Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
130.6K views | +15 today
Follow
Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
Curated by Mary Williams
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

C2-domain Abscisic acid-Related (CAR) proteins mediate the interaction of ABA receptors with the plasma membrane

C2-domain Abscisic acid-Related (CAR) proteins mediate the interaction of ABA receptors with the plasma membrane | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles."


Read the In Brief here (opens PDF) http://www.plantcell.org/content/early/2014/12/02/tpc.114.134411.full.pdf+html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

This Will Revolutionize Education - YouTube

Many technologies have promised to revolutionize education, but so far none has. With that in mind, what could revolutionize education?

Mary Williams's insight:

Excellent video

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

New Phytologist: Meetings - A snapshot of molecular plant–microbe interaction research (2014)

New Phytologist: Meetings - A snapshot of molecular plant–microbe interaction research (2014) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Plants and microbes are in a continuous arms race to maintain their predominance within their particular niche. Understanding the complexity of these plant–microbe interactions is of utmost importance as it can provide new insights into the mechanisms mediating disease processes and in turn inspire new plant breeding strategies. The International Society for Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions (IS-MPMI) invited scientists from around the world to share their findings during the XVI International Congress on Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions, which was held on the beautiful island of Rhodes in Greece. The congress was organized by the Agricultural University of Athens, the Hellenic Phytopathology Society, and the Hellenic Society of Phytiatry and provided over 1100 participants from 55 countries with the opportunity to present and discuss their current and future research. A great number of talks and posters were presented, however our aim within this report is to provide a snapshot of the discipline by focusing on just some of the exciting research and discussions which took place. The key topics discussed were virulence factors, epigenetic regulation, hormones, symbiosis factors, toxins, signaling pathways, microbe recognition, immunity, and pathogen diagnostics. Effector biology was also a recurrent theme in many plenary and concurrent sessions, indicating the importance of a topic that was also highlighted recently by a Virtual Special Issue in New Phytologist (see Kuhn & Panstruga, 2014). In addition to this, throughout the meeting next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques were described and shown to be shedding new light on long-standing issues in microbial ecology.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Wed 3 Dec debate - (live stream) Genetically Modified Food

Wed 3 Dec debate - (live stream) Genetically Modified Food | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

New York time  6:45 - 8:40 PM (that's 23:45 GMT)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Carnivorous plant fossil trapped in amber

Carnivorous plant fossil trapped in amber | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Rare fossils of a carnivorous plant have been found preserved in a piece of Baltic amber.
Mary Williams's insight:

That's cool. Here's a link the the article in PNAS http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/11/25/1414777111

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

For your plant nutrition class...

For your plant nutrition class... | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plant immunity and legume symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Plasmodesmata in integrated cell signalling: insights from development and environmental signals and stresses

Plasmodesmata in integrated cell signalling: insights from development and environmental signals and stresses | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
To survive as sedentary organisms built of immobile cells, plants require an effective intercellular communication system, both locally between neighbouring cells within each tissue and systemically across distantly located organs. Such a system enables cells to coordinate their intracellular activities and produce concerted responses to internal and external stimuli. Plasmodesmata, membrane-lined intercellular channels, are essential for direct cell-to-cell communication involving exchange of diffusible factors, including signalling and information molecules. Recent advances corroborate that plasmodesmata are not passive but rather highly dynamic channels, in that their density in the cell walls and gating activities are tightly linked to developmental and physiological processes. Moreover, it is becoming clear that specific hormonal signalling pathways play crucial roles in relaying primary cellular signals to plasmodesmata. In this review, we examine a number of studies in which plasmodesmal structure, occurrence, and/or permeability responses are found to be altered upon given cellular or environmental signals, and discuss common themes illustrating how plasmodesmal regulation is integrated into specific cellular signalling pathways.

Via Christophe Jacquet
more...
Jennifer Mach's curator insight, November 30, 2014 8:42 AM

Not so sure about the use of "sedentary" here. Are plants just sittin' around?

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Biosynthesis, regulation, and domestication of bitterness in cucumber

Biosynthesis, regulation, and domestication of bitterness in cucumber | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

From Science - this is a good article to read with students. It's a straightforward use of genomics and biochemistry to map bitter flavor traits, and it reveals something about selection during domestication.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

English Communication for Scientists- Free eBook

English Communication for Scientists- Free eBook | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Chapters include:

more...
Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:38 PM

VERY nice tool for students!

Karen McKee's curator insight, November 29, 2014 9:15 AM

Excellent resource....from how to structure a journal article to how to talk to a mixed audience of specialists and nonspecialists.

s.kameswara rao's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:06 PM

very good

Rescooped by Mary Williams from MycorWeb Plant-Microbe Interactions
Scoop.it!

Global diversity and geography of soil fungi

Global diversity and geography of soil fungi | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Fungi play major roles in ecosystem processes, but the determinants of fungal diversity and biogeographic patterns remain poorly understood. Using DNA metabarcoding data from hundreds of globally distributed soil samples, we demonstrate that fungal richness is decoupled from plant diversity. The plant-to-fungus richness ratio declines exponentially toward the poles. Climatic factors, followed by edaphic and spatial variables, constitute the best predictors of fungal richness and community composition at the global scale. Fungi show similar latitudinal diversity gradients to other organisms, with several notable exceptions. These findings advance our understanding of global fungal diversity patterns and permit integration of fungi into a general macroecological framework.

Via Francis Martin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing

Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Visualised in graphs I am presenting the long-term data on how we are changing our world. This is the Empirical View on How We Are Making Our World a Better Place. Topic by topic I cover the decline of violence and the increase of tolerance and political rights. Improving living standards, health and well-being; population changes and associated success in preserving our environment. Increasing knowledge about our word and spreading education.
Mary Williams's insight:

This is an excellent set of graphs / data collections curated by Max Roser (Oxford). See for example this one on food and hunger http://bit.ly/1k8i9cs 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

15 Tips For Facilitating Online Discussion | Edudemic

15 Tips For Facilitating Online Discussion | Edudemic | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Facilitating discussions between students is one of those things that is infinitely easier when you’re teaching in a physical classroom rather than online. When the students are all in one room, discussions happen more naturally. Facilitating the same type of productive, useful discussion when teaching online is more of a challenge.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Irmgard Huppe's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:13 AM

short and sharp collection of a few important pointers

Rich Schultz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:54 AM

Online discussion tips!

Almudena Rueda's curator insight, February 7, 2015 1:17 PM

Another great Infographics from Edudemic.

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Nikolai Vavilov, botanist/ plant breeder (25 November 1887 - 1943)

Nikolai Vavilov, botanist/ plant breeder (25 November 1887 - 1943) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

25 November is the anniversary of the birth of botanist / plant breeder Nikolai Vavilov (1887 - 1943). "His vision was of a plant science that united the work of physiologists, cytologists, geneticists, systematists and biochemists; that was international and co-operative in character."
If you have a subscription to Nature you can read this incredibly moving obituary that describes his scientific accomplishments and tragic, premature death.
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v156/n3969/abs/156621a0.html
If not, here's a bio from John Innes Center https://www.jic.ac.uk/centenary/timeline/info/NIVavilov.htm and of course there's wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Vavilov

more...
AckerbauHalle's curator insight, November 25, 2014 4:23 PM

Heute morgen in der Vorlesung; jetzt finde ich noch, dass heute der Geburtstag von Vavilov wäre

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

(New Plant Cell Review) Phytochromes: An Atomic Perspective on Photoactivation and Signaling

(New Plant Cell Review) Phytochromes: An Atomic Perspective on Photoactivation and Signaling | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Whereas the downstream signaling cascades and biological consequences have been described, the initial events that underpin photochemistry of the coupled bilin chromophore and the ensuing conformational changes needed to propagate the light signal are only now being understood. Especially informative has been the rapidly expanding collection of 3D models developed by x-ray crystallographic, NMR, and single-particle electron microscopic methods from a remarkably diverse array of bacterial Phys. These structures have revealed how the modular architecture of these dimeric photoreceptors engages the buried chromophore through distinctive knot, hairpin, and helical spine features."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Botanical Accuracy: White lichens, green mosses, and Swedish Christmas...

Botanical Accuracy: White lichens, green mosses, and Swedish Christmas... | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Moss or lichen? Follow the link for a video

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe

Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Biotech companies are inserting new genes into microorganisms, turning them into tiny factories to produce valuable nutrients and flavors. But many of them don't want to talk about it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Kirk Broders | Center for International Education

Kirk Broders | Center for International Education | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Nice story about Kirk Broders' (Univ New Hampshire) travels to Mexico to examine the microbiome of beans at their center of origin and domestication

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Support World Soil Day and the International Year of Soils 2015 - YouTube

"Animated video produced by the Global Soil Partnership promoting the creation of a UN World Soil Day and the adoption of 2015 as the International Year of Soils"

Mary Williams's insight:

You can find lots of resources about soil here http://www.fao.org/soils-2015/en/, in multiple languages too. 2015 is the International Year of Soils, and Dec 5 is World Soil Day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The Role of 4R Nutrient Stewardship in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emission - YouTube

The International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI) explains how farmers make 4R decisions (i.e., decisions on applying the Right source at the Right rate, Right time, and Right place) to minimize greenhouse gas emissions resulting from their nitrogen fertilizer applications. 4R Nutrient Stewardship promotes the best management practices that help farmers maximize the economic, social, and environmental performance of their nutrient applications.

Mary Williams's insight:

Good animated video!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

A Visual Approach to Scientific Communication

A Visual Approach to Scientific Communication | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Reflections from the SEA-PHAGES Symposium
Mary Williams's insight:

Here's an inspiring presentation style to share with your students - it's very effective!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

How Is The Internet Changing Education? | Edudemic

How Is The Internet Changing Education? | Edudemic | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Mary Williams's insight:

Did you know that the UK Open University started broadcasting lectures on TV in 1971, and is currently the UK's largest university with 250,000 students?

Did you know that by 2019 it is expected byat 50% of all classes taught will be delivered online (that's 5 years from now...).

It's clear to me that how we teach is changing rapidly, with both good and bad effects. I'm contributing to a conference in London mid-December and we're going to try to sort out the good from the bad, and identify strategies to enhance the former whilst minimizing the latter!

http://www.sebiology.org/meetings/EPA2014/teaching.html

more...
J. Steven Sprenger ✔'s curator insight, November 28, 2014 10:17 AM

Great to see the success of e-learning continues to grow, especially exciting having worked for KnowledgePlanet, helping to trailblaze and sell e-learning and knowledgge management systems to early corporate adopters. 

Rescooped by Mary Williams from MycorWeb Plant-Microbe Interactions
Scoop.it!

Arabidopsis PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 genes PHT1;8 and PHT1;9 are involved in root-to-shoot translocation of orthophosphate

Arabidopsis PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 genes PHT1;8 and PHT1;9 are involved in root-to-shoot translocation of orthophosphate | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
BackgroundIn plants, the uptake from soil and intercellular transport of inorganic phosphate (Pi) is mediated by the PHT1 family of membrane-spanning proton : Pi symporters. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtPHT1 gene family comprises nine putative high-affinity Pi transporters. While AtPHT1;1 to AtPHT1;4 are involved in Pi acquisition from the rhizosphere, the role of the remaining transporters is less clear.ResultsPi uptake and tissue accumulation studies in AtPHT1;8 and AtPHT1;9 knock-out mutants compared to wild-type plants showed that both transporters are involved in the translocation of Pi from the root to the shoot. Upon inactivation of AtPHT1;9, changes in the transcript profiles of several genes that respond to plant phosphorus (P) status indicated a possible role in the regulation of systemic signaling of P status within the plant. Potential genetic interactions were found among PHT1 transporters, as the transcript profile of AtPHT1;5 and AtPHT1;7 was altered in the absence of AtPHT1;8, and the transcript profile of AtPHT1;7 was altered in the Atpht1;9 mutant. These results indicate that AtPHT1;8 and AtPHT1;9 translocate Pi from the root to the shoot, but not from the soil solution into the root.ConclusionAtPHT1;8 and AtPHT1;9 are likely to act sequentially in the interior of the plant during the root-to-shoot translocation of Pi, and play a more complex role in the acclimation of A. thaliana to changes in Pi supply than was previously thought.

Via Christophe Jacquet, Francis Martin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

IRRI - The benefits of safe and responsible use of modern biotechnology

IRRI - The benefits of safe and responsible use of modern biotechnology | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
IRRI is a nonprofit research and education center established to reduce poverty and hunger, improve the health of rice farmers and consumers, and ensure environmental sustainability.
more...
Patricia Hernández's curator insight, November 30, 2014 6:11 AM

Responsible use of modern biotehnology

 

The regulation is important because it tries to maintain a balance between science and society. Since science aims to help society, never harm her. We need to regulate the marketing of chemicals to avoid risks. To do this we have a number of rules in the biotechnological field to be met. These rules have to keep improving to suit mordern biotechnology.

 
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Embracing Dry Land: Water-Smart Urban Design and Drought in the American West | JSTOR Daily

Embracing Dry Land: Water-Smart Urban Design and Drought in the American West | JSTOR Daily | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Water-smart urban design and drought in the American West
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

U.S. Universities Step Up to Fight Hunger

U.S. Universities Step Up to Fight Hunger | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Since 1978, the U.S. Government has supported research programs led by some of the United States’ most prestigious academic institutions in order to help achieve sustained growth in agriculture and reduction in poverty. These programs have also provided long-term degree training in food security-related fields to more than 4,200 students from 130 countries.
Mary Williams's insight:

You can read more about the research projects supported by the Feed the Future program here http://feedthefuture.gov/article/feed-future-innovation-labs

more...
No comment yet.