanobacteia) - Shark Bay, Western Australia is the other well-known place to see them.


Via Mary Williams, Jennifer Mach
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Jorge Sáenz Mata's curator insight, June 27, 2013 2:34 PM

Interesting!! Investigadores Mexicanos!!

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Plant breeding as a public good. Again.

Back in February 2012 we were happy to spread the word about the first Student Organic Seed Symposium, in Vermont in the US. We heard no more about it, of course.

Via Luigi Guarino
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Anthocyanins Double the Shelf Life of Tomatoes by Delaying Overripening and Reducing Susceptibility to Gray Mold | Current Biology

Anthocyanins Double the Shelf Life of Tomatoes by Delaying Overripening and Reducing Susceptibility to Gray Mold | Current Biology | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
Andres Zurita's insight:
HighlightsAnthocyanin accumulation doubles the postharvest storage time of tomato fruitAnthocyanin enrichment reduces susceptibility of tomato fruit to Botrytis cinereaLonger shelf life is associated with high hydrophilic antioxidant capacity of fruitAnthocyanins perturb the dynamics of the ROS burst during infection by B. cinereaSummary

Shelf life is an important quality trait for many fruit, including tomatoes. We report that enrichment of anthocyanin, a natural pigment, in tomatoes can significantly extend shelf life. Processes late in ripening are suppressed by anthocyanin accumulation, and susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, one of the most important postharvest pathogens, is reduced in purple tomato fruit. We show that reduced susceptibility to B. cinerea is dependent specifically on the accumulation of anthocyanins, which alter the spreading of the ROS burst during infection. The increased antioxidant capacity of purple fruit likely slows the processes of overripening. Enhancing the levels of natural antioxidants in tomato provides a novel strategy for extending shelf life by genetic engineering or conventional breeding.

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Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health.

 


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
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Trends in Plant Science - A trait-based framework to understand life history of mycorrhizal fungi

Trends in Plant Science - A trait-based framework to understand life history of mycorrhizal fungi | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

Despite the growing appreciation for the functional diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, our understanding of the causes and consequences of this diversity is still poor. In this opinion article, we review published data on AM fungal functional traits and attempt to identify major axes of life history variation. We propose that a life history classification system based on the grouping of functional traits, such as Grime's C-S-R (competitor, stress tolerator, ruderal) framework, can help to explain life history diversification in AM fungi, successional dynamics, and the spatial structure of AM fungal assemblages. Using a common life history classification framework for both plants and AM fungi could also help in predicting probable species associations in natural communities and increase our fundamental understanding of the interaction between land plants and AM fungi.


Via Jennifer Mach
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Temperature, light and nitrate sensing coordinate Arabidopsis seed dormancy cycling, resulting in winter and summer annual phenotypes - Plant Journal

Temperature, light and nitrate sensing coordinate Arabidopsis seed dormancy cycling, resulting in winter and summer annual phenotypes - Plant Journal | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Summary

Seeds use environmental cues to sense the seasons and their surroundings to initiate the life cycle of the plant. The dormancy cycling underlying this process is extensively described, but the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. To address this we selected a range of representative genes from published array experiments in the laboratory, and investigated their expression patterns in seeds of Arabidopsis ecotypes with contrasting life cycles over an annual dormancy cycle in the field. We show how mechanisms identified in the laboratory are coordinated in response to the soil environment to determine the dormancy cycles that result in winter and summer annual phenotypes. Our results are consistent with a seed-specific response to seasonal temperature patterns (temporal sensing) involving the gene DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) that indicates the correct season, and concurrent temporally driven co-opted mechanisms that sense spatial signals, i.e. nitrate, via CBL-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE 23 (CIPK23) phosphorylation of the NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1 (NRT1.1), and light, via PHYTOCHROME A (PHYA). In both ecotypes studied, when all three genes have low expression there is enhanced GIBBERELLIN 3 BETA-HYDROXYLASE 1 (GA3ox1) expression, exhumed seeds have the potential to germinate in the laboratory, and the initiation of seedling emergence occurs following soil disturbance (exposure to light) in the field. Unlike DOG1, the expression of MOTHER of FLOWERING TIME (MFT) has an opposite thermal response in seeds of the two ecotypes, indicating a role in determining their different dormancy cycling phenotypes.

 

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PLOS ONE: Plant Water Use Efficiency over Geological Time – Evolution of Leaf Stomata Configurations Affecting Plant Gas Exchange

PLOS ONE: Plant Water Use Efficiency over Geological Time – Evolution of Leaf Stomata Configurations Affecting Plant Gas Exchange | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
Andres Zurita's insight:

Plant gas exchange is a key process shaping global hydrological and carbon cycles and is often characterized by plant water use efficiency (WUE - the ratio of CO2 gain to water vapor loss). Plant fossil record suggests that plant adaptation to changing atmospheric CO2 involved correlated evolution of stomata density (d) and size (s), and related maximal aperture, amax. We interpreted the fossil record of s and d correlated evolution during the Phanerozoic to quantify impacts on gas conductance affecting plant transpiration, E, and CO2 uptake, A,independently, and consequently, on plant WUE. A shift in stomata configuration from large s-low d to small s-high d in response to decreasing atmospheric CO2 resulted in large changes in plant gas exchange characteristics. The relationships between gas conductance, gws, A and Eand maximal relative transpiring leaf area, (amax⋅d), exhibited hysteretic-like behavior. The new WUE trend derived from independent estimates of A and E differs from established WUE-CO2trends for atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeding 1,200 ppm. In contrast with a nearly-linear decrease in WUE with decreasing CO2 obtained by standard methods, the newly estimated WUE trend exhibits remarkably stable values for an extended geologic period during which atmospheric CO2 dropped from 3,500 to 1,200 ppm. Pending additional tests, the findings may affect projected impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 on components of the global hydrological cycle.

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Thermotolerance Responses in Ripening Berries of Vitis vinifera L. cv Muscat Hamburg

Thermotolerance Responses in Ripening Berries of Vitis vinifera L. cv Muscat Hamburg | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
Andres Zurita's insight:

Berry organoleptic properties are highly influenced by ripening environmental conditions. In this study, we used grapevine fruiting cuttings to follow berry ripening under different controlled conditions of temperature and irradiation intensity. Berries ripened at higher temperatures showed reduced anthocyanin accumulation and hastened ripening, leading to a characteristic drop in malic acid and total acidity. The GrapeGen GeneChip® combined with a newly developed GrapeGen 12Xv1 MapMan version were utilized for the functional analysis of berry transcriptomic differences after 2 week treatments from veraison onset. These analyses revealed the establishment of a thermotolerance response in berries under high temperatures marked by the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) chaperones and the repression of transmembrane transporter-encoding transcripts. The thermotolerance response was coincident with up-regulation of ERF subfamily transcription factors and increased ABA levels, suggesting their participation in the maintenance of the acclimation response. Lower expression of amino acid transporter-encoding transcripts at high temperature correlated with balanced amino acid content, suggesting a transcriptional compensation of temperature effects on protein and membrane stability to allow for completion of berry ripening. In contrast, the lower accumulation of anthocyanins and higher malate metabolization measured under high temperature might partly result from imbalance in the expression and function of their specific transmembrane transporters and expression changes in genes involved in their metabolic pathways. These results open up new views to improve our understanding of berry ripening under high temperatures.

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Potassium Ion Channels: Could They Have Evolved from Viruses?

Potassium Ion Channels: Could They Have Evolved from Viruses? | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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Cells communicate among themselves by electrical activity. Sophisticated membrane-embedded proteins, called ion channels, catalyze rapid, selective, and regulated ion fluxes across membranes (Hille, 2001). The resulting membrane currents are responsible for neuronal activity and the systemic propagation of electrical signals in animals. The activity of some channels is important for muscle movement in animals or growth in plants; other channels sense the concentration of physiological signals and modulate key processes in all kinds of eukaryotic cells. Among the many diverse ion channels in higher organisms, K+channels are among the most important. One feature of K+ channels is that they conduct K+ ions much better than slightly smaller Na+ ions (Hille, 2001). The selective transport of K+ is involved in many physiological functions, including homeostasis of the membrane potential and the repolarization of the action potential in excitable cells. Because of a universal requirement for selective K+fluxes across membranes, K+ channels are present in plasma membranes of all cell types in animals and plants. K+ channels also exist in organellar membranes, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, and endoplasmic reticula.


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An atlas of over 90,000 conserved noncoding sequences provides insight into crucifer regulatory regions : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group

An atlas of over 90,000 conserved noncoding sequences provides insight into crucifer regulatory regions : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
Mathieu Blanchette and colleagues report whole-genome sequencing of three Brassicaceae species, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and Aethionema arabicum.
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Abstract

Despite the central importance of noncoding DNA to gene regulation and evolution, understanding of the extent of selection on plant noncoding DNA remains limited compared to that of other organisms. Here we report sequencing of genomes from three Brassicaceae species (Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and Aethionema arabicum) and their joint analysis with six previously sequenced crucifer genomes. Conservation across orthologous bases suggests that at least 17% of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome is under selection, with nearly one-quarter of the sequence under selection lying outside of coding regions. Much of this sequence can be localized to approximately 90,000 conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) that show evidence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Population genomics analyses of two crucifer species, A. thaliana and Capsella grandiflora, confirm that most of the identified CNSs are evolving under medium to strong purifying selection. Overall, these CNSs highlight both similarities and several key differences between the regulatory DNA of plants and other species

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PLOS ONE: Trends in Ocean Colour and Chlorophyll Concentration from 1889 to 2000, Worldwide

PLOS ONE: Trends in Ocean Colour and Chlorophyll Concentration from 1889 to 2000, Worldwide | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
Andres Zurita's insight:

Marine primary productivity is an important agent in the global cycling of carbon dioxide, a major ‘greenhouse gas’, and variations in the concentration of the ocean's phytoplankton biomass can therefore explain trends in the global carbon budget. Since the launch of satellite-mounted sensors globe-wide monitoring of chlorophyll, a phytoplankton biomass proxy, became feasible. Just as satellites, the Forel-Ule (FU) scale record (a hardly explored database of ocean colour) has covered all seas and oceans – but already since 1889. We provide evidence that changes of ocean surface chlorophyll can be reconstructed with confidence from this record. The EcoLight radiative transfer numerical model indicates that theFU index is closely related to chlorophyll concentrations in open ocean regions. The most complete FU record is that of the North Atlantic in terms of coverage over space and in time; this dataset has been used to test the validity of colour changes that can be translated to chlorophyll. The FU and FU-derived chlorophyll data were analysed for monotonously increasing or decreasing trends with the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test, a method to establish the presence of a consistent trend. Our analysis has not revealed a globe-wide trend of increase or decrease in chlorophyll concentration during the past century; ocean regions have apparently responded differentially to changes in meteorological, hydrological and biological conditions at the surface, including potential long-term trends related to global warming. Since 1889, chlorophyll concentrations have decreased in the Indian Ocean and in the Pacific; increased in the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean, the Chinese Sea, and in the seas west and north-west of Japan. This suggests that explanations of chlorophyll changes over long periods should focus on hydrographical and biological characteristics typical of single ocean regions, not on those of ‘the’ ocean.

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Genomic analysis solves the turtle mystery - Research Highlights - RIKEN RESEARCH

Genomic analysis solves the turtle mystery - Research Highlights - RIKEN RESEARCH | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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One of the greatest evolutionary puzzles succumbs to molecular genetics

 

The turtle has always been considered somewhat odd in evolutionary terms. In addition to lacking the hole in the skull—the temporal fenestra—that is characteristic of the egg-laying amniotes, the structure of its shell differs from that of other armored tetrapods such as the armadillo, and its shoulder blades are inside rather than outside the rib cage. An international research team led by Naoki Irie of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology has now shown through genomic analysis that turtles are most closely related to crocodiles and birds, and that their embryonic development follows the latest ‘hourglass’ model of vertebrate embryology1.

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ABCC1, an ATP Binding Cassette Protein from Grape Berry, Transports Anthocyanidin 3-O-Glucosides

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Accumulation of anthocyanins in the exocarp of red grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars is one of several events that characterize the onset of grape berry ripening (véraison). Despite our thorough understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, little is known about the molecular aspects of their transport. The participation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins in vacuolar anthocyanin transport has long been a matter of debate. Here, we present biochemical evidence that an ABC protein, ABCC1, localizes to the tonoplast and is involved in the transport of glucosylated anthocyanidins. ABCC1 is expressed in the exocarp throughout berry development and ripening, with a significant increase at véraison (i.e., the onset of ripening). Transport experiments using microsomes isolated from ABCC1-expressing yeast cells showed that ABCC1 transports malvidin 3-O-glucoside. The transport strictly depends on the presence of GSH, which is cotransported with the anthocyanins and is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC proteins. By exposing anthocyanin-producing grapevine root cultures to buthionine sulphoximine, which reduced GSH levels, a decrease in anthocyanin concentration is observed. In conclusion, we provide evidence that ABCC1 acts as an anthocyanin transporter that depends on GSH without the formation of an anthocyanin-GSH conjugate.


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Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from avocado seed (Persea americana var. drymifolia) reveals abundant expression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide snakin

Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from avocado seed (Persea americana var. drymifolia) reveals abundant expression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide snakin | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
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PLOS ONE: Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050

PLOS ONE: Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050 | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

"Clearly, the world faces a looming and growing agricultural crisis. Yields are not improving fast enough to keep up with projected demands in 2050. However, opportunities do exist to increase production through more efficient use of current arable lands and increasing yield growth rates by spreading best management practices and closing yield gaps under different management regimes across the globe."


Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:05 AM

Data! This is great, put it in your course folders for your students.

Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, June 22, 2013 8:43 PM

Reality check... a bit scary.

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Meet Calestous Juma, Africa’s genetically modified crop ‘optimist’

Meet Calestous Juma, Africa’s genetically modified crop ‘optimist’ | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it
‘Technological intolerance’ has hampered adoption of GMOs, particularly in Africa, says Harvard professor Calestous Juma.

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Beyond the Human Eye: Plant Cuticles

Beyond the Human Eye: Plant Cuticles | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

Via Anne Osterrieder
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Great images!

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Anne Osterrieder's curator insight, June 7, 2013 8:44 PM

Lovely micrographs of plant cuticles, by Phil Gates. 

Hiren P Bhatt's comment, July 17, 2013 4:47 AM
nice article
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Curr.Opin.Plant Biol. Biomechanics of plant–insect interactions

Curr.Opin.Plant Biol.  Biomechanics of plant–insect interactions | Plant Gene Seeker -PGS | Scoop.it

"Plant–insect interactions are determined by both chemical and physical mechanisms. Biomechanical factors play an important role across many ecological situations, including pollination, herbivory and plant carnivory, and have led to complex adaptations in both plants and insects."


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Mary Williams's curator insight, June 13, 2013 5:30 AM

Nice review that covers everything from petal texture to carnivorous plant trapping mechanisms. It might appeal to some of your less chemically-included students.