Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
139.6K views | +3 today
Follow
Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
Curated by Mary Williams
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Tansley Review: Adaptation in flower form: a comparative evodevo approach (good for teaching)

Adaptation in flower form: a comparative evodevo approach
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

People in white coats: Movie science vs real life (13)

People in white coats: Movie science vs real life (13) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The Altmetric System

The Altmetric System | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
In the budding field of article-level metrics, Altmetric has been leading the way in measuring the attention and impact of research papers beyond the archaic method of counting citations. Founder Euan Adie sheds light on the inadequacy of journal-level metrics, the future relationship between academia and Twitter, and the work that goes on behind the scenes at Altmetric
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Punctual Transcriptional Regulation by the Rice Circadian Clock under Fluctuating Field Conditions (Plant Cell)

Punctual Transcriptional Regulation by the Rice Circadian Clock under Fluctuating Field Conditions (Plant Cell) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Using hundreds of samples of field-grown rice (Oryza sativa) leaves, we developed a statistical model for the expression of circadian clock-related genes integrating diurnally entrained circadian clock with phase setting by light, both responses to light and temperature gated by the circadian clock. We show that expression of individual genes was strongly affected by temperature. However, internal time estimated from expression of multiple genes, which may reflect transcriptional regulation of downstream genes, is punctual to 22 min and not affected by weather, daylength, or plant developmental age in the field. Thus, we demonstrated that the circadian clock is a regulatory network of multiple genes that retains accurate physical time of day by integrating the perturbations on individual genes under fluctuating environments in the field.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Preparing Solutions - Parts 1 - 3: Calculating Molar or % Concentrations and diluting stock solutions

Three useful videos for students starting out in the lab.
Part 1 - Calculating molar concentrations (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOwdQRBENJQ)
Part 2 - Calculating % concentrations (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVNpFP2Wmlc)
Part 3 - Dilutions from stock solutions (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHx4nqRdpMg)
From University of Glasgow


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn — HHMI BioInteractive Video - YouTube

Where did corn come from? Genetic and archeological data point to what may seem like an unlikely ancestor. Discover the secret of corn in this HHMI BioInteractive video.

more...
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Oh, the Lonesome, Woesome Tumbleweed

Oh, the Lonesome, Woesome Tumbleweed | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
I saw my first tumbleweed while driving through Oklahoma. Who knew they could be so cool? Or dangerous...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Our new article in F1000Research, "Digital teaching tools and global learning communities"

Our new article in F1000Research, "Digital teaching tools and global learning communities" | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We're pretty excited about our new article in F1000Research, "Digital teaching tools and global learning communities". Read the article here http://f1000research.com/articles/4-59/v1 and the executive summary blog post here http://blog.aspb.org/…/digital-teaching-tools-and-global-l…/.
Please share and comment - we're learning by doing, and want your ideas and suggestions. Thanks!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Helping the "Plant Blind" to See. Nice essay by Chris Martine

Helping the "Plant Blind" to See. Nice essay by Chris Martine | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Guest blogger and Bucknell University professor Chris Martine, Ph.D., talks about guiding students away from their electronic devices and into the plant world."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

International Women's Day - CIMMYT honors "Superwomen of Wheat and Maize"

International Women's Day - CIMMYT honors "Superwomen of Wheat and Maize" | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

In anticipation of International Women's Day next Sunday, CIMMYT has curated a set of "Superwomen of wheat and maize" - check them out, an impressive group! Nice photos too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

What makes a popular science video on YouTube

What makes a popular science video on YouTube | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Everyone's looking for an audience for their videos on YouTube, and there are plenty of science videos out there. But not all are popular so what makes one more interesting than another?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Writing Good Multiple Choice Test Questions | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Writing Good Multiple Choice Test Questions | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Vanderbilt University
Mary Williams's insight:

This is really useful

more...
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, March 2, 2015 12:04 PM

With the nationwide emphasis of student growth on teacher evaluation, educators are going to need to become proficient creators of local assessments that actually determine learning as an outcome of instruction and practice with concepts. Most of today's teachers do not feel competent in this realm. Here are some good steps to begin changing assessment from an outside provider to assessment as a true indicator of what kids are learning in schools today. 

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Humble plants that hide surprising secrets

Humble plants that hide surprising secrets | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
In this intriguing talk, biologist Ameenah Gurib-Fakim introduces us to rare plant species from isolated islands and regions of Africa. Meet the shape-shifting benjoin; the baume de l'ile plate, which might offer a new treatment for asthma; and the iconic baobab tree, which could hold the key to the future of food. Plus: monkey apples.
Mary Williams's insight:

This is a super talk. Teaching idea. Assign students the task of watching this video, and then exploring the Red List for other endangered plants (http://discover.iucnredlist.org/). They could write a summary of their selected plant and its habitat to share in small group discussions in class.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

How do plants remember - Professor Caroline Dean - YouTube

Professor Caroline Dean OBE FRS, winner of a BBSRC Excellence in Bioscience Award and the 2015 FEBS/EMBO Women in Science award, discusses the focus of her c...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The Promises and Perils of Synthetic Biology

The Promises and Perils of Synthetic Biology | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Synbio was going to save the world. Now it’s being used to make vanilla flavoring.
Mary Williams's insight:

Definitely worth reading - good for classroom discussions too. Is a flavor molecule different if it's extracted from a plant, an engineered yeast or algae, or made entirely synthetically? How does the drop in oil prices affect biofuels research? What's the role of government in funding alternative energy sources? Is "synbio" a scary term for consumers, and if so what would be a better alternative?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Chemists Know - (Parody of "Let It Go" from Frozen) - University of California Irvine - YouTube

What a brilliant video - makes me want to be a chemist :)


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The Ubiquitin Receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 Redundantly Regulate Endoreduplication by Modulating the Stability of TCP14/15 in Arabidopsis

The Ubiquitin Receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 Redundantly Regulate Endoreduplication by Modulating the Stability of TCP14/15 in Arabidopsis | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Here, we show that DA1 and its close family members DAR1 and DAR2 are redundantly required for endoreduplication during leaf development. DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 physically interact with the transcription factors TCP14 and TCP15, which repress endoreduplication by directly regulating the expression of cell-cycle genes. We also show that DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 modulate the stability of TCP14 and TCP15 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.
more...
AG Hofmann's curator insight, April 22, 2015 5:33 PM

DA1 is a homolog of Wss1 and Spartan

Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Do you know an outstanding undergraduate science teacher? (Maybe you?)

Do you know an outstanding undergraduate science teacher? (Maybe you?) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The Society for College Science Teachers soliticits nominations (including self-nominations) for the Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher Award. Application deadline is June 1. See website for more information http://www.scst.org/grants/ousta


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Williams from GMOs & Sustainable agriculture
Scoop.it!

Nature Biotechnology: Engineering insect-free cereals (2015)

Nature Biotechnology: Engineering insect-free cereals (2015) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

A cluster of three rice lectin receptor kinases confers resistance to planthopper insects.

 

Insect pests reduce yields of crops worldwide through direct damage and because they spread devastating viral diseases. In Asia, the brown planthopper (BPH) decimates rice (Oryza sativa) crops, causing the loss of billions of dollars annually1. In this issue, Liu et al.2 report the cloning of a rice genetic locus that confers broad-spectrum resistance to BPH and at least one other planthopper species (white back planthopper). Introducing this locus into plant genomes is likely to provide an effective means of combating insect pests of rice and of other cereals such as maize.

 

In modern rice agriculture, BPH damage is controlled through breeding and the application of vast amounts of chemical pesticides1. Pesticides are not a sustainable approach, however, owing to high costs, harmful environmental effects and rapid development of resistant insects. Breeding programs have identified more than 20 genetic loci in cultivated or wild rice species that confer BPH resistance1. However, these Bph loci are usually only effective against specific BPH biotypes, and newly evolved BPH populations have rapidly overcome several Bph resistance loci deployed in the field..

 

Of the >20 identified Bph loci, only Bph14 and Bph26 have been cloned. Both of these loci encode coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat proteins3, 4, the main class of plant intracellular immune receptors5. Bph3 is a resistance locus that was first pinpointed genetically in the Sri Lankan rice indica cultivar Rathu Heenati. Notably, unlike most other Bph loci, including Bph14 and Bph26, Bph3 confers broad-spectrum resistance to many BPH biotypes as well as to the white back planthopper1, 2. The success of Bph3 as a resistance locus might be linked to the fact that it acts against BPH at an early stage of the feeding cycle, before the insect can deploy its arsenal of virulence proteins that circumvent plant defenses.

 

Despite the huge potential of Bph3 for rice agriculture, its molecular identity has been unknown. Liu et al.2 now identify Bph3 through map-based cloning in a cross between the resistant indica cultivar Rathu Heenati and the susceptible japonica cultivar 02428. Bph3 maps to a 79-kb genomic region that contains a cluster of three lectin receptor kinases, OsLecRK1–3 (ref. 2) (Fig. 1). The authors find that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes are associated with BPH resistance in different cultivated rice accessions. They also show that ectopic expression of the OsLecRK1–3 gene cluster in the susceptible japonica Kitaake cultivar confers BPH resistance.

 

See Liu et al. Nature Biotechnology http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v33/n3/full/nbt.3069.html


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Francis Martin, Christophe Jacquet
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

When Plants Get ... Radioactive?

When Plants Get ... Radioactive? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Some plants can take in toxic metals without harm. Others take it up a notch.
Mary Williams's insight:

Another comic on phytoremediation from Maki Naro

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Waarom bestuderen we planten?

Waarom bestuderen we planten? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Waarom bestuderen we planten?
"Why study plants?" is now available in Dutch! http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/TTPB1.xhtml.
Thanks to the Experimental Plant Science PhD student council for translating it! http://www.graduateschool-eps.info/…/phd-student-council-ma…
You can also download this free resource in Catalan, Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Swedish, thanks to many teams of volunteers. Good for talks at highschools, to the general public, or at Fascination of Plants Day events.Click here to edit the title

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Plant growth patterns changing on much of Earth’s surface

Plant growth patterns changing on much of Earth’s surface | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
More than half of Earth’s land surface has seen major changes in factors such as leaf-on date and how much vegetation grows in a season.


This is not surprising, but it is important evidence.
Here's the summary, "Plant growth patterns changing on much of Earth’s surface"
https://www.sciencenews.org/…/plant-growth-patterns-changin…
and here's a link to the article in Nature Climate Change
"Three decades of multi-dimensional change in global leaf phenology"
http://www.nature.com/…/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate2533.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Share your enthusiasm! Teaching Tools submission competition

Share your enthusiasm! Teaching Tools submission competition | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

For years we’ve been asking people how they define a great teacher. One trait that repeatedly comes up is “enthusiasm.” Nobody enthuses about plants better than plant scientists, so we’re offering you a chance to “share your enthusiasm”.


Have you got a passion for plant science? Do you have a favorite paper, experiment, topic, or method that you like to share with undergraduates? Have you found a clever way to engage students and stimulate their curiosity?


We are soliciting short pre-proposals for contributions to the Teaching Tools in Plant Biology feature of The Plant Cell. Tell us what you are excited about that you would like to develop into a Teaching Tools article. We will invite the authors of a selected few pre-proposals to submit complete articles for review. Upon acceptance they will be published as a Teaching Tools in Plant Biology feature in The Plant Cell and awarded a $500 stipend.


The three pre-proposal competition deadlines in 2015 are April 30th, August 31st and December 31st. You can find complete competition guidelines and the proposal submission form here (https://c.ymcdn.com/sites/aspb.site-ym.com/resource/resmgr/Publications/TTPBCompetition.pdf).


As Charlotte Bronte said, “True enthusiasm is a fine feeling whose flash I admire where-ever I see it,” so go ahead and share your enthusiasm!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

Phytomonas : Trypanosomatids Adapted to Plant Environments

Phytomonas : Trypanosomatids Adapted to Plant Environments | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

"Over 100 years after trypanosomatids were first discovered in plant tissues, Phytomonas parasites have now been isolated across the globe from members of 24 different plant families. Most identified species have not been associated with any plant pathology and to date only two species are definitively known to cause plant disease. These diseases (wilt of palm and coffee phloem necrosis) are problematic in areas of South America where they threaten the economies of developing countries."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Williams
Scoop.it!

The ‘perfect storm revisited’: food, energy and water security in the context of climate change - YouTube

"Streamed live on 26 Feb 2015

Some five years ago Sir John Beddington, Senior Adviser at the Oxford Martin School, raised the concept of 'The Perfect Storm' in which the issues of food, water and energy security needed to be addressed at the same time as mitigating and adapting to climate change. In this seminar he highlights changes that have occurred since then and the progress made and challenges that are currently faced."

Mary Williams's insight:

Here's the press release from the hosting institution, OxfoRD Martin School.

http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/news/2015_Beddington_seminar

more...
No comment yet.