Plant Biology Tea...
Follow
Find
86.1K views | +9 today
Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
Curated by Mary Williams
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Botanic gardens in modern society - Ockham's Razor - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Botanic gardens in modern society - Ockham's Razor - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Botanic gardens are beautiful and peaceful places. But they are far more than simply places to relax.
Mary Williams's insight:

Interesting history of botanic gardens!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Communicate Science: Is "gardening" killing plant science?

Communicate Science: Is "gardening" killing plant science? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Interesting question! Have a look...

http://www.communicatescience.eu/2013/07/is-gardening-killing-plant-science.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

How the internet changed science - AoB Blog

How the internet changed science - AoB Blog | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

At SEB2013 Prof Rodriguez talked about the history of communication in science starting with the 80s, a time without computers or the internet.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Plant Phys July Issue

Plant Phys July Issue | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The lovely photo is by Tom Donald who donates lots of plant images to Teaching Tools in Plant Biology.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/clearwood/sets/72157626284715720/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Kew Gardens - Beyond the Gardens - The Forgotten Home of Coffee

Nice video about coffee!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

New York Times Video: Test Tube Tomato - looking back at Flavr Savr

New York Times Video: Test Tube Tomato - looking back at Flavr Savr | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Retro Report: In the 1990s, entrepreneurs and scientists brought the first genetically engineered food to market.The business crashed but biotechnology has flourished far beyond the produce aisle.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Recent PhDs - Science & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists

Recent PhDs - Science & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Write an essay on your PhD research for a chance to win a big prize in Stockholm! Check out the rules of eligibility - you must have had your PhD awarded between Jan 1 2011 and Dec 31, 2012.

 

Apply by August 15, 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Molecular Plant Pathology: Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology

Molecular Plant Pathology: Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Yay! This OA review joins the list of excellent MPP "Top 10s" including viruses, bacteria and fungi. Let's hear it for the multicellular animal parasites! Can you guess which species is number one? (Hint - it's the one affecting the plant in this photo).

Thanks to the USDA's amazing Scott Bauer for this photo http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1323037.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

stripped

stripped | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
sycamore
Mary Williams's insight:

I think the very hungry caterpillar's been busy

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Rhizobium Research
Scoop.it!

Ectopic expression of miR160 results in auxin hypersensitivity, cytokinin hyposensitivity, and inhibition of symbiotic nodule development in soybean.

Ectopic expression of miR160 results in auxin hypersensitivity, cytokinin hyposensitivity, and inhibition of symbiotic nodule development in soybean. | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Symbiotic root nodules in leguminous plants result from interaction between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria. There are two major types of legume nodules, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate nodules do not have a persistent meristem while indeterminate nodules have a persistent meristem. Auxin is thought to play a role in the development of both these types of nodules. However, inhibition of rootward auxin transport at the site of nodule initiation is crucial for the development of indeterminate nodules, but not determinate nodules. Using the synthetic auxin-responsive DR5 promoter in soybean, we show that there is relatively low auxin activity during determinate nodule initiation and that it is restricted to the nodule periphery subsequently during development. To examine if and what role auxin plays in determinate nodule development, we generated soybean composite plants with altered sensitivity to auxin. We over-expressed microRNA393 to silence the auxin receptor gene family and these roots were hyposensitive to auxin. These roots nodulated normally suggesting that only minimal/reduced auxin signaling is required for determinate nodule development. We over-expressed microRNA160 to silence a set of repressor ARF transcription factors and these roots were hypersensitive to auxin. These roots were not impaired in epidermal responses to rhizobia, but had significantly reduced nodule primordium formation suggesting that auxin hypersensitivity inhibits nodule development. These roots were also hyposensitive to cytokinin, and had attenuated expression of key nodulation-associated transcription factors known to be regulated by cytokinin. We propose a regulatory feedback loop involving auxin and cytokinin during nodulation.

 

Turner M, Nizampatnam NR, Baron M, Coppin S, Damodaran S, Adhikari S, Arunachalam S, Yu O, Subramanian S. (2013).  Plant Physiol. Jun 24. [Epub ahead of print]


Via IvanOresnik
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Put Down Oil Drill, Pick Up The Test Tube: Making Fuel From Yeast : NPR

Put Down Oil Drill, Pick Up The Test Tube: Making Fuel From Yeast : NPR | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Synthetic biologist Jay Keasling has already taught yeast to make the leading anti-malarial drug. His next project takes the technology a step further, using yeast to turn plant waste into diesel — and maybe gasoline and jet fuel, too.
Mary Williams's insight:

It's a nice article, and I'm a fan of Jay Keasling's work, but I object to the headline - it's not "Making fuel from yeast", it's "Yeast making fuel from plants"!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Fellowship at FDA for plant molecular biologist - apply NOW

Fellowship at FDA for plant molecular biologist - apply NOW | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

FDA’s Division of Biotechnology and GRAS Notice Review is looking for an ORISE fellow with qualifications in plant biology, molecular biology, and other appropriate fields to provide research support (data collection and analysis; non-laboratory) to our Biotechnology Consultation Program. 

 

FDA’s Division of Biotechnology and GRAS Notice Review (DBGNR) is responsible for the evaluation of safety and nutritional assessments, which are submitted to FDA by developers of new plant varieties intended for food and feed uses.  To this end, DBGNR must keep abreast of advances in the science of genetic engineering as well as of industry and academic trends in the new plant variety development, including methodology and traits. This project involves training in the evaluation of biotechnology safety and nutritional assessments under FDA’s Biotechnology Consultation Program.  The participant will be expected to use this knowledge to identify and analyze the impacts of recent scientific advances and plant breeding trends to the Agency’s biotechnology policy and to provide science-based support for program improvement or further research directions.

 

For more specific information please contact Carrie.McMahon@fda.hhs.gov.

 

We are actively seeking candidates and hope to fill the position before the end of July.

 

For information on ORISE fellowships:  http://orise.orau.gov/science-education/internships-scholarships-fellowships/default.aspx

 

Mary Williams's insight:

I'm not sure if US Citizenship is required - I'll email Carrie and post the answer. This looks like a good opportunity to experience (and get experience at) public policy careers.

 

more...
Mary Williams's comment, July 5, 2013 3:29 PM
The word is, there is no restriction on citizenship, and it's a one or two year position.
FOOD TECHNOLOGIST's curator insight, July 25, 2013 11:03 PM

Fellowship at FDA for plant molecular biologist - apply NOW

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Another great story from the Sydney botanic gardens - Wollemi

Another great story from the Sydney botanic gardens - Wollemi | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

This tree is Wollemia nobilis, the Wollemi pine. Its history is a great story - you can read about it here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wollemi_pine and http://www.wollemipine.com/fast_facts.php). It's been called "One of the greatest botanical discoveries of our time", and it's a very rare tree once thought to be extinct. After a few individuals were found (in a still secret location), they were propagated, and the progeny sold for large amounts of money, which was used for further botanical research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

EMBOReports: Inheritance of poor writing habits

EMBOReports: Inheritance of poor writing habits | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

This requires a subscription, but it's worth whatever effort it takes - share with your students!

http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v14/n7/full/embor201376a.html

more...
Mary Williams's comment, July 6, 2013 5:13 AM
Good resource for teaching, w/ examples of BAD writing.
Bradford Condon's comment, July 6, 2013 9:26 AM
"The volume of scientific literature is enormous, but it is largely inaccessible to non-expert readers, including scientists from other fields. This is not just because the content is highly specialized but also because scientific writing itself is far from simple and clear.

To read this article in full you may need to log in, make a payment or gain access through a site license "
Bradford Condon's comment, July 6, 2013 9:30 AM
I just loved the paywall message right below the abstract. Scientific literature is largely inaccessible indeed.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Macro Timelapse

Kamera und Schnitt: Daniel Csobot www.danic.me www.novalapse.com Technik: Canon 7D Kessler CineSlider Canon EF 100mm Macro Canon 15-85mm Fotozelt Tageslichtlampen Lizenzierung…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Nature: Agriculture: Feeding the future

Nature: Agriculture: Feeding the future | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

A call to genotype and phenotype plants stored in seed banks to bring their genetic diversity into our food system. The authors say it would cost $200 million a year - about the cost of one fighter jet!

 

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v499/n7456/full/499023a.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Plant Cell: A Spatio-Temporal Understanding of Growth Regulation during the Salt Stress Response in Arabidopsis

Plant Cell: A Spatio-Temporal Understanding of Growth Regulation during the Salt Stress Response in Arabidopsis | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Plant environmental responses involve dynamic changes in growth and signaling, yet little is understood as to how progress through these events is regulated. Here, we explored the phenotypic and transcriptional events involved in the acclimation of the Arabidopsis thaliana seedling root to a rapid change in salinity. Using live-imaging analysis, we show that growth is dynamically regulated with a period of quiescence followed by recovery then homeostasis. Through the use of a new high-resolution spatio-temporal transcriptional map, we identify the key hormone signaling pathways that regulate specific transcriptional programs, predict their spatial domain of action, and link the activity of these pathways to the regulation of specific phases of growth."

Mary Williams's insight:

Wow! An amazing description of a root responding to a stressful shift in its environment. All those cells perceiving physicochemical and molecular signals, communicating amongst themselves and signaling to each other - biology at its most beautiful!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

PlantPhys: Lifting DELLA repression of Arabidopsis seed germination by non-proteolytic GA signaling

PlantPhys: Lifting DELLA repression of Arabidopsis seed germination by non-proteolytic GA signaling | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"DELLA repression of Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination can be lifted either through DELLA proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or through proteolysis-independent GA hormone signaling."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from Plant Gene Seeker -PGS
Scoop.it!

Annals of Botany, SPECIAL ISSUE: Matching Roots to Environment

Annals of Botany, SPECIAL ISSUE: Matching Roots to Environment | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Via Andres Zurita
more...
Andres Zurita's curator insight, July 2, 2013 9:15 AM
Matching roots to their environment 

Plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature, and their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. White et al. (pp. 207–222) examine how the roots of land plants evolved, describe how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres affects the utilization of soil resources, and discuss the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. They then describe the roles of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrate root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of soil resources, and discuss high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, they consider how adaptations to root systems might enable sustainable agriculture in the future.

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

PNAS: Activation of dimeric ABA receptors elicits guard cell closure, ABA-regulated gene expression, and drought tolerance

PNAS: Activation of dimeric ABA receptors elicits guard cell closure, ABA-regulated gene expression, and drought tolerance | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Nice work - a new ABA agonist identified, quinabactin, that preferentially interacts with a subsest of ABA receptors and confers drought-stress tolerance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

MECCANO "Plants Connect People" project - unigue fundraising effort

Scientists collaborate with musicians in novel fundraising effort - the proceeds from sales of the album and songs will be used for plant science outreach and education! Check them out here on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UITv4_kITFY) and also on itunes https://itunes.apple.com/it/album/plants-connect-people/id663429151.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Paul Nurse Editorial -"Enough rhetoric. It's evidence that should shape key public decisions"

Paul Nurse Editorial -"Enough rhetoric. It's evidence that should shape key public decisions" | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"It should be remembered that there is rarely a right or wrong answer on these sorts of issues, although some people of faith who deal more in moral absolutes might disagree with me. There are always people who have 100% conviction in their views but, as a general rule, when society is looking for the best outcome it should take such absolutist views with a pinch of salt. If you start out with certainties you are unlikely to have considered all the evidence or maybe any of the evidence."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Genome Biology: Special issue on plants

Genome Biology: Special issue on plants | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Here you can find editorials, reviews, research and opinion papers!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

HHMI News: Newly identified gene Sr35 protects wheat plants from stem rust

HHMI News: Newly identified gene Sr35 protects wheat plants from stem rust | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Here's a link to the paper just out in Science, "Identification of Wheat Gene Sr35 That Confers Resistance to Ug99 Stem Rust Race Group"

(www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2013/06/26/science.1239022.abstract)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources

From Bacillus coahuilensis, a strategy to extend phosphate resources | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

It was super to hear Luis Herrera-Estrella share this exciting work at the ICAR meeting. Luis has been investigating the problem of phosphate limitation for much of his career - see more here: (http://www.hhmi.org/research/sirs/herrera_estrella.html).

 

The work, recently published in Nature Biotechnology (http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v30/n9/full/nbt.2346.html) explores the use of phosphite, a reduced version of phospate, as a dual purpose fertilizer and weed killer. His work suggests that by using phosphite, the limited global reserves could serve our needs for twice as long as if we continue to use it as phosphate.

 

One of the interesting things I learned from his talk is about the source of the enzyme phosphite oxidoreductase. It was found in Bacillus coahuilensis, which lives in a very nutrient-poor environment, Cuatro Ciénegas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuatro_Ci%C3%A9negas). This unique environment is one of only a few places you can find living stromatolites (colonies of cyanobacteia) - Shark Bay, Western Australia is the other well-known place to see them.

more...
Jorge Sáenz Mata's curator insight, June 27, 2013 2:34 PM

Interesting!! Investigadores Mexicanos!!