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New Anti-Piracy System to Hit U.S. Internet Users on Monday

New Anti-Piracy System to Hit U.S. Internet Users on Monday | Piracy and the Music Industry | Scoop.it
Starting Monday, most U.S. Internet users will be subject to a new anti-piracy system that could slow their Internet speeds to a crawl.

 

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand — it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses.


Via Gust MEES
Jake Christian's insight:

With these offenses, it could serverely damage an online industry because of a select few individuals because the industries aren't making as much money. I personally think that this will backfire, like every other, as I like to call it, "chasing ghosts" operation the Government has taken on. I'd say whenever the Government declares war on an aspect of economics, it will fail. The Government will hurt consumers because of someone doing perceptively unlawful acts, while there could be legislation out there that could not affect innocent internet users with people who have engaged in Online Piracy, I have yet to see it and every piece of legislation has proven to be behind the ball and easily able to get around for people who choose not to abide by these laws.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:39 PM

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand —


===> it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses. <===


Gust MEES's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:41 PM

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand —

 

===> it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses. <===

  
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Rescooped by Jake Christian from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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New Anti-Piracy System to Hit U.S. Internet Users on Monday

New Anti-Piracy System to Hit U.S. Internet Users on Monday | Piracy and the Music Industry | Scoop.it
Starting Monday, most U.S. Internet users will be subject to a new anti-piracy system that could slow their Internet speeds to a crawl.

 

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand — it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses.


Via Gust MEES
Jake Christian's insight:

With these offenses, it could serverely damage an online industry because of a select few individuals because the industries aren't making as much money. I personally think that this will backfire, like every other, as I like to call it, "chasing ghosts" operation the Government has taken on. I'd say whenever the Government declares war on an aspect of economics, it will fail. The Government will hurt consumers because of someone doing perceptively unlawful acts, while there could be legislation out there that could not affect innocent internet users with people who have engaged in Online Piracy, I have yet to see it and every piece of legislation has proven to be behind the ball and easily able to get around for people who choose not to abide by these laws.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:39 PM

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand —


===> it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses. <===


Gust MEES's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:41 PM

The CAS, designed as an "educational" service to combat casual piracy in the U.S., has been criticized as designed purely for corporate interests, at the expense of the average Internet user. While it doesn't require ISPs to cut off Internet access to repeat pirates — as is the case in France and New Zealand —

 

===> it will issue escalating punishments to suspected pirates, severely reducing their connection speeds after five or six offenses. <===

  
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THE SAME SONG AND DANCE

F.B.T. PRODUCTIONS, LLC v. AFTERMATH RECORDS AND THE ROLE OF LICENSES IN THE DIGITAL AGE OF COPYRIGHT LAW - Villanova Law Review

Jake Christian's insight:

A J.D. Candidate paper going into the new bounds of how despite rulings in court, it did not curb the Internet Piracy issue that arose to A&M Records v. Napster

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Jake Christian's comment, May 13, 2013 11:39 AM
It talks about how the current laws do not deter internet piracy, and despite the measures declared in Court, it has not gone away. I would say the only way to truly shut down the problem, is to kill off the file hosting websites, however they serve a purpose aside from Music Piracy, so you have to draw the line, do you cut off people's businesses because the users use it for something you have no control over, or should these companies have a moderation on what gets hosted on its servers?
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Music piracy surprisingly good for business, study claims — RT News

Music piracy surprisingly good for business, study claims — RT News | Piracy and the Music Industry | Scoop.it
Downloading music illegally does not harm the music industry – in some cases it even helps it – according to a new study by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre.
Jake Christian's insight:

Showing Internet Piracy might actually be a good thing for the music industry because the consumers would otherwise not be exposed to the music they are downloading if it had not been for the option of illegal downloading. As stated in the article “taken at face value, our findings indicate that digital music piracy does not displace legal music purchases in digital format. This means that although there is trespassing of private property rights, there is unlikely to be much harm done on digital music revenues”.

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Jake Christian's comment, May 13, 2013 11:37 AM
While the article makes valid points about how people may not buy the album they stole initially so it makes it okay, there is the issue that is brought up to finite goods in how if somebody was not going to buy the couch at Macy's in the first place, does it make it okay to steal it anyways? That is a fallacy that needs to be accounted for in the debate.
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Internet piracy rehab: The latest push to curb illegal downloads | Marketplace.org

Internet piracy rehab: The latest push to curb illegal downloads | Marketplace.org | Piracy and the Music Industry | Scoop.it

Downloading stuff illegally online? Say hello to Internet piracy rehab. Instead of 12 steps, users get six warnings. That's part of a program that begins this week dubbed "Six Strikes". Under Six Strikes, Internet Service Providers send out warnings to users suspected of pirating online content.

 

Some of the participating ISP's include Comcast, Time Warner and AT&T. Jill Lesser, executive director for the Center for Copyright Information, the group leading the program, says a lot of those who share illegal content don't realize it's wrong.

 

"We are hopeful that the vast majority of people engaging in this behavior will change their behavior when they're informed in a way that's useful," she says.

So part of the new copyright alert system includes tips like how to secure your wireless connection and where to find legal downloads. If users keep pirating content online, ISP's can slow their Internet connection dramatically. Or users might have to watch a five-minute video on copyright infringement.

 

Benjamin Lennett, policy director for the Open Technology Institute, warns that content owners can ultimately use the program to cut off users' Internet connections.

 

"There's no cost for the content industry to submit as many requests to ISP's as they want," he says. "And this will all happen with very little transparency for the public."

 

Lennett says the new program offers no checks and balances for the content industry, so even if it seems weak on the surface, the copyright program can easily spiral out of control against users.

 

Click headline to read more or listen to the radio segment--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jake Christian's insight:

I think while personally wrong is a subjective term and not a concrete idea, the author makes points that people may not realize its wrong. There is a fallacy in this in terms of how the Legal System in the US works, although saying that, it does not mean I agree or disagree with how they approach it. In the US it does not matter if you percieve to be right in a situation, it has to do with what in fact occurred. I would say that this would kill off ISPs who do this, or severely curb them from new generations who are used to having a free internet where you do not feel as though you are being watched by your ISP to make sure you are not doing anything wrong. While in theory everybody would be okay with this, reality and theory are sometimes parallels and not a convergence.

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The Music Industry on (the) Line? Surviving Music Piracy in a Digital Era.

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Talking about the Music Industry having to innovate in order to deal with the Digital Age.

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Jake Christian's comment, May 13, 2013 11:59 AM
I think the Music Industry could use a lot of innovation and the increasing issue of Piracy could be the catalyst. It causes the Music Industry to evaluate ridiculous, unsustainable policies that were afflicting the Music Industry that the Internet Piracy problem has brought to light.