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Flag Food

Flag Food | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Mark Slusher's insight:

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:09 AM

I love it... I am seeing an extra credit project with this... feed the teacher and make it educational too!

dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
Planet Earth Phenomenon
GPS/GIS, GoogleEarth, Simple Geography, and Earth Science concepts.
Curated by Mark Slusher
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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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Climate Change Storytelling: How Stories Can Help Turn the Tide On Any Complex Issue

Climate Change Storytelling: How Stories Can Help Turn the Tide On Any Complex Issue | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of discussion on climate change; it seems almost pervasive these days. The media report extreme weather events, animal extinction (think polar bears floating off to sea), health problems, and the political push and pull around the issue.  The problem is also prevalent in popular culture, with magazines running special issues, movies showing the end of our days, and video games that presenting post-apocalyptic scenarios.  Yet, we have very little consensus about how to deal with it. Robert Redford recently wrote a blog post calling for more storytelling on “complicated, politically charged issues like our environment and the need for swift action to combat climate change.”

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 12, 2014 2:59 PM

If you are committed to positive change happening on any complicated social issue, stories can help. And here's a terrific post by Roxanne Bauer discussing how storytelling makes a difference -- and its limitations, too.


Years ago I coached the top global expert on grizzly bears. Her lament: "We scientists keep doing the same thing over and over again (sharing data and danger) and expecting different results. I think storytelling may be the answer to bring about needed change."


She is so right. Her stories about the importance of, decline of, and what to do about supporting grizzly bears got standing ovations.


This is not so much an article about "Yes we can". It's understanding more about how stories work on making complex issues less intimidating, and how they overcome the limitations of technical language where eyes glaze over.


I particularly like Bauer's statement that stories can/should address the underlying consequences of an issue that hit home for people. She's got good examples to make her point.


To change the world, get your storytelling game on. Let's remember what doesn't work/hasn't worked and share stories to experience different results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 15, 2014 8:41 AM

Glad to see influential people who know how to tell a story get involved.

Joao Leao's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:43 AM

Climate change is NOT a Story!

 

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

Via Seth Dixon
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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep
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If the U.S. Were Graded Using the UN's Index For African Development, Here's What We'd See

If the U.S. Were Graded Using the UN's Index For African Development, Here's What We'd See | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates.
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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps

Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

"One of the people I regard most highly here at Esri has created an online atlas of Mexico.  The maps can be accessed in many different ways, such as an ArcGIS Online presentation with a description here, as an iPad iBook, but I think most importantly, as a series of story maps.  Each of these separate story maps contains 1 to 6 thematically related maps on the following topics:

Explore Mexico (Crime vs. Tourism)Mexico’s Natural WondersMexico’s Historical MonumentsGeography of Mexico – Did You Know?Indigenous People of MexicoCartograms of Mexico

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 13, 2014 3:14 PM

This site is neat.  The ability to use interactive maps to explore this country is very informative.  I recommend this site to anyone interesting in learning more about Mexico!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:17 AM

These maps all come together in a somewhat story-like sense. They are thematically related and can be separated to be able to look at each map individually. I like how there are multiple ways to access the maps.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:05 PM

An interactive map system like this is great, it has different topics to look at that will continuously amaze you on the information it holds. After looking at such a map like this will all the different options offered, I was able to learn things about Mexico that I had never known before. It is maps like this that really make geography fun and help us to understand what each region is all about. 

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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

"The Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond has created an enhanced version of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which was published in 1932. The atlas, which took dozens of researchers to assemble, used maps to illustrate a variety of political, demographic and economic concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:37 AM

Muy buen material!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 2014 11:24 AM

Atlas de la geografíia histórica de Estados Unidos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:33 PM

Okay, this is actually pretty cool. The atlas is huge and has tons of information within it. No wonder there were tons of helping hands who created this map(s) of insightful looks at demographic and political debate.

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On How to Read a (Good) Map - NASA Earth Science Week

On How to Read a (Good) Map - NASA Earth Science Week | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is.
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Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898

Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898 | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
The silhouettes of Earth's tectonic boundaries stand out in bright color.
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Climate change occurring 10 times faster than at any time in past 65 million years

Climate change occurring 10 times faster than at any time in past 65 million years | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
The planet is undergoing one of the largest changes in climate since the dinosaurs went extinct. But what might be even more troubling for humans, plants and animals is the speed of the change.
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Teaching with Google Earth- Awesome Tips and Tutorials ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Teaching with Google Earth- Awesome Tips and Tutorials ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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James Horwath's curator insight, July 26, 2013 6:34 PM

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Dafnord 's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:28 PM

Vantaalaiskollega kertoi koulunsa uudesta hienosta valokuidusta. Opetukseen on kaistaa tarjolla kuitenkin vain 2 Mb. Niinpä opettaja pitäessään tuntia GoogleEarthillä luo nettiyhteyden 3G älypuhelimellaan ja käyttää sitä. Että näin meillä Vantaalla. Säästetään datamäärissä ymmärtämättä että se mikä säästetään on pois lasten tulevaisuuden mahdollisuuksista. Valokuituun pitäisi päinvastoin liittää teollisuusstandardien mukainen langaton verkko jokaiseen oppimistilaan. Mitä järkeä on vetää valokuitua kouluun, jos sitä ei aiota tosiasiassa käyttää? Sama kuin rakentaisi moottoritien vain pyöräilytieksi.

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Simulation of Yellowstone Supervolcano eruption shows that blast would blanket whole U.S. in ash

Simulation of Yellowstone Supervolcano eruption shows that blast would blanket whole U.S. in ash | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

A new simulation illustrates the explosiveness of the volcano that lurks beneath Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

 

Around 640,000 years ago, the volcano blew its top and coated North America with roughly 1,000 cubic kilometers of ash, enough to fill Lake Erie twice over. A simulation of the eruption described August 27, 2014 in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems reveals that a similar outburst today would bury Billings, Mont., in more than a meter (about 40 inches) of volcanic glass shards and pulverized rock. Even New York and Atlanta would receive dustings several millimeters thick as winds whisked ash through the darkened atmosphere for days.

 

Researchers used simulation software called Ash3d that forecasts ash fall by applying global wind patterns to data from historical eruptions. Ash3d churns out results several times faster than previous simulators and is the first program to incorporate the physics of how ash particles clump within a cloud.

 

While geologists say Yellowstone will likely never erupt again, scientists around the world use Ash3d daily to predict the potential fallout from restless volcanoes — including Bárðarbunga, the Icelandic volcano that began erupting in late August.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:11 PM

Nice example of developing and using a model to predict future events based on current evidence.

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...
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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


Via Seth Dixon
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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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APHG Reader Suggestions

APHG Reader Suggestions | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 8, 2014 10:26 AM

I've had a wonderful week in Cincinnati at the APHG reading.  Teachers love to share ideas and resources when we gather together and we've compiled 4 pages of links, books, websites and other resources that APHG readers have suggested for classroom use.  Here is a 4-page compilation of APHG reader-suggested resources. Additionally, here is the final newsletter (earlier editions of the newsletter archived here).   I'll miss the friendliness and professional expertise of this fantastic network of geography educators.  See you next year!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Teacher Info

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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 2014 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Google Lat Long: Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch

Google Lat Long: Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Via Seth Dixon
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don't know the countrie...
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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


Via Seth Dixon
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viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

not only has poverty increased drastically in the south and spread west but also states that where considered to be low percentage of poverty have increased to poverty. many states up north are now in danger. the economy hasn't increased at all in the last twenty plus years and it should be interesting to see what happens in the future, hopefully the south doesn't get too far under the poverty line to the point where it can't be brought back.

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What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like? | Planet Earth Phenomenon | Scoop.it
Mark Slusher's insight:

Seth Dixon, Professor at Rhode Island, provides some insight.

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