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Plagiarism in advertising happens very often, for example...
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A site dedicated to hunt similar advertising ideas from around the world

A site dedicated to hunt similar advertising ideas from around the world | Plagiarism in advertising happens very often, for example... | Scoop.it

THE ORIGINAL VS LESS ORIGINAL

Shameless copycats or unfortunate coincidences? You decide!

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MLA Citing Electronic Works

MLA Citing Electronic Works | Plagiarism in advertising happens very often, for example... | Scoop.it

If some of the information is unavailable or cannot be located, include whatever is available. Sometimes a website’s sub-pages will provide more details, though make sure any information listed there is not for just that page. For example, do not list Karl Stolley as the editor for the entire OWL at Purdue website because he is just the editor for the site’s “Fair Use Policy” page.

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Plagtracker.com | Plagiarism checking service for you. | Facebook

Plagtracker.com | Plagiarism checking service for you. | Facebook | Plagiarism in advertising happens very often, for example... | Scoop.it

Citing Articles
One advantage to finding sources in article databases is that all of the information you need to cite the source is clear and easy to find. For example, for every article in Lexis-Nexis you'll find the author's name, newspaper name, and article title in the same place.

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Editorial Photographers UK | Visual plagiarism: when does inspiration become imitation ? (page 1 of 2)

Editorial Photographers UK | Visual plagiarism: when does inspiration become imitation ? (page 1 of 2) | Plagiarism in advertising happens very often, for example... | Scoop.it

When photographer Ian Sanderson first saw an advertising campaign for the French Tourist Federation FNOTSI, he was convinced that the photograph featured was one that he had taken a decade previously for Athena, and which was available to use through Getty Images.

It was only when he looked closer at the image that he realised that it was not his work but just a very similar photograph: and both he and Getty believed that the similarities were down to outright copying of the original, rather than just chance.

While the advertising campaign was cut short when Getty contacted FNOTSI, both they and their advertising agency Prisme denyed any infringement, claiming that their photographer Laurence Frappa was working from a designers sketch, rather than Sanderson’s photograph, and any likeness was coincidental.

A Paris court initially ruled in favour of FNOTSI and Prisme in 2006, stating that Frappa’s photograph was a new expression of the underlying idea of Sanderson’s photograph, rather than a copying of the photograph itself. An appeal court overturned this decision in November 2007, ruling in favour of Getty.

FNOTSI and Prisme are estimated to have saved around €6,000 in commissioning their own photographer rather than licensing Sanderson’s photograph from Getty. However, it is estimated that this decision subsequently cost them over €100,000 in legal fees, damages, and the scrapping of the original campaign.


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