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Social Media in Healthcare

Social Media in Healthcare | Piero | Scoop.it

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kamagra-hilfe.com's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:21 AM

Kamagra Bestellen Online Kaufen    http://kamagra-hilfe.com/

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Social Media in Healthcare

Social Media in Healthcare | Piero | Scoop.it

Within the pharma industry, and indeed all other industries, there is an abundance of talk about how social media should or could be used for business benefit. A quick Google search alone returns almost 200 million results for “social media” and over 6 million if you add the word “pharma” in there too.

 

Among all this feverish blogging, it is rare that anyone stops to explain exactly what they mean by social media. But surely it’s obvious and we all know what it is, right?

 

I’m not so sure.

 

You see, I would observe that there are many companies proclaiming to be avid social media users who are actually not, and even some who think they are not but actually are. Confused? Well , it all depends on exactly how you define social media.

 

My own view (representing a sample of one, and possibly just one) is that we get rather fixated on ‘channels’ when we talk about social media. For example, “our company has a Twitter account so we use social media”, or “our Facebook page has 1,000 followers so we use social media”.

However, these are just online media channels, which are enabled for social engagement, but it’s how you use them that makes them social.

So here is an alternative definition of social media (with apologies to anyone I am inadvertently ripping off as I promise this is just from my head):

 

“The term ‘social media’ refers to using digital media channel channels to engage in two-way or multi-way conversation with other individuals and therefore have online social interaction.”


OK, so it’s not the most punchy, but it does make you look at who is active in using social media in a different way.

 

For example, a big pharma company that has a Twitter channel with many thousands of followers, but only ever uses it to broadcast its own messages and never responds to questions or feedback, is not using social media, by this definition (and you know who you are…!).

Equally, there are pharma companies who are not very active on any of the ‘classic’ social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook etc. but do publish blogs where readers are allowed to comment – and the company responds to those comments. This is social media, by the above definition, even if it might be a bit Web 1.0.

 

So here are some important questions to ask about your own social media use:

Do you ever respond to questions from other users?Do you ever ask questions of other users?Are your followers mostly real people working outside your own company?Are most of your posts about something other than you / your company?

If the answer to all of the above is no, I would suggest that you are not using social media, but just broadcasting via social media channels.

To put that into a more real world perspective, it’s a bit like turning up to a networking dinner and standing up in the middle of the room as the first course is being served, then shouting about yourself right through the meal until people have finished the after dinner chocolates and are making their way home.

 

I’m guessing you wouldn’t do that would you? So why do it online.

So my challenge to pharma is this – make 2014 the year of looking in the mirror and asking “am I really being social or just broadcasting via social media channels”.

 

And if you fall in the latter camp, try talking to people – it’s a business trick that’s worked for thousands of years.


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Leo J. Bogee III's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:50 PM

A big pharma company that has a Twitter channel with many thousands of followers, but only ever uses it to broadcast its own messages and never responds to questions or feedback, is not using social media, by this definition (and you know who you are…!)

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2014: The Year of Digital Pharma?

2014: The Year of Digital Pharma? | Piero | Scoop.it

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eMedToday's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:22 PM

These trends need to be incorporated into a e detailing program

Andrea Angioloni's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:17 AM

  RTM the scary word for Pharma

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Is Culture the Solution to Big Pharma's Innovation Problem? - DailyFinance

Is Culture the Solution to Big Pharma's Innovation Problem? - DailyFinance | Piero | Scoop.it
Is Culture the Solution to Big Pharma's Innovation Problem?
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Book Review: The Drugs Don't Work? Antipsychotics, Big Pharma, and Psychiatry - PLoS Blogs (blog)

Book Review: The Drugs Don't Work? Antipsychotics, Big Pharma, and Psychiatry - PLoS Blogs (blog) | Piero | Scoop.it
Book Review: The Drugs Don't Work? Antipsychotics, Big Pharma, and Psychiatry
PLoS Blogs (blog)
Book Review: The Drugs Don't Work? Antipsychotics, Big Pharma, and Psychiatry. By PLOS Guest Blogger Posted: December 18, 2013.
Piero Zito's insight:

The neverending story about use and abuse of Antipsychotics Drugs...what do you think about it?

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Engaging patients could be the solution to rising global healthcare costs #PatientEngagement

Engaging patients could be the solution to rising global healthcare costs #PatientEngagement | Piero | Scoop.it

Health ministers face a dizzying array of possibilities for improving the health of their nations. The most important experts however – ordinary people managing their own health – are typically left out of the equation.

 

Across the world healthcare costs are rising faster than countries' ability to meet them. The answer to the crisis is not going to come from doing more of the same. Instead, harnessing the energy of patients and the public who care about improving their own health – a huge untapped resource – could become the blockbuster solution of the century.

 

With the growth of electronic communication, the internet and social media, patients are increasingly making their voice heard. In mental health, end of life care and antimicrobial resistance, sharing experience has proved a powerful tool for improving quality and reducing costs.

 

A fundamental shift in the way we provide care, in order to encourage increased involvement of patients and the public will be proposed in a report at The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) to be held in Qatar this week (10-11 December).

 

The summit, an initiative of Qatar Foundation and many partners, will bring together 800 leading figures in government, business and the health sector from around the world to address the global challenges that face all health systems.

 

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/2013/dec/10/engaging-patients-solution-healthcare-costs


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Piero Zito's insight:

"The answer to the crisis is not going to come from doing more of the same. Instead, harnessing the energy of patients and the public who care about improving their own health – a huge untapped resource – could become the blockbuster solution of the century"

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Mobile Apps Will Transform All Business: And Pharma?

Mobile Apps Will Transform All Business: And Pharma? | Piero | Scoop.it
Over the last 12 months I’ve surveyed over 700 companies, asking them if they have developed any mobile apps internally to help them with such things as supply chain management, logistics, purchasing (Mobile Apps Will Transform All Business...

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MHealth Initiatives And Target Audiences

MHealth Initiatives And Target Audiences | Piero | Scoop.it

Get to know your target market and their mobile behaviors
As you’re contemplating creating a mobile health application for your patients, it’s important to really take the time to get to know your audience. At the most basic level, your target audience may consist of patients with a particular condition. For example, your healthcare business may be in the process of creating a mobile application that facilitates health management for diabetes patients.

 

 

The best mobile health strategies are backed by strong market research campaigns. Here's how you can use market research to develop effective mHealth initiatives for your patients.

 

More at http://www.instant.ly/blog/2013/12/how-market-research-can-help-your-healthcare-company-reach-patients-with-mobile/


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Keith McGuinness's curator insight, September 13, 2014 6:33 PM

Physician to patient, " Which features of these drugs are the most useful for you?"  Not.  The health objective belongs to the patient, a health expert recommends how to get there.  "m" is about 7 years old.  It needs to take advice  from "health or mHealth will not stick.

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What unthinkable things will mHealth make possible?

What unthinkable things will mHealth make possible? | Piero | Scoop.it

This quote of Nick Mason (the Pink Floyd Drummer) on trends within the music industry got me thinking about some unthinkable things we’ll see materialise as a result of the rapid convergence of mobile and health in this decade.

 

Here’s a few I can think we’ll reflect on:


“10 years ago it was unthinkable that when our health declined we’d learn about it first from our mobile phones” Patient

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we would be as connected to our healthcare teams as we used to be connected to our friends on Facebook and everything done/said was automatically documented” Carer

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we would be making the majority of our incomes from something that wasn’t the office visit” Family GP

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that I would conduct most of my consultations with Patients via Mobile Video Call” Cardiologist

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we’d be able to move beyond the keyboard and use natural language to document consultations” Healthcare Professional

 


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Social Media Implementation Checklist

Social Media Implementation Checklist | Piero | Scoop.it

Set goals first. If traffic, leads and sales are part of the goal, then gotta have the next focus be on content creation. Then, using social to share. Can't get much value out of social unless you're actively creating, publishing and sharing content. 


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Hupertan's curator insight, September 23, 2015 4:32 PM

The implementation of a communications strategy in social media in healthcare need not stick with the drafting of a check list. There she is!

venisabella's comment, November 4, 2015 10:36 AM
http://bit.ly/1FXxmYF
MARGARITA's curator insight, December 31, 2015 5:15 PM

Support our people

http://technomaxs.com/the-best-smart-phone-ever/


http://www.gogetfunding.com/our-children-burial

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Social Media in Healthcare

Social Media in Healthcare | Piero | Scoop.it

Within the pharma industry, and indeed all other industries, there is an abundance of talk about how social media should or could be used for business benefit. A quick Google search alone returns almost 200 million results for “social media” and over 6 million if you add the word “pharma” in there too.

 

Among all this feverish blogging, it is rare that anyone stops to explain exactly what they mean by social media. But surely it’s obvious and we all know what it is, right?

 

I’m not so sure.

 

You see, I would observe that there are many companies proclaiming to be avid social media users who are actually not, and even some who think they are not but actually are. Confused? Well , it all depends on exactly how you define social media.

 

My own view (representing a sample of one, and possibly just one) is that we get rather fixated on ‘channels’ when we talk about social media. For example, “our company has a Twitter account so we use social media”, or “our Facebook page has 1,000 followers so we use social media”.

However, these are just online media channels, which are enabled for social engagement, but it’s how you use them that makes them social.

So here is an alternative definition of social media (with apologies to anyone I am inadvertently ripping off as I promise this is just from my head):

 

“The term ‘social media’ refers to using digital media channel channels to engage in two-way or multi-way conversation with other individuals and therefore have online social interaction.”


OK, so it’s not the most punchy, but it does make you look at who is active in using social media in a different way.

 

For example, a big pharma company that has a Twitter channel with many thousands of followers, but only ever uses it to broadcast its own messages and never responds to questions or feedback, is not using social media, by this definition (and you know who you are…!).

Equally, there are pharma companies who are not very active on any of the ‘classic’ social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook etc. but do publish blogs where readers are allowed to comment – and the company responds to those comments. This is social media, by the above definition, even if it might be a bit Web 1.0.

 

So here are some important questions to ask about your own social media use:

Do you ever respond to questions from other users?Do you ever ask questions of other users?Are your followers mostly real people working outside your own company?Are most of your posts about something other than you / your company?

If the answer to all of the above is no, I would suggest that you are not using social media, but just broadcasting via social media channels.

To put that into a more real world perspective, it’s a bit like turning up to a networking dinner and standing up in the middle of the room as the first course is being served, then shouting about yourself right through the meal until people have finished the after dinner chocolates and are making their way home.

 

I’m guessing you wouldn’t do that would you? So why do it online.

So my challenge to pharma is this – make 2014 the year of looking in the mirror and asking “am I really being social or just broadcasting via social media channels”.

 

And if you fall in the latter camp, try talking to people – it’s a business trick that’s worked for thousands of years.


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Leo J. Bogee III's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:50 PM

A big pharma company that has a Twitter channel with many thousands of followers, but only ever uses it to broadcast its own messages and never responds to questions or feedback, is not using social media, by this definition (and you know who you are…!)

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Pharmaceutical Industry Predictions for 2014

Pharmaceutical Industry Predictions for 2014 | Piero | Scoop.it

FDA Draft Guidance on Social Media: Nope. I know the FDA is due to respond in July 2014, but I believe they will delay, again. And, I’m not sure if they will deliver on the Correction of Misinformation guidance either. But if they do, it will likely be a vague direction. Something to the effect: if the correction is a) relevant to your brand, b) focuses on current indications and adverse events, and c) puts consumer health at risk, you should make a statement IF it’s living on a property that you manage. If not, then the FDA will say we just need to be good citizens and take ownership for correcting misinformation where we see it. And so, we’re back to where we started… 

 

Pharma and the Affordable Care Act: Yep. Some company out there will figure out how to effectively integrate with Electronic Medical Records/Electronic Health Records (can we choose one acronym in 2014?!?) to provide physicians better patient materials and support formulary choice (improving health outcomes being one of the factors behind it). Will that company be yours? Check out what’s coming down the pike here.

 

Relationship with Payers Becomes Crucial: The ACA will have an impact once more. Formulary managers will have more control as consumers participate in Health Exchanges and they (FMs) will scrutinize products for the winning combination of lower price and higher efficacy. Where that line becomes very thin is when they can’t make the case on efficacy and focus on price, generating an industry bidding war. But perhaps publicly releasing clinical data will become more important than ever. Could this create more transparency for the public as a byproduct, which could lead to improving trust in the industry? Maybe.

 

Mobile will Dominate: Wait, didn’t we say this last year? And the year before? So why are so many desktop sites still not mobilized and why is mobile search still a novelty? I hope this does not appear in my predictions for 2015…

 

Wearable Sensors for Fitness/Health will Continue to Improve: Wearable technology will become more integrated and fashionable. This year we saw the FitBit Flex, Samsung Gear, and Google Glass launch. We expect to see more expansion of choices and features in the coming year as people figure out how best to use this increased technology integration in their lives to manage their health. What role will Pharma and Healthcare have in this? Innovation at your fingertips (literally).

Hope everyone has a safe, healthy, and happy holiday season.  See you in 2014!


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Talk It Up: Healthcare Candidates Using Social Media More Than Ever

Talk It Up: Healthcare Candidates Using Social Media More Than Ever | Piero | Scoop.it

According to a new survey by AMN Healthcare, the healthcare industry is beginning to take a heightened interest in social media. From just 21% in 2010, 42% of clinicians reported using social media for job searching and networking this year, and 60% of social media-using healthcare professionals have updated their profiles in the same time frame. 1 in 3 clinicians refrains from posting negative content for the sake of their professional image, and 1 in 4 is searching for increased professional connections online.

 

So why is this increased social media usage important to you as a healthcare employer? These numbers suggest that the healthcare professionals you hire are becoming more professionally-minded on social media—and that means you should be, too.

 

The survey, which polled more than 87,000 healthcare professionals including nurses, physicians, and pharmacists, found that candidates are mostly using social media to research companies and get a feel for their culture when applying or being considered for a job. This includes searching LinkedIn for updates, watching YouTube videos, reading content posted to Facebook, and so on.

 

LinkedIn is shown to be the preferred platform for such networking, though Facebook is also occasionally used by these social media-savvy clinicians.  So while we’re working on providing you with the best possible talent, be sure to—if you don’t already—update and stay active on your company’s LinkedIn profile and other social media pages! Simple steps like posting relevant content and updating on company news can go a long way when forging an accurate presence of your organization’s mission, values, and culture. And as we’ve said before, cultivating and representing a strong company culture is a great way to attract and retain top talent.

 

The following are also excellent ways to amp up your social media presence for both candidates and clients:

Make important information, such as location and contact information, company values and mission, and company updates available on your platform(s) of choiceDisplay professional photos of your organization to give potential candidates a feel for the environmentPost photos of events and initiatives—for example, a picture and a caption of a charity event your staff partook inCreate content that shows you care, such as banners promoting good health, and post them where appropriate (such as a Facebook timeline photo)Stay active and respond to those who interact with your organization through social mediaShare inspiring stories and enlightening announcements to create a positive image

Of course, these are just some of the many ways you can stand out and paint a full picture of your facility on the web. Get creative and come up with some of your own! If you’re new to the world of social media, consider giving our Social Media Series a read to get started.

- See more at: http://blog.execu-search.com/talk-it-up-healthcare-is-using-social-media-more-than-ever/#sthash.vqSfXn73.dpuf


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Piero Zito's insight:

"From just 21% in 2010, 42% of clinicians reported using social media for job searching and networking this year, and 60% of social media-using healthcare professionals have updated their profiles in the same time frame"

Who's surprised of it? 

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Accenture Consumer Survey on Patient Engagement - Infographic

Accenture Consumer Survey on Patient Engagement - Infographic | Piero | Scoop.it
View Accenture’s Consumer Survey on Patient Engagement infographic to see what healthcare consumers want from their providers.

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Piero Zito's insight:

And...what about Italy?

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The ingredients of successful multichannel marketing in pharma

The ingredients of successful multichannel marketing in pharma | Piero | Scoop.it
In the age of reduced face-to-face contact with HCPs, the pharma industry is under pressure to get their multichannel marketing right.

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Andrea Angioloni's curator insight, December 5, 2013 2:54 AM

Multi-channel marketing cannot replace sales but need you need to design the marketing strategy so the multi-channel approach underline and support the efforts of sales team...... this if Marketing and Sales manager are aligned!

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Generic vs. Prescription Drugs: Perceptions and Actions - Michele Deutschman | Kantar Media Healthcare Research

Generic vs. Prescription Drugs: Perceptions and Actions - Michele Deutschman | Kantar Media Healthcare Research | Piero | Scoop.it

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eMedToday's curator insight, December 14, 2013 12:54 AM

Certainly underscore the value of direct contact with doctor to influene prescription sales

eMedToday's curator insight, December 14, 2013 12:54 AM

Certainly underscores the value of direct contact with doctor which is best done by digital means

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Listen and Engage: Pharma and Social Media

Listen and Engage: Pharma and Social Media | Piero | Scoop.it

Globally, 83% of people online use the Internet to find information on chronic illness. Patients and doctors worldwide participate in online communities, sharing experiences and stories.

 

In reality, this leaves pharma no choice but to participate. But should you take an active role or be a passive observer? Trish Nettleship, Director for Social Media and Influence at UCB, believes there are key tenants to successfully engaging in this space, and she shares them with eyeforpharma.

 

“The first thing is to understand patient needs. The second thing is to engage. This is how you build great customer experiences,” said Nettleship. “We’re actively seeking information to better understand what [a patient’s] needs are, and from there we’re looking to engage with our patient community. But the listening never stops.” Done well, this engagement will lead to customers sharing their positive experiences with their peers, effectively advocating on behalf of the company, but soon that won’t be enough.

 

“How do we take it a step further without butting into the conversation? We need to uncover opportunities to help our customers. For example one of our products is a patch, and we’re having conversations about the difficulties people have using it. We know exactly how to solve this. There is an opportunity to go out there and help our customers in a more proactive way. We need to engage outside of our own four walls.”

UCB’s activities within epilepsy are a good example of a well-executed, successful campaign. Trish had frequently heard from physicians and patients that they were still accepting the presence of seizures. “The doctor would ask if they were okay, and they would say they might be better than last year or last month, but they were not seizure-free,” Nettleship recounted, “we build a whole campaign around ‘okay is not good enough, go beyond okay.’ We launched it across all social platforms, and we saw people talking about seizure freedom, using the terminology ‘go beyond okay.’ At the same time, doctors reported more patients coming in talking about the campaign, asking what can be done differently. That was our goal.”

 

What are the features of a successful campaign? It has to be human, and non-intrusive. “The last thing people want on social media is someone butting into a conversation with their own agenda. It’s not about promoting, it’s about help. If we try to promote ourselves, it will have a lot of negative backlash,” Nettleship stressed.

 

“Depending on the problem they’re having, you can point them toward relevant piece of content, but you can’t do that without human interaction.

Another thing is the human touch. Although a lot of companies are trying to automate the way they engage with customers, Nettleship calls it a “huge fail.” Unless the interaction comes across as human, the customers will not have the feeling that they’re being heard, let alone the confidence that the company can help them. “You need to really listen to the conversation. For example someone might say that they can’t pay for their medication in a given month, and then you can refer them to a co-payment program. Depending on the problem they’re having, you can point them toward relevant piece of content, but you can’t do that without human interaction.”

 

Although promising, social media has met with a lot of resistance from pharma, where you can hear executives expressing their concerns over the regulatory limitations they’re facing. “I can’t comprehend people who use the regulatory environment as an excuse,” Nettleship confessed. “The regulatory environment does make things more challenging, but we really need to look out for the opportunities,” she added. People nowadays assume that brands are going to help them with problems they’re having, regardless of whether this is regulated or non-regulated space. For example, in the airline industry, it is now expected that if you tweet about the problem, the response will come within 30 minutes.

“It crosses all boundaries. People are thinking about the problem they’re having, and they’re looking to the company to help them solve it. We have to find a way to help without crossing the regulatory line, and there’s plenty of ways to do that.”

 

All that, however, must be exercised with caution to avoid breaking the rules. For example, a conversation about the brand is unacceptable within a disease-stage community. “We can’t have people talking about medication, and that’s a challenge because that’s what people want, but we can build awareness around a disease without talking about any of our brands.”

 

“I will be the first one to tell you that we haven’t got the ROI figured out completely […] It’s not always about sales, it’s about what we’re trying to accomplish.

Another concern raised by many pharma companies is the requirement to report adverse events. “Many companies are shying away from social because of that,” Nettleship admitted, stressing that at UCB they have taken a different approach, and are seeking adverse events proactively. “I personally believe that it’s our responsibility to report adverse events to the appropriate regulatory bodies, but also to take it one step further, reach out to that person, and help them understand where they can find help.”

 

It’s all well and good, but how does social translate to ROI? “I will be the first one to tell you that we haven’t got the ROI figured out completely. You need to think about your business objectives, which aren’t specifically tied to the ROI. It’s not always about sales, it’s about what we’re trying to accomplish.”

 

Nevertheless, trust remains a big obstacle in social media campaigns. “Stepping outside my role, I would say people are very hesitant to trust pharma. There’s a lot of work to do, but I think social media is a great tool for that ‘cause we know people trust their peers in what they say. If they say they have a positive experience with us, and if they start talking about that, this is where we’re going to build trust, but that won’t happen overnight,” Nettleship concluded.

 

- See more at: http://social.eyeforpharma.com/digital/listen-and-engage-pharma-and-social-media#sthash.MeGxo2w8.dpuf


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Piero Zito's insight:

“The first thing is to understand patient needs. The second thing is to engage. This is how you build great customer experiences”

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e detailing with evidence based medicine

eMedToday Clinical Desk For Pharma 1 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE ‘CLINICAL DESK’ APPLICATION Refresh the Pharma-Doctor Relationship through remote selling The Fu

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eMedToday's curator insight, December 4, 2013 8:42 PM

'the heart of clinical desk is a app called uptodate. You can read about up todate on this page with post next to this one called

 

Digital doctors: how mobile apps are changing healthcare

eMedToday's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:01 PM

you can see the value of clinical tools for doctors on this page with articled called

 

Digital doctors: how mobile apps are changing healthcare with e detailing

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What unthinkable things will mHealth make possible?

What unthinkable things will mHealth make possible? | Piero | Scoop.it

This quote of Nick Mason (the Pink Floyd Drummer) on trends within the music industry got me thinking about some unthinkable things we’ll see materialise as a result of the rapid convergence of mobile and health in this decade.

 

Here’s a few I can think we’ll reflect on:


“10 years ago it was unthinkable that when our health declined we’d learn about it first from our mobile phones” Patient

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we would be as connected to our healthcare teams as we used to be connected to our friends on Facebook and everything done/said was automatically documented” Carer

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we would be making the majority of our incomes from something that wasn’t the office visit” Family GP

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that I would conduct most of my consultations with Patients via Mobile Video Call” Cardiologist

“10 years ago it was unthinkable that we’d be able to move beyond the keyboard and use natural language to document consultations” Healthcare Professional

 


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Pharma Marketing Blog: Pharma Needs Customer Experience Centers of Excellence

Pharma Marketing Blog: Pharma Needs Customer Experience Centers of Excellence | Piero | Scoop.it
Pharma Needs Customer Experience Centers of Excellence to implement a customer-centric strategy: http://t.co/LGAGseDHx1 #PharmaContent
Piero Zito's insight:

"Pharma needs more people who understand the customer and what makes for an excellent customer experience no matter if the "touch points" involve "content," traditional marketing, or digital communications"

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