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Unleash your camera’s inner Hulk with a free hack to the firmware

Unleash your camera’s inner Hulk with a free hack to the firmware | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it

In 2012, two Canadian teenagers, Mathew Ho and Asad Muhammad, successfully sent a Lego mini figure up into space using a weather balloon as the vehicle. To document the event from liftoff to crash-land, they rigged a basic Canon point-and-shoot camera to continuously snap photos. While it sounds like a complicated science project, it’s actually something many have successfully accomplished (Ho and Muhammad just made theirs unique by sending the little Lego guy with it and, oh, they’re teens). And hacking the camera might actually be the easy part, thanks to an open-source firmware update.

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Like CHDK, Magic Lantern is open-source software for Canon DSLRS, with an emphasis on enhancing video production (Magic Lantern’s creators don’t like to refer to it as a hack but a separate program that complements the camera’s software, but you get the idea). The supported DSLRs are the ones that can handle video capture, like the EOS 5D Mark II, 60D, Rebel T1i, etc., with future support for the 7D, 5D Mark III, and more. Essentially, it gives these DSLRs many of the similar advanced features that are found in more expensive video cameras.

 

But unlike CHDK, Magic Lantern is geared more toward advanced users, in particular those who use Canon DSLRs to create movies (although later updates have added features that benefit photographers too). Magic Lantern was originally created to add audio controls to the EOS 5D Mark II, which Canon didn’t provide. Over time, Magic Lantern evolved, adding a ton of extra features. If you own one of the supported cameras and you dabble a bit with video, however, it doesn’t hurt to try out Magic Lantern’s features, as it’s not difficult to install and it runs independently on the memory card.

 

Once set up, pushing the camera’s Delete button will bring up the extra menus. Magic Lantern’s benefits are many, but some of the notable ones include manual fine-tuning of audio; tools for exposure and focusing; HDR video; bracketing; zebra patterns; and an intervalometer for shooting time lapse and astrophotography. As we’ve mentioned, Magic Lantern is best for more advanced users who’ve gotten to know the ins and outs of their Canon DSLR.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

"Of course we can do it : it is just software..." - The story of these hacked firmwares is almost as interesting as what they can deliver.

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Notre-Dame de Paris turns 850

Notre-Dame de Paris turns 850 | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it
Eight centuries and a half after the beginning of Notre-Dame’s erection, a scientific symposium will be held from December 12th 2012 to December 15th 2012 at the Collège des Bernardins. The lectures will be given by around 30 researchers with different specializations: religious, social, liturgical, artistic, literary and institutional. The cardinal archbishop of Paris, André Vingt-Trois will open this conference at 2:00PM on Wednesday December 12th 2012 before presiding the opening of the 850th anniversary of Notre-Dame de Paris.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Picture shot from the Pantheon 22 years ago - Canon EOS10

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Canon debuts second-gen “Cinema” 4K cameras

Canon debuts second-gen “Cinema” 4K cameras | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it
Two new Canon cameras capture “4K” video — 4096 by 2160 resolution motion imagery that is “emerging as the new standard for advanced effects and post-production in Hollywood,” Canon says. “It is particularly important for big-budget motion pictures that include scenes compositing live-action cinematography with high-resolution computer-generated imagery.”

The EOS-1D C is an SLR camera providing video recording at 4K, as well as Full HD video, and 18-megapixel stills, using a full-frame 24 by 36mm CMOS sensor. 4K video is captured by an approximately APS-H-sized portion of the full image sensor.

The camera records 8-bit 4:2:2 Motion JPEG 4K video to dual CF cards. It has an expanded sensitivity range up to ISO 25600 “for exceptional motion-imaging results with reduced noise even in low-light settings.”

Also, Canon says its Log Gamma enables high-quality video “with rich gradation expression, making possible the type of impressive image quality required in motion pictures by maximizing both highlight and shadow detail retention while also providing a high level of color-grading freedom.”
The 1D C has a headphone jack for audio monitoring, and will be available this year for $15,000.
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Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Sony FS100, and Canon 5D Mark II Face off in a Hair and Skin Tone Test. By Joe Marine (03:14)

Posted by Joe Marine on January 17, 2013 • 

 

"Color is just about the most subjective aspect of any visual creation. Everyone sees color a little differently, so it’s no surprise that we talk endlessly about color science and about which cameras we prefer. Certain looks are too much for some people, and others are not enough. Blackmagic spent a great deal of time developing their color science with Australian Director of Photography John Brawley, and I think working with an actual shooter in developing their camera has made a significant difference in the visuals of the final product. Adam Roberts got a hold of the BMCC and performed a thorough test to compare the camera’s skin tones to that of the FS100 and the Mark II. Click through to check it out."

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Read more on NoFilmSchool.com


Via Thierry Saint-Paul, Gary Pageau
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Gary Pageau's curator insight, February 5, 2013 9:13 PM

color tests on some high-end cinema cams...

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A Peek Inside the Canon EOS 6D

A Peek Inside the Canon EOS 6D | pixels and pictures | Scoop.it

Where the other Canon cameras tend to come apart in modules (you can take off the back, or take off the front, etc.) the 6D was a bit more interconnected. To get the back off required removing the sides and a bit of the bottom for example. A bit of a pain for the exploring types, but I would imagine it also gives more structural support.

 

The body is basically plastic, but like most modern plastics it’s thick and solid. Never a thought that a screw was going to strip out during disassembly. Anyway, after a bit the back was off, and looks, from the inside, pretty similar to all the other Canon backs.

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