Plant Biology Tea...
Follow
Find
103.6K views | +19 today
Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
Curated by Mary Williams
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

plantlife photos

ah! plants. They eat light you know. free for free use: these pictures are released under this creative commons license enjoy!
Mary Williams's insight:

Happy Birthday to my husband, artist tom clearwood. He provides photos pro bono for the Teaching Tools, and makes them available for educational use thorugh a creative commons license. Teaching Tools users will certainly recognize some of the photos in this set... Thanks Tom!

more...
Jennifer Mach's comment, February 19, 2013 8:38 AM
Beautiful!
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Acess to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA)

Acess to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What do universities in Afghanistan, Samoa, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Guatemala, Uzbekistan and more than 100 other countries have in common? They're all eligible for free online acess to 100s of scholarly journals, including  Plant Physiology and Plant Cell, as well as "Teaching Tools in Plant Biology". (These Group A countries are shown in green on this map).

Forty other countries, shown in blue, are granted access to these and other participating journals at a very minimal cost.

 

If you know of scientists, teachers or students in one of these developing countries that isn't currently able to access these resources, please share this information with them. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

FAO: The Youth Guide to Biodiversity

FAO: The Youth Guide to Biodiversity | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Wow - nice resource! A 260 page PDF from Youth and United Nationsl Global Alliance (YUNGA http://yunga-youth.weebly.com/). Beautiful design and full of case studies and definations and links - plant and animal examples! Ch 9 is "In farmers' fields: biodiversity and agriculture".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

New Phytologist: Heavy traffic in the fast lane: long-distance signalling by macromolecules

New Phytologist: Heavy traffic in the fast lane: long-distance signalling by macromolecules | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"This review focuses on the signalling functions conveyed by the movement of macromolecules. Here, a signal is defined as the communication of information from source to destination, where it modifies development, physiology or defence through altered gene expression or by direct influences on other cellular processes."

Mary Williams's insight:

I just love this stuff. When I was a student we didn't learn about plants as integrated parts maintaining homeostasis through long-distance signals - it's all a relatively new way of understanding plants!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Of Bacteria and Men: Plant pathogen focus: Pierce's disease and the vineyards of California (2013)

Of Bacteria and Men: Plant pathogen focus: Pierce's disease and the vineyards of California (2013) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Xylella fastidiosa  is not your ordinary kind of bug. It made it to the list of the most wanted plant pathogenic bacteria in 2012! This is well deserved: X. fastidiosa can infect over a hundred species (grapevine, oleander, citrus, almonds,…), and it causes severe symptoms that can kill the infected plant. TheXylella bacteria colonize the xylem vessels, and by doing so they block the transport of water in the plant. The water-deprived leaves dry and scorch, until finally they drop to the ground.

 

Check also the video on the glassy-winged sharpshooter leafhopper.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
Hao-Xun Chang's comment, February 16, 2013 10:11 AM
I love your blog!!! I'm also study plant pathology~ I'll keep following.
Kamoun Lab @ TSL's comment, February 20, 2013 10:44 PM
Thanks for the kind comments :)
Diana Rivera's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:08 PM

This type of pathogen can be very dangerous to any grower.  The Xylella Fastidiosa can whip out an entire harvest of crops, and some people might not understand how dangerous they can be to society.  By taking out feilds of crops they are putting our natural resource in danger.  Everyone needs to eat nutricious foods, but these pathogens are threating our health.

Rescooped by Mary Williams from Rhizobium Research
Scoop.it!

Flavonoids: Their Structure, Biosynthesis and Role in the Rhizosphere, Including Allelopathy

Flavonoids: Their Structure, Biosynthesis and Role in the Rhizosphere, Including Allelopathy | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Flavonoids are biologically active low molecular weight secondary metabolites that are produced by plants, with over 10,000 structural variants now reported. Due to their physical and biochemical properties, they interact with many diverse targets in subcellular locations to elicit various activities in microbes, plants, and animals. In plants, flavonoids play important roles in transport of auxin, root and shoot development, pollination, modulation of reactive oxygen species, and signalling of symbiotic bacteria in the legume Rhizobium symbiosis. In addition, they possess antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anticancer activities. In the plant, flavonoids are transported within and between plant tissues and cells, and are specifically released into the rhizosphere by roots where they are involved in plant/plant interactions or allelopathy. Released by root exudation or tissue degradation over time, both aglycones and glycosides of flavonoids are found in soil solutions and root exudates. Although the relative role of flavonoids in allelopathic interference has been less well-characterized than that of some secondary metabolites, we present classic examples of their involvement in autotoxicity and allelopathy. We also describe their activity and fate in the soil rhizosphere in selected examples involving pasture legumes, cereal crops, and ferns. Potential research directions for further elucidation of the specific role of flavonoids in soil rhizosphere interactions are considered.

 

Weston LA, Mathesius U. (2013) J Chem Ecol. Feb 9. [Epub ahead of print]


Via IvanOresnik
more...
Mary Williams's comment, February 14, 2013 3:00 AM
This issue of Chemical Ecology also has reviews of allelopathy and cereal crops - rice, rye, sorghum http://link.springer.com/journal/10886/onlineFirst/page/1
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Rooting plant development - what's new since Dolan et al 1993 published "Cellular organisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana root"?

Rooting plant development - what's new since Dolan et al 1993 published "Cellular organisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana root"? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Here's a nice two page summary of the state-of-the field in 1993, what we've learned, and where we're going.

more...
Andres Zurita's comment, February 13, 2013 7:14 AM
great analysis, unfortunately I couldn't break the paywall :)
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
Scoop.it!

ScienceDirect.com - Current Biology - Moderation of Arabidopsis Root Stemness by CLAVATA1 and ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 Receptor Kinase Complexes

ScienceDirect.com - Current Biology - Moderation of Arabidopsis Root Stemness by CLAVATA1 and ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 Receptor Kinase Complexes | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Via Andres Zurita
more...
Andres Zurita's comment, February 12, 2013 7:24 AM
excellent! thanks for scooping it¡
Mary Williams's comment, February 12, 2013 7:40 AM
My pleasure - the integration of signals at the root meristem is one of my favorite topics!
Andres Zurita's comment, February 12, 2013 7:54 AM
Great, my favorite is root development modulation by abiotic stress
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman, on Applying New Research to Improve Science Education

Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman, on Applying New Research to Improve Science Education | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Insights from several fields on how people learn to become experts can help us to dramatically enhance the effectiveness of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.


What works, what doesn't work, and what might work?

Mary Williams's insight:

Here's one of his interesting ideas, to address the fact that university incentive systems focus almost entirely on research....

 

"A possible option would be to make a department’s eligibility to receive federal STEM research funds contingent on the reporting and publication of undergraduate teaching practices and student outcomes." - Oooh!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The impact of bad science in the headlines

The impact of bad science in the headlines | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Mary Williams's insight:

We’re putting together some information about bad science, headlines and public perception. It is, frankly, depressing.

 

“The more a technology is associated with “risk” in the media, the greater the public experiences as “risky” – this is called the ‘social amplification of risk’.”.(You can read more about that here http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0272-4332.00062/abstract).

 

Solution? Education, education, education.

 

These data are from here: http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/InfectiousDiseases/InfectionsAZ/Measles/EpidemiologicalData/

more...
Gary Stevens's curator insight, February 11, 2013 1:11 PM

Intresting correlation to explore for anyone looking for examples of poor science coverage in the media. Source of data is provided below.

Science Education 225's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:37 PM

Data in UK 

These data are from here: http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/InfectiousDiseases/InfectionsAZ/Measles/EpidemiologicalData/

Science Education 225's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:29 PM

How can you interpret these 2 graphs. Go to the source and then explain what the graphs mean in 2 or 3 sentences

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Science: Jack of All Trades, Master of Flowering

Science: Jack of All Trades, Master of Flowering | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Carbohydrates are thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of flowering, and trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) has been suggested to function as a proxy for carbohydrate status in plants. The loss of TREHALOSE-6-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 1 (TPS1) causes Arabidopsis thaliana to flower extremely late, even under otherwise inductive environmental conditions. This suggests that TPS1 is required for the timely initiation of flowering. We show that the T6P pathway affects flowering both in the leaves and at the shoot meristem, and integrate TPS1 into the existing genetic framework of flowering-time control. "

Mary Williams's insight:

Great! Trehalose-6-phophate is such an interesting molecule....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Slate: Chemophobia is bad for you

Slate: Chemophobia is bad for you | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"We are a chemophobic culture. Chemical has become a synonym for something artificial, adulterated, hazardous, or toxic. Chemicals are bad—for you, for your children, for the environment. But whatever chemophobics would like to think, there is no avoiding chemicals, no way to create chemical-free zones. Absolutely everything is made of atoms and molecules; it’s all chemistry."

Mary Williams's insight:

This is good! Is it safer to treat your ailments with "Spirit of feathers" or "Four-marvels powder" than "Naproxen" or "Amethopterin"? Why do people put more trust  in chemicals if they have warm and friendly names?

It's not just chemophobia, it's also chem-illiteracy!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
Scoop.it!

A Tripartite Growth Regulatory Cascade of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

A Tripartite Growth Regulatory Cascade of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Plant growth is regulated by a multiplicity of factors, many of which are transduced via hormone signaling. However, how these hormone signals converge to affect growth is not entirely clear (reviewed in Depuydt and Hardtke, 2011). New work from Ikeda et al. (pages 4483–4497, November 2012) and Bai et al. (pages 4917–4929) demonstrates that the cell elongation component of growth is regulated by a mechanism involving groups of three basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (some of which lack the basic domain).


Via Jennifer Mach, Andres Zurita
more...
Andres Zurita's curator insight, February 7, 2013 6:20 AM

A free Plant Cell paper

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

via Anne Osterrieder: Connect with plant scientists on social networking sites

via Anne Osterrieder: Connect with plant scientists on social networking sites | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Did you know that an increasing number of plant scientists is using social media websites to chat about their research? Most of them would be delighted to connect and discuss their work with non-ex...
Mary Williams's insight:

Did you know that Anne's made a list of over 150 plant scientists on twitter? Thanks Anne!

more...
IndianBotanists's comment, March 10, 2013 9:56 AM
Know more about this lady plant scientists http://adf.ly/Kb8En
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Food and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Nutritional assessment of transgenic lysine-rich maize compared with conventional quality protein maize

Nutritional assessment of transgenic lysine-rich maize compared with conventional quality protein maize | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The gene sb401 encoding a lysine-rich protein has been successfully integrated into the genome of maize (Zea mays), its expression showing as increased levels of lysine and total protein in maize seeds. As part of a nutritional assessment of transgenic maize, nutritional composition, especially unintended changes in key nutrients such as proximates, amino acids, minerals and vitamins as well as in antinutrient (phytate phosphorus), and protein nutritional quality were compared between transgenic maize (inbred line 642 and hybrid line Y642) and conventional quality protein maize (QPM) Nongda 108.


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd, Jeremy Cherfas
more...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

CurrOpinPlantBiol Vol 15 Issue 5 - A treasure trove of epigenetics reviews

CurrOpinPlantBiol Vol 15 Issue 5 - A treasure trove of epigenetics reviews | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We're revising one of the most popular Teaching Tools, TTPB4 "Epigenetics". A double espresso and this fine collection of reviews is a good place to start. Look for the updated materials in March!

more...
Mary Williams's comment, February 15, 2013 8:12 AM
And the May 2012 Special Issue of Plant Cell Physiol on Epigenetics is HERE (http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/pcp/specialfocusissue_plant_epigenetics.html)
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

3-D Molecular Designs - Molecular Education Products

3-D Molecular Designs - Molecular Education Products | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
3D Molecular Designs (with the Center for Biomolecular Modeling) creates hand-held molecular models in a variety of types and formats to assist in science education.
Mary Williams's insight:

This is a fun (but pricey) site! Check out the posters by David Goodsell. I used to have a poster of Inside a Human Cell on my wall and I loved it but lost it. Now I can get a new one! It is one of the few images that I think conveys the density and complexity of a cell.

more...
sonia ramos's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:02 AM

Para Educadores con presupuesto...

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Trends in Plant Science - Plant chemical defense: at what cost?

Trends in Plant Science - Plant chemical defense: at what cost? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Just how costly are specialized metabolites? Maybe not very - this opinion article suggests that "secondary metabolites serve auxiliary roles, including functions associated with primary metabolism. ..The costs of plant chemical defense can be offset by multifunctional biosynthesis and the optimization of primary metabolism. These additional benefits may negate the trade-off between primary and secondary metabolism,"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking Part 1: A Valuable Argument

Part 1 of the TechNyou critical thinking resource. The resource covers basic logic and faulty arguments, developing student's critical thinking skills.

Mary Williams's insight:

Fantastic set of short animated videos that help students to understand logic and fallacies, using examples from science (vaccinations, climate change, safe energy etc). VERY worth your time!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
Scoop.it!

APSR1, a novel gene required for meristem maintenance, is negatively regulated by low phosphate availability- Plant Science

APSR1, a novel gene required for meristem maintenance, is negatively regulated by low phosphate availability- Plant Science | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Via Andres Zurita
more...
Andres Zurita's curator insight, February 11, 2013 6:46 AM
Proper root growth is crucial for anchorage, exploration, and exploitation of the soil substrate. Root growth is highly sensitive to a variety of environmental cues, among them water and nutrient availability have a great impact on root development. Phosphorus (P) availability is one of the most limiting nutrients that affect plant growth and development under natural and agricultural environments. Root growth in the direction of the long axis proceeds from the root tip and requires the coordinated activities of cell proliferation, cell elongation and cell differentiation. Here we report a novel gene, APSR1 (Altered Phosphate Starvation Response1), involved in root meristem maintenance. The loss of function mutant apsr1-1 showed a reduction in primary root length and root apical meristem size, short differentiated epidermal cells and long root hairs. Expression of APSR1 gene decreases in response to phosphate starvation and apsr1-1 did not show the typical progressive decrease of undifferentiated cells at root tip when grown under P limiting conditions. Interestingly, APSR1 expression pattern overlaps with root zones of auxin accumulation. Furthermore,apsr1-1 showed a clear decrease in the level of the auxin transporter PIN7. These data suggest that APSR1is required for the coordination of cell processes necessary for correct root growth in response to phosphate starvation conceivably by direct or indirect modulation of PIN7. We also propose, based on its nuclear localization and structure, that APSR1 may potentially be a member of a novel group of transcription factors.

My Favourite Mutant by far!!!

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Make your own attention-grabbing images

Make your own attention-grabbing images | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Mary Williams's insight:

I made this - make your own memorable image here - give your students a giggle

 

http://thrilling-tales.webomator.com/derange-o-lab/pulp-o-mizer/pulp-o-mizer.html

more...
Jennifer Mach's comment, February 11, 2013 9:43 AM
Hilarious!
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Kevin Zelnio's moving personal account of leaving science

Kevin Zelnio's moving personal account of leaving science | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Today I end a 5-year run at Deep Sea News. I'm sad that I am unable to continuing committing to this great group, and indeed science and science communication more generally.
Mary Williams's insight:

I think you'll enjoy reading this very personal account of Kevin's sometimes frustrating experiences as a scientist and science writer. From unsupportive and obstructionist PhD advisors to money worries, stress, and the struggle to spend time with children, but finally a new start. Go Kevin!

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Science: Losing Arable Land, China Faces Stark Choice: Adapt or Go Hungry

Science: Losing Arable Land, China Faces Stark Choice: Adapt or Go Hungry | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Must read article from Science.

"Across the globe, scientists and policy-makers are studying how climate change will affect agriculture. But in China, the question is especially urgent. The country has roughly 20% of the world's population but only 7% of its arable land—a share that is shrinking in the face of rapid urbanization"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism: Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship

Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism: Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

$10,000 fellowship, application due April 1, to write about food or farming.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Atlantic: What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

Atlantic: What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world
more...
No comment yet.