PISA 2012 scores
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Sorry, Michelle Rhee, But Our Obsession With Testing Kids is All About Money | AlterNet.org

Sorry, Michelle Rhee, But Our Obsession With Testing Kids is All About Money | AlterNet.org | PISA 2012 scores | Scoop.it

When President George W. Bush asked the American people, back in 2000, “Is our children learning?” left-leaning people everywhere got a big hoot out of it. Little did they know that the joke was on them.

 

The question not only revealed the inability of our national leaders to manage something as basic as English grammar. It reflected the incoherent means to which American education policy, with the support of Democrats and Republicans alike, would ultimately go about attempting to assess the impact of the country’s entire schooling enterprise.

 

Beginning with No Child Left Behind in 2001, an elaborate scheme to answer the question, “Is our children learning,” rolled out wave after wave of various assessments across every state in the country.

 

Results from national diagnostic tests, such as the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), which had previously never made much of a splash outside of academic circles, suddenly became throat-clutching events anticipated with days of media buildup.

 

Results from obscure international assessments – Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) – suddenly became crucially important “data” for determining the nation’s potential prosperity.

 

The results of all these exams have now become fodder for nearly every politician and government official to make grandiose claims that their campaign or their administration is “for the kids.”

 

Economists use the test results to build elaborate spreadsheets to justify all sorts of pronouncements about “what works” in education. And a parade of Very Serious People in news shows and symposiums obsess over pinhead arguments based on testing “output.”

 

Are all these assessments useless? Of course not. As a diagnostic tool, each may or may not reveal something worthwhile.

 

As University of Virginia professor Daniel Willingham recently observed, “Just as body temperature is a reliable, partial indicator of certain types of disease, a test score is a reliable, partial indicator of certain types of school outcomes.”

 

But that’s not how the assessment results are being talked about in the media or how they’re being used to leverage policy and change.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Tony Palmeri's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:11 AM

I chose this article because seeing the name "Michelle Rhee" was a blast from the past. I recall much of the controversy that surrounded her tenure in superintendency. Testing achievement has become the reality in education. Articles such as this continue to scold the current state of affairs, but I really don't see standardized tests going away anytime soon. However, I believe that we sometimes put too much stock into data, and the way testing achievement is utilized is often perplexing. For example the idea of "focus schools" in Michigan which earmarked schools with the greatest achievement gaps. Is this a consequence of ineffective instruction, or rather does it point to schools that are diverse? Is having a homogeneous population of students valued? I agree with the author, testing is a valuable diagnostic measure, but putting too much stock into test scores is reckless. 

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Pisa 2012 results: which country does best at reading, maths and science?

Pisa 2012 results: which country does best at reading, maths and science? | PISA 2012 scores | Scoop.it
How do countries compare for reading, maths and science performance? The latest Pisa results from the OECD show which countries are making the biggest improvements and which could do better
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Asian Nations Dominate International Test - ABC News

Asian Nations Dominate International Test - ABC News | PISA 2012 scores | Scoop.it
TakePart Asian Nations Dominate International Test ABC News About half a million students in 65 nations and educational systems took part in the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA, which is coordinated by the Paris-based...
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