Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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BBSRC - "How I discovered ash dieback (and what we’re doing about it)" - BBSRC

BBSRC - "How I discovered ash dieback (and what we’re doing about it)" - BBSRC | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
It was one of those bad things just waiting to happen. When the tree killer ash dieback disease was first found in the UK in February 2012 it became a major concern to anyone who recalled the devastation wrought by Dutch elm disease in Britain.
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Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Hooks and hot topics for university teachers and students
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What We’re Reading: January 20th

What We’re Reading: January 20th | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What We’re Reading: January 20th: drought, pathogens, membranes and databases, oh my! Fe, Cl and mitochondria too!

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What We’re Reading: January 13

What We’re Reading: January 13 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Weekly round up of new and interesting papers from across plant sciences. Featured this week: autophagosomes, fungal hitchhikers, WRKY gene networks, edge effects in forests, orphan legumes, coffee genetic diversity and more!

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The Long, Lonely Quest to Breed the Ultimate Avocado

The Long, Lonely Quest to Breed the Ultimate Avocado | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
The buttery, nutty Hass has lots going for it, but horticulturists and geneticists want to do better—and save avocados from a future of pests and drought.
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An Ingenious Experiment of Jungle Bats and Evolving Artificial Flowers

An Ingenious Experiment of Jungle Bats and Evolving Artificial Flowers | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Scientists solved a longstanding mystery about the sweetness of nectar that likely applies to humans too.
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The fungus-fighting secrets hiding in the sugar pine’s enormous megagenome

The fungus-fighting secrets hiding in the sugar pine’s enormous megagenome | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
a blog from the Genetics Society of America
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377: Dr. Winslow Briggs: Illuminating our Understanding of the Photoreceptor System Controlling Plant Growth Towards Light - People Behind the Science Podcast

377: Dr. Winslow Briggs: Illuminating our Understanding of the Photoreceptor System Controlling Plant Growth Towards Light - People Behind the Science Podcast | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Listen to the Episode Below (00:47:53) Download Listen in a New Window iTunes Stitcher SoundCloud Leave a Review Clammr It Subscribe via RSS Subscribe on Android Sign up to recieve bonus content about our guests and sneak peeks for a guest from the next week’s interviews! Listen Free in iTunes  Listen Free on Stitcher Radio …
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Top Ten 2016 Plant Science Today posts

Top Ten 2016 Plant Science Today posts | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The Plant Science Today blog is only a few years old and continues to gain readers. In 2016 more than 250 posts were shared, with contributions from many guest authors as well as ASPB staff. Here are the ten most widely read posts this year. Did you catch them all?

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The vanilla dilemma

The vanilla dilemma | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

With demand outpacing supply, what options are there for vanilla lovers? Which plan do you prefer, vanilla subtitute made by chemical synthesis, or that produced through the tools of synthetic biology to recreate the biosynthetic pathway in vivo?

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Best of 2016: Top Topics in Plant Physiology journal

Best of 2016: Top Topics in Plant Physiology journal | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We’ve highlighted some of the Plant Physiology papers that were widely shared, liked, blogged, retweeted and otherwise garnered high-levels of attention this year. Perhaps you can use some of that holiday-season quiet time to catch up on those you missed. Read more...

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IR8: The miracle rice which saved millions of lives - BBC News

IR8: The miracle rice which saved millions of lives - BBC News | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
It is 50 years since a newly-developed strain revolutionised rice farming.
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Intracellular innate immune surveillance devices in plants and animals

Intracellular innate immune surveillance devices in plants and animals | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Multicellular eukaryotes coevolve with microbial pathogens, which exert strong selective pressure on the immune systems of their hosts. Plants and animals use intracellular proteins of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) superfamily to detect many types of microbial pathogens. The NLR domain architecture likely evolved independently and convergently in each kingdom, and the molecular mechanisms of pathogen detection by plant and animal NLRs have long been considered to be distinct. However, microbial recognition mechanisms overlap, and it is now possible to discern important key trans-kingdom principles of NLR-dependent immune function. Here, we attempt to articulate these principles. We propose that the NLR architecture has evolved for pathogen-sensing in diverse organisms because of its utility as a tightly folded “hair trigger” device into which a virtually limitless number of microbial detection platforms can be integrated. Recent findings suggest means to rationally design novel recognition capabilities to counter disease.

Via Ryohei Thomas Nakano, Jim Alfano
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Construction of a male sterility system for hybrid rice breeding and seed production using a nuclear male sterility gene

Construction of a male sterility system for hybrid rice breeding and seed production using a nuclear male sterility gene | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

This is an interesting Open Access paper about the development of a male-sterility system for breeding hybrid rice. If you teach genetics, your students might have fun working out how the male sterility trait is maintaned - a clever system!

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Avocados Imperil Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Home in Mexico

Avocados Imperil Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Home in Mexico | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Spurred by rising demand for the fruit, farmers in the Mexican state that hosts the annual butterfly migration are replacing a vital forest habitat with orchards.
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Edward Buckler

Edward Buckler | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Edward S. Buckler, Research Geneticist, USDA-ARS and Adjunct Professor, Plant Breeding and Genetics at the Institute for Genomic Diversity, Cornell University, will receive the 2017 NAS Prize in Food and Agriculture Sciences, the first time this prize is being awarded.

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What We’re Reading: January 6th

What We’re Reading: January 6th | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Weekly roundup of new and interesting articles from the plant sciences. This week's featured papers span ppressoria, auxin, ash dieback, growth rings, nutrients, okra locus and more!

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Bring me sunshine in your spores | Susannah Lydon

Bring me sunshine in your spores | Susannah Lydon | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Ultraviolet radiation can have huge effects on our planet’s climate, but what has it done the past? The fossil record can tell us about UV through the study of pollen and spores
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Fossil leaves suggest global warming will be harder to fight than scientists thought

Fossil leaves suggest global warming will be harder to fight than scientists thought | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Relics warn that climate may be more sensitive to rising atmospheric CO2 than models predict
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Falcons, Drones, Data: A Winery Battles Climate Change

Falcons, Drones, Data: A Winery Battles Climate Change | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Jackson Family Wines of Sonoma, Calif., is among winemakers employing both high-tech and old-school techniques to adapt to hotter, drier conditions.
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What We’re Reading: Dec 30th

What We’re Reading: Dec 30th | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

For the past three months, we (Mary Williams and Plantae Fellows) have been profiling selected papers of broad interest to the plant science community. You can see all of our posts here: What We’re Reading. Early in 2017 we’ll be moving this feature to the new, soon-to-be unveiled public pages on Plantae (watch this space!). When hosted on that platform, the summaries will be searchable by the Tags we have been appending to the end of each summary.

We hope you have been finding this new feature useful; drop us a line if you have suggestions for improvements. If you’d like to contribute a short paper summary please contact mwilliams@aspb.org. Finally, best wishes for a happy, healthy, and most importantly peaceful New Year!

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What We’re Reading: December 23

What We’re Reading: December 23 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
What We’re Reading: December 23.
Short, accessible summaries of articles of broad interest to plant scientists, with links to the papers for more in-depth reading.
Featuring biophysics of pollinator attraction and seed germination, and much more
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Best of 2016: Top Topics in The Plant Cell journal

Best of 2016: Top Topics in The Plant Cell journal | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We’ve highlighted some of the Plant Cell papers that were widely shared, liked, blogged, retweeted and otherwise garnered high-levels of attention this year. Perhaps you can use some holiday-season quiet time to catch up on those you missed.

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(From July) Why the promise of a plant that glows has left backers in the dark

(From July) Why the promise of a plant that glows has left backers in the dark | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Do-it-yourself biologists who hit the crowdfunding jackpot have learned that genetic engineering isn’t so easy after all.
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On Tiny Island Farms, Biodiversity Is a Way of Life

On Tiny Island Farms, Biodiversity Is a Way of Life | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Jamaican farmers grow an average of 87 useful plants on their tiny plots, including a variety of foods, timber, and medicinal herbs.
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Dying two deaths — programmed cell death regulation in development and disease

Dying two deaths — programmed cell death regulation in development and disease | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Highlights



Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and disease.


Developmental PCD (dPCD) is prepared during the cellular differentiation of specific cell types.


Pathogen triggered PCD (pPCD) receptors recognize pathogen signals and activate PCD.


dPCD and pPCD regulation show some similarities, but also differ in many aspects.


Whether a common core machinery for plant PCD control exists is still unclear.

Programmed cell death (PCD) is a fundamental cellular process that has adopted a plethora of vital functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, PCD processes are elicited as an inherent part of regular development in specific cell types or tissues, but can also be triggered by biotic and abiotic stresses. Although over the last years we have seen progress in our understanding of the molecular regulation of different plant PCD processes, it is still unclear whether a common core machinery exists that controls cell death in development and disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field, comparing some aspects of the molecular regulation controlling developmental and pathogen-triggered PCD in plants.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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