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Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
Curated by Mary Williams
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Plant-Plant Interactions, the newest Teaching Tool online

Plant-Plant Interactions, the newest Teaching Tool online | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Online today, the newest Teaching Tool in Plant Biology, "Plant-Plant Interactions", by Ariel Novoplansky and Mary Williams. It's all about how plants sense and respond to their neighbors. Subscription to Plant Cell required. Slides, lecture notes and teaching guide too!
http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/TTPB25.xhtml

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Mahani Mohamad's curator insight, June 2, 2013 12:35 PM

to be shared with Jr.

Happy Updates's comment, June 3, 2013 12:55 AM
nice share Mary Williams http://icareeradvice.com/
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Science x2: Back-to-back papers on miRNAs role in age-dependent vernalization response

Science x2: Back-to-back papers on miRNAs role in age-dependent vernalization response | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Mechanisms of Age-Dependent Response to Winter Temperature in Perennial Flowering of Arabis alpina

Sara Bergonzi et al and George Coupland

Science 31 May 2013: 1094-1097.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6136/1094

 

And

Molecular Basis of Age-Dependent Vernalization in Cardamine flexuosa

Chuan-Miao Zhou,et al and Jia-Wei Wang

Science 31 May 2013: 1097-1100.

www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6136/1097

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The good earth: Coonawarra Red Dermosol and Cabernet Sauvignon

The good earth: Coonawarra Red Dermosol and Cabernet Sauvignon | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Australia has some of the world’s most ancient soils, many of which grow delicious produce

The biosynthesis of flavour chemicals by the vine is driven by genetic and environmental factors. The stresses and luxuries a plant encounters will influence the relative abundance of these chemicals, sometimes resulting in pleasurable combinations..."

Happy Friday!

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The Conversation Explainer: What is epigenetics?

The word epigenetics means things imposed “on top of genetics”. But what sort of things?Imagine a white mouse breeds with a black mouse – say you get three white babies and three black babies.

 

This is an interesting overview of what is and isn't epigenetics, and why epigenetics is only part of any story.

Mary Williams's insight:

Be sure to check out the cited article by Mark Ptashne too.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/04/11/1305399110

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Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease?

Plant Cell: Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

New review article in Plant Cell.

"Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense. In addition, plants also induce hypersensitive and systemic acquired resistance responses, which together limit the virus to infected cells and impart resistance to the noninfected tissues."

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Andres Zurita's curator insight, May 29, 2013 8:28 AM

Open Access pdf

María Serrano's curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:30 PM
Respuesta inmune de las plantas frente a los virus.
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Scientists Prove Green Algae's Appetite for Bacteria

"A team of researchers is the first to provide definitive proof that green algae eat bacteria. The finding, captured with electron microscope images, offers a glipse at how scienstists think early organisms acquired free-living chloroplasts"

Here's the article in Current Biology http://www.cell.com/current-biology/retrieve/pii/S0960982213005046

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Coevolution of farming and private property during the early Holocene

The advent of farming around 12 millennia ago was a cultural as well as technological revolution, requiring a new system of property rights. Among mobile hunter–gatherers during the late Pleistocene, food was almost certainly widely shared as it was acquired. If a harvested crop or the meat of a domesticated animal were to have been distributed to other group members, a late Pleistocene would-be farmer would have had little incentive to engage in the required investments in clearing, cultivation, animal tending, and storage. However, the new property rights that farming required—secure individual claims to the products of one’s labor—were infeasible because most of the mobile and dispersed resources of a forager economy could not cost-effectively be delimited and defended. The resulting chicken-and-egg puzzle might be resolved if farming had been much more productive than foraging, but initially it was not. Our model and simulations explain how, despite being an unlikely event, farming and a new system of farming-friendly property rights nonetheless jointly emerged when they did. This Holocene revolution was not sparked by a superior technology. It occurred because possession of the wealth of farmers—crops, dwellings, and animals—could be unambiguously demarcated and defended. This facilitated the spread of new property rights that were advantageous to the groups adopting them. Our results thus challenge unicausal models of historical dynamics driven by advances in technology, population pressure, or other exogenous changes. Our approach may be applied to other technological and institutional revolutions such as the 18th- and 19th-century industrial revolution and the information revolution today.


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
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PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology

PLOS Pathogens: Plant Virus Ecology | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
From molecules to physiology
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Raul Zavaliev's comment, May 31, 2013 4:01 AM
curious!..
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OA book: Abiotic Stress - Plant Responses and Applications in Agriculture

OA book: Abiotic Stress - Plant Responses and Applications in Agriculture | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

This recently published Open Access book includes up-to-date, well-written chapters on many aspects of plant responses to abiotic stress. Good resource for students and researchers!

 

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Plant Phys: Redox modulation of TCP transcription factors

Plant Phys: Redox modulation of TCP transcription factors | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF) transcription factors participate in plant developmental processes associated with cell proliferation and growth. Most members of class I, one of the two classes that compose the family, have a conserved Cys at position 20 of the TCP DNA binding and dimerization domain. We show that Arabidopsis thaliana class I proteins with Cys20 are sensitive to redox conditions.."

 

"There are several examples of transcription factors whose activity is modified by redox agents in plants. The best studied case is perhaps the NPR1-TGA system (Després et al., 2003; Mou et al., 2003; Lindermayr et al., 2010)."

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Hopeful monsters

Hopeful monsters | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
“Monsters are tragic beings. They are born too tall, too strong, too heavy. They are not evil by choice. That is their tragedy." Ishirō Honda (1911-1993)

Sometimes monstrous things lurk at our feet.

Via Meristemi
Mary Williams's insight:

Nice essay, including thoughts on fasciation, clavata, and the value of basic science :)

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Video (2min) Moving Forward from Ash Dieback

"Ash dieback disease recently arrived into Scotland and now threatens over 10 million ash trees. This beautiful short animation shows what we can all do to keep our trees healthy"

Mary Williams's insight:

Beautiful animation!

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Ninnu Korpi's curator insight, May 20, 2013 2:37 AM

Suloinen video :)

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Nature: "Driving students into science is a fool’s errand"

Nature: "Driving students into science is a fool’s errand" | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
If programmes to bolster STEM education are effective, they distort the labour market; if they aren’t, they’re a waste of money, argues Colin Macilwain.
Mary Williams's insight:

Ooh - that woke me up. Fantastic set of comments already appearing "below the line" - it's good to see the many reasons that justify the special funding science education gets. To me, science ed is training in critical, rational thinking, something society needs more of!

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Applied Mythology: Should the World Keep Feeding Europe?

Applied Mythology: Should the World Keep Feeding Europe? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Here's a thought-provoking blog post, certainly worth throwing into the classroom mix.

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Tania Gammage's curator insight, June 2, 2013 7:45 PM

Useful for Cross Curriculum Sustainablity.....Science ..Geography

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Science: Direct Imaging of Covalent Bond Structure in Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions

Science: Direct Imaging of Covalent Bond Structure in Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Mary Williams's insight:

Wow wow wow.

 

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Frontiers (Review): Regulation of cell division and expansion by sugar and auxin signaling (OA)

Frontiers (Review): Regulation of cell division and expansion by sugar and auxin signaling (OA) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Here, based on recent progress of genetic analyses and gene expression profiling studies, we summarize the functional similarities, diversities, and their interactions of sugar and auxin signals in regulating two major processes of plant development: cell division and cell expansion."

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Plant Cell: D6PK Kinases Promote Phototropic Hypocotyl Bending in Arabidopsis

Plant Cell: D6PK Kinases Promote Phototropic Hypocotyl Bending in Arabidopsis | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"We previously described the D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) subfamily of AGCVIII kinases, which we proposed to directly regulate PIN-mediated auxin transport. Here, we show that phototropic hypocotyl bending is strongly dependent on the activity of D6PKs and the PIN proteins PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7."

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PNAS Special Feature: Agricultural innovation to protect the environment

PNAS Special Feature: Agricultural innovation to protect the environment | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

This might be useful - a set of articles about agricultural planning and practices.

 

This image, from the journal cover, courtesy of Agni Klintuni Boedhihartono.

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NPR Weekend All Things Considered: Scientists Trace Source Of Famed Irish Potato Famine (2013)

NPR Weekend All Things Considered: Scientists Trace Source Of Famed Irish Potato Famine (2013) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We now know what caused the Irish potato famine. Scientists have pinpointed the pathogen by using plant samples collected in the mid-19th century. Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden talks about it with the study's co-author, Sophien Kamoun of the Sainsbury Lab in the United Kingdom.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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zhouxia's curator insight, May 31, 2013 5:03 AM

npr

BLC3's curator insight, June 4, 2013 6:43 AM

Scientists can even help history out. 

Suggested by MOOC News & Reviews
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"I Can't Imagine Going Back": Inside A Duke Professor's Flipped Classroom - moocnewsandreviews.com

"I Can't Imagine Going Back": Inside A Duke Professor's Flipped Classroom - moocnewsandreviews.com | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Podcast and transcript of Biology Prof. Mohamed Noor of Duke University discussing his flipped classroom and his Coursera MOOC on Genetics and Evolution.
Mary Williams's insight:

This is worth a look if you're wondering how to engage students in a large class - it is possible!

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Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, May 27, 2013 9:18 AM

This article shares the experiences of a Duke University Professor who taught a MOOC class simultaneously with a flipped classroom version for his on campus students.  Gives insights  into his teaching strategies and the learning  outcomes he perceived in those two different groups of students.

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Ed Yong: A Guide for Scientists on Giving Comments to Journalists (good guidelines for student writing)

Ed Yong: A Guide for Scientists on Giving Comments to Journalists (good guidelines for student writing) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

When writing a story about a new publication, science journalists like to include an opinion from another scientist who was not involved in the work.  Here, Ed Yong gives some suggestions for how how to provide useful  comments.

I think this is a particularly good set of instructions to give to students when you ask them to write a reponse to a paper. Don't just summarize the paper, actually discuss its strengths and weaknesses, and provide context. Analyze and interpret, don't just restate - higher levels of learning / processing (a la Bloom).

 

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Plant Phys: Interplay between sucrose and folate modulates auxin signalling in Arabidopsis

Plant Phys: Interplay between sucrose and folate modulates auxin signalling in Arabidopsis | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Compounds from the library of active compounds in Arabidopsis (LATCA) were screened for the ability to perturb developmental responses to sucrose in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. This screen found that sulfonamides, which inhibit folate biosynthesis in plants, restrict hypocotyl elongation in a sugar-dependent fashion."

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eLife: The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine (2013)

eLife: The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine (2013) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Phytophthora infestans, the cause of potato late blight, is infamous for having triggered the Irish Great Famine in the 1840s. Until the late 1970s, P. infestans diversity outside of its Mexican center of origin was low, and one scenario held that a single strain, US-1, had dominated the global population for 150 years; this was later challenged based on DNA analysis of historical herbarium specimens. We have compared the genomes of 11 herbarium and 15 modern strains. We conclude that the nineteenth century epidemic was caused by a unique genotype, HERB-1, that persisted for over 50 years. HERB-1 is distinct from all examined modern strains, but it is a close relative of US-1, which replaced it outside of Mexico in the twentieth century. We propose that HERB-1 and US-1 emerged from a metapopulation that was established in the early 1800s outside of the species' center of diversity.

 

Preprint @ http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.4206


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Alejandro Rojas's curator insight, May 21, 2013 7:54 AM

I'm so excited to see a paper like this!, It is so great to have acces to papers like this through systems like ArXiv.  

Jennifer Mach's comment, May 21, 2013 9:34 AM
Nature News and Views article: http://www.nature.com/news/pathogen-genome-tracks-irish-potato-famine-back-to-its-roots-1.13021
Mary Williams's comment, May 21, 2013 11:45 AM
On the radio http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/50992192578/go-back-to-the-past-to-better-prepare-for-the
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NYTimes: High Plains Aquifer Dwindles, Hurting Farmers

NYTimes: High Plains Aquifer Dwindles, Hurting Farmers | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Parts of the vast High Plains Aquifer, once a prodigious source of water, are now so low that crops can’t be watered and bridges span arid stream beds.
Mary Williams's insight:

I'm starting to collect articles for the Teaching Tool on Plant Water Relations. I'm not sure that I can stand to read too many like this one. It's very depressing to wonder how food will be grown 50 years from now, when the water's all gone.

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BLC3's curator insight, June 4, 2013 6:45 AM

What will happen in 50 years time when all the water is gone?

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"Why Study Plants?" is now available in Chinese

"Why Study Plants?" is now available in Chinese | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

I can't look at this and not smile. Thanks to everybody who donated time to translate this into Chinese and several other languages, and Tom for the fabulous photos.

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Mary Williams's comment, May 16, 2013 4:13 PM
If you want to read Why Study Plants in Chinese, here's the link http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/TTPB1.xhtml
Guogen Yang's comment, May 16, 2013 10:26 PM
Thanks!