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Exploring the digital imaging chain from sensors to brains
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Scientists reconstruct speech through soundproof glass by watching a bag of potato chips

Scientists reconstruct speech through soundproof glass by watching a bag of potato chips | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it

Your bag of potato chips can hear what you're saying. Now, researchers from MIT are trying to figure out a way to make that bag of chips tell them everything that you said — and apparently they have a method that works. By pointing a video camera at the bag while audio is playing or someone is speaking, researchers can detect tiny vibrations in it that are caused by the sound. When later playing back that recording, MIT says that it has figured out a way to read those vibrations and translate them back into music, speech, or seemingly any other sound.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Throw your bag of chips before engaging in a confidential conversation. And avoid any line of sight.

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MIT's Halide programming language can dramatically speed imaging processing

MIT's Halide programming language can dramatically speed imaging processing | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it

A new programming language for image-processing algorithms yields code that runs much faster, reports the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — and this could lead to much better in-camera performance in dedicated devices and smart phones.

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Low-cost 'nano-camera' developed that can operate at the speed of light | NDTV Gadgets

Low-cost 'nano-camera' developed that can operate at the speed of light | NDTV Gadgets | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it

Researchers at MIT Media Lab have developed a $500 "nano-camera" that can operate at the speed of light. According to the researchers, potential applications of the 3D camera include collision-avoidance, gesture-recognition, medical imaging, motion-tracking and interactive gaming.


The team which developed the inexpensive "nano-camera" comprises Ramesh Raskar, Achuta Kadambi, Refael Whyte, Ayush Bhandari, and Christopher Barsi at MIT, and Adrian Dorrington and Lee Streeter from the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

 

The nano-camera uses the "Time of Flight" method to measure scenes, a method also used by Microsoft for its new Kinect sensor that ships with the Xbox One. With this Time of Flight, the location of objects is calculated by how long it takes for transmitted light to reflect off a surface and return to the sensor. However, unlike conventional Time of Flight cameras, the new camera will produce accurate measurements even in fog or rain, and can also correctly locate translucent objects.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Meet the nano-camera, the $500 little sister of 2011 $500.000 femto-camera...

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