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Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: Deadly piglet virus spreads to nearly 200 U.S. farm sites

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: Deadly piglet virus spreads to nearly 200 U.S. farm sites | Livestock | Scoop.it
A swine virus deadly to young pigs, and never before seen in North America, has spiked to 199 sites in 13 states - nearly double the number of farms and other locations from earlier this month.

 

Iowa, the largest U.S. hog producer, has the most sites testing positive for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: 102 sites, as of June 10. The state raises on average 30 million hogs each year, according to the Iowa Pork Producers Association.

PEDV, most often fatal to very young pigs, causes diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration. It also sickens older hogs, though their survival rate tends to be high. The total number of pig deaths from the outbreak since the first cases were confirmed May 17 is not known.

Researchers at veterinarian diagnostic labs, who are testing samples as part of a broad investigation into the outbreak, have seen a substantial increase in positive cases since early June, when data on the PEDV outbreak showed it at some 103 sites nationwide.

The data was compiled and released last week by Iowa State University, University of Minnesota, Kansas State University and South Dakota State University.

The virus does not pose a health risk to humans or other animals and the meat from PEDV-infected pigs is safe for people to eat, according to federal officials and livestock economists.

But the virus, which is spreading rapidly across the United States, is proving harder to control than previously believed. In addition to Iowa, Oklahoma has 38 positive sites, Minnesota has 19 and Indiana has 10, according to the data.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Hurt: Falling feed prices to push hogs back to profitable - Farm and Ranch Guide

Hurt: Falling feed prices to push hogs back to profitable - Farm and Ranch Guide | Livestock | Scoop.it
Hurt: Falling feed prices to push hogs back to profitable Farm and Ranch Guide Hog production is returning to profitability as feed prices fall, and a reduction in slaughter numbers seems to show that producers are noticing, Purdue Extension...
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Deal to trim biggest payouts completes EU farm policy reform

European Union negotiators have agreed on a five per cent minimum reduction in subsidy payments above 150,000 euros a year to individual farms, in a deal which finalizes sweeping reforms to the EU's common agricultural policy (CAP).

Under the deal struck late Tuesday, EU governments will have the option of capping individual payouts at 300,000 euros a year. The two other institutions in the talks -- the European Parliament and European Commission -- had wanted a mandatory cap.

Most elements in the complex overhaul of the 50 billion euro-a-year (US$67 billion) CAP were agreed by EU negotiators at the end of June. Among the changes agreed were new environmental requirements for farmers and an end to EU sugar production quotas from 2017.

Tuesday's deal on the remaining issues dispelled any fears that payments to farmers would be disrupted if the legislation was not in place by the start of next year, when the reforms begin to enter force.

"I am delighted that we have now been able to finalise the reform as a whole," EU agriculture commissioner Dacian Ciolos said in a statement.

"This is important for European farmers as it provides them with greater certainty for the coming year."

Other parts of the deal were in line with an agreement struck by EU leaders in February on the bloc's long-term budget for 2014-2020, of which the CAP remains the largest single item.

That includes plans to reduce somewhat the disparity between producers in Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands who receive more than 400 euros per hectare on average, and those in the Baltic states such as Lithuania who get less than 150 euros per hectare.

The deal must now be formally rubber-stamped by EU governments and the parliament before the reforms begin to bite from next year. Changes to the direct subsidies paid to farmers -- worth about 40 billion euros a year -- will only take effect from 2015.


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Dr. Darin Madson - Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Update | SwineCast

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea #Virus #PEDV Update http://t.co/kyF3pa0mGH #swine #ag http://t.co/TAuTOhJFzM #disease
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Meatingplace.com

Meatingplace.com is the online community for North American beef, pork and poultry processors.
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Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: Deadly piglet virus spreads to nearly 200 U.S. farm sites

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: Deadly piglet virus spreads to nearly 200 U.S. farm sites | Livestock | Scoop.it
A swine virus deadly to young pigs, and never before seen in North America, has spiked to 199 sites in 13 states - nearly double the number of farms and other locations from earlier this month.

 

Iowa, the largest U.S. hog producer, has the most sites testing positive for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus: 102 sites, as of June 10. The state raises on average 30 million hogs each year, according to the Iowa Pork Producers Association.

PEDV, most often fatal to very young pigs, causes diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration. It also sickens older hogs, though their survival rate tends to be high. The total number of pig deaths from the outbreak since the first cases were confirmed May 17 is not known.

Researchers at veterinarian diagnostic labs, who are testing samples as part of a broad investigation into the outbreak, have seen a substantial increase in positive cases since early June, when data on the PEDV outbreak showed it at some 103 sites nationwide.

The data was compiled and released last week by Iowa State University, University of Minnesota, Kansas State University and South Dakota State University.

The virus does not pose a health risk to humans or other animals and the meat from PEDV-infected pigs is safe for people to eat, according to federal officials and livestock economists.

But the virus, which is spreading rapidly across the United States, is proving harder to control than previously believed. In addition to Iowa, Oklahoma has 38 positive sites, Minnesota has 19 and Indiana has 10, according to the data.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Wheat Climbs on Speculation China to Boost Purchases; Corn Gains

Wheat Climbs on Speculation China to Boost Purchases; Corn Gains | Livestock | Scoop.it

Wheat futures jumped to a four-week high on speculation that China, the world’s biggest consumer, will increase imports to curb record domestic prices. Corn and soybeans also rose.

China may sell grain from stockpiles and ask state-owned companies to import more to curb rising prices, Shi Wei, an analyst for Shanghai JC Intelligence Co., said today. Wheat in centralHenan province rose 3.4 percent this month to a record 2,760 yuan ($451) a metric ton, datafrom China National Grain & Oils Information Center show. China may triple imports this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Sept. 12.

“Record prices in China may increase demand” for U.S. wheat exports, Jason Britt, the president of Central States Commodities Inc. in Kansas City, Missouri, said in a telephone interview. “It looks like China may become more aggressive importing wheat.”

Wheat futures for delivery in December jumped 1.9 percent to close at $6.705 a bushel at 1:15 a.m. on the Chicago Board of Trade, the biggest gain since Aug. 26. Earlier, the most-active contract touched $6.75, the highest since Aug. 26.

Prices gained for a third day on speculation that a USDA report this month will show Sept. 1 inventories fell 7.6 percent from a year earlier. Traders surveyed by Bloomberg said supplies totaled 1.945 billion bushels, on average, down from 2.105 billion a year earlier.

“Demand is sneaking up, and supplies are getting a little smaller,” Britt said.

Corn futures for December delivery added 1.3 percent to $4.5475 a bushel in Chicago. The most-active contract yesterday dropped to $4.48, the lowest since Aug. 14.

Soybean futures for November delivery rose 0.7 percent to $13.2175 a bushel on the CBOT.


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Swine Product Manager - UK Nationwide - 20698 with Noble Futures | 1401329461

Swine Product Manager - UK Nationwide - 20698 with Noble Futures | 1401329461 | Livestock | Scoop.it
Our client a leading nutrition solutions provider is seeking to appoint a Swine Product Manager covering UK, Europe, Middle East and Africa. This exciting new role within the company will be part of the established EMEA marketing team.
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Site with daily ag careers in Europe 

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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:46 PM

The swine product manager works full time.  The salary is excellent renumeration package.  They do several things while being in the swine product manager such as being a manager/ supevisor, marketing, sales, specialist, and finally a veterinarion.  Most of the time (20-30%) is international travel.  They have to have at least 5 years of experience in either swine feed or animal health industry. 

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:30 AM
Cassie Chriswell: 

The swine product manager works full time and all the time but,  barly ever gets time to take off.  The salary is excellent suprise every time you get paided! They do several things while being in the swine product manager such as being a manager/supevisor, marketing, sales, specialist, and finally a veterinarion.  Most of the time (20-30%) is doing  international travel.   International travel is where you could travel anywhere at any given time!  You could be travaling anywhere!  They have to have at least 5 years of experience in either swine feed or animal health industry to be able to take this job if they ever wanted to do this job!  I dont think i would ever want to take this job because you wouldnt be home that much!   

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Ham inquiry over salmonella outbreak

Ham inquiry over salmonella outbreak | Livestock | Scoop.it
The source of an outbreak of salmonella in north Wales is potentially linked to cooked ham - as 36 more cases are reported in England.
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Caitlin Quilter's curator insight, September 19, 2013 8:30 AM

57 cases salmonella have been reported, 36 of which are in England. The outbreak has thought to have been linked to ham. Researches don't know for sure that ham is the culpret, but most of the patients have reported that they remember eating ham. Many butchers have been tested, but no salmonella has been found. I think it's scary to think that this could become a huge outbreak like the last time. My family eats ham mostly durng the Holidays, so by then I hope that it's not spread here or even still existing at all. 

Leah Mauch's curator insight, October 9, 2013 6:04 AM

36 new cases of salmonella have been reported, from infants to 80 year old prisoners. but no one is sure if it is truely salmonella. The people who seem to have it also have bad hygiene, so they are keeping an eye on it to see what is really happening.

Zack Dafoe's curator insight, December 6, 2013 6:43 AM

The number of confirmed cases had risen to 57 - 36 of them in England.

They range from a seven-month-old baby to a pensioner of 87. Nine people have been treated in hospital.

Experts from Public Health Wales (PHW) have been working with Public Health England, the Food Standards Agency and environmental health officers to find possible links between the cases and trace the source of the outbreak, after it was initially reported last month.

The suppliers have still not been traced but the link to cooked ham is common in the cases so far.

Cases have also been reported in places as far apart as the north east of England and Norfolk.

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State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu - Minnesota Public Radio

State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu - Minnesota Public Radio | Livestock | Scoop.it
State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu
Minnesota Public Radio
A strain of swine influenza swept through fairs last summer sickening 309 people in a dozen states, including Minnesota. One person died from the new virus.
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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:04 PM

I think that it is crazy that last year is sickened 309 people in a dozen different places.  One person died from the new virus.  That is very sad that someone died from the new virus.  If the swine has a temperature then the swine will leave right away so none of the otherones could possible get what that pig has.  It is commonly known as H3N2v, and it is at the top of the list these days.  They even started putting up signs such as one that say " Please wash your hads after visiting the animals!"

Sam Godby's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:07 AM

I think it is very interesting how influenza can be passed from a pig to a human.  There really isn't anything that people can do to prevent this because they most likely figure out that the animal is sick after it is already to late.  At least the official veterinarian of the Minnesota State fair is doing his best to prevent things. 

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:24 AM
Cassie Chriswell: 

I think that it is crazy that last year the swine flu  sickened 309 people in a dozen different places. Only  one person died from the new virus.  I think that it is good that only one perosn died since it was a new virus.  That is very sad that someone died from the new virus.  If the swine had a temperature then the swine will leave right away so none of the otherones could possible get what that pig has.  It is commonly known as H3N2v, and it is at the top of the list these days.  They even started putting up signs such as one that say " Please wash your hads after visiting the animals!"  They also had several other signs out in several differnt places to remind you to wash your hands after you pet/went into the pig barn/swine barn.