Places of Historical Significance in the Manly Area: ideas for teaching Stage 1 HSIE Change and Continuity
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Manly Council - Local Studies Collection

Naomi Shepherd's insight:

This site has a wealth of information on the history and geography of the local area. It includes local directories, accounts of the First Fleet and other explorations, Aboriginal census information, fact sheets on the capture of Arabanoo and the spearing of Captain Phillip, biographical dictionaries and fact sheets on local historical figures, history on streets and buildings, and information on local places and historical walks. The fact sheets on heritage walks contain concise information and maps for locations such as Dalley’s castle, the Anzac War Memorial and plaques containing information on the Aboriginal Cannalgal and Kayimai People from the area. The information on this site is suitable to enable teachers to deliver Stage 1 content for Change and Continuity, and many of the historical monuments and associated information would be engaging for Stage 1, such as the Aboriginal heritage plague at East Esplanade Reserve, the Wishing Well at South Steyne, and The Stone Kangaroo, carved circa 1856, Manly’s oldest European artefact still in existence. This site is also an excellent resource to use to address other aspects of the Stage 1 HSIE outcomes, and is suitable to address outcomes for different Stages as well. The Local studies staff at Manly Library are available to assist with specific inquiries and identification of appropriate resources. 

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- Karens Historic Walks

- Karens Historic Walks | Places of Historical Significance in the Manly Area: ideas for teaching Stage 1 HSIE Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
history, ghost tour, walk, tour, manly, beach, first fleet, ferry, port jackson, convict, school, education, things to do in Sydney
Naomi Shepherd's insight:

Karen’s walking tours offer a historical perspective of Manly that covers both Aboriginal history and early British colonisation. Her tours appeal to the senses and provide experiential learning, as she encourages students to explore the natural environment in order to gain a deeper understanding of the past. The students also get the chance to speak with Captain Phillip and others dressed in costume from the period. Her method of delivery integrates experience and concepts, providing a concrete experience for students to observe and reflect upon. She highlights both the changes and continuities in the area, and the significance of key historical figures, events and places. She covers local monuments and important sites in Manly, and is extremely knowledgeable on the detail of the area’s history. She is experienced and equipped in adapting the tours to suit different Stages and Syllabus outcomes, and she is flexible in altering the nature and content of the tours to suit different teacher and student goals. This interactive tour is low cost, and only a short five minute bus ride from Balgowlah Heights Public School, and other schools in the local area, making it an accessible excursion for Stage 1 students to explore a fun and perhaps more tangible presentation of early European settlement. This is an area that most local children would use on a daily, weekly or monthly basis to spend their free time playing, swimming, shopping and doing other activities, and this is a creative and engaging experience to enable them to learn the local, regional and national historical significance of the area.

 

Kolb, D. (1984). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs (US): Prentice Hall.

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Territorial Evolution of the British Empire - YouTube

Series of maps depicting the rise and fall of the British Empire from 1492 to the present day. Credits: Maps by Gerrynobody at the Wikipedia project, in the ...
Naomi Shepherd's insight:

This clip shows the evolution of British colonisation over time from 1492 up to the present day. Showing this to Stage 1 students after exploring the history of colonisation in the local area could give a global perspective by showing other parts of the world that experienced a similar colonial history. Perhaps following on from this, it would be interesting for students to explore what some of these places are like today through photos, picture books or other You Tube clips, and to explore the similarities and differences between these places and Manly, or Australia, since colonisation. Teachers could even chose to show Indigenous perspectives from other colonised places here too. Another task idea might be to print world maps and get students to colour or label the current countries or previously colonised areas. There are many interesting maps of British colonisation, however many are shown in specific years and do not give a broader picture of all of the places colonised by the British over time. These provide a constrained and disjointed representation of the impact and of British settlement, whereas this moving map provides a more fluid representation and therefore is a more flexible resource.

 

Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60-70.

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Arabanoo lookout at Dobroyd Head | NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Arabanoo lookout at Dobroyd Head | NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service | Places of Historical Significance in the Manly Area: ideas for teaching Stage 1 HSIE Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Arabanoo lookout at Dobroyd Head is named in honour of Arabanoo, the first Aboriginal man to live among European settlers. It's a great spot for whale watching, offering views over North and South Head and the Pacific Ocean.
Naomi Shepherd's insight:

Arabanoo lookout at Dobroyd Head is an ideal location for students to visit to explore the natural environment and to gain different historical perspectives of the area. The lookout is named after Arabanoo, the first Aboriginal man to be captured by the British in December 1788 by order of Captain Arthur Phillip. The place where Arabanoo was captured at Manly Cove can be seen from the lookout, and there are signs containing historical information at the lookout and in the surrounding area. Contact with other Kayimai (sometimes referred to as Gayamaygal) and Cannalgal People was made in this area, and more were captured here in the years following. In the bush at Dobroyd Head, there are Aboriginal rock carvings, and more can be found at Grotto point, a short bush walk from Dobroyd Head. The thick bushland extends down to the Harbour’s edge, and the Sydney Headlands, Harbour and the ocean are visible from this location. The spot is only a short ten minute walk from Balgowlah Heights Public School, (and a few minutes drive from other local schools) and is a place where the school frequently visits for sport and other activities on the adjacent oval. Visiting the site delivers an Indigenous perspective on the area’s history in a place that has continued to be a haven of native bushland, and that has changed over time into a place that is used frequently by the current community and schools for sports, leisure, and for local and national celebrations. An excursion here would enable students to connect stories from the past to their familiar surroundings. This location can also be used to achieve cross-curriculum objectives and to develop knowledge and skills related to other areas of the curriculum.

 

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., Boon,D. (2012). The Permeable Classroom. In Place and Time: Explorations in teaching geography and history (pp. 245-278). Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 

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Manly Council - Art Gallery & Museum

Manly Council - Art Gallery & Museum | Places of Historical Significance in the Manly Area: ideas for teaching Stage 1 HSIE Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Naomi Shepherd's insight:

The Manly Art Gallery and Museum is located 350 metres from Manly wharf, and is an excellent place to visit to explore places in the local area associated with historical events. The Gallery and the site itself have their own history, and it was the first metropolitan regional gallery in Australia. It now houses 130 paintings by Antonio Dattilo-Rubbo, the founder of the gallery, and his works show the changes and similarities of people and places in the local area throughout the 20th Century. Many of the works depict the early Manly beach culture and local events held in the heart of Manly. Many of the landscapes and events remain very similar, from the early 1900s to the present, while the appearance of the people depicted in Dattilo-Rubbo’s works are quite different. Viewing his works could provide Stage 1 students with a good understanding of the contrasts and similarities between the past and the present that exist in their local area. The works are displayed in a room that overlooks the beach depicted in many of the artworks, making this an excellent experience for students to make connections between the past and the present. The gallery also houses local, national and international exhibitions, including exhibitions on the history of the local Kayimai and Cannalgal People.

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