Le flux d'Infogre...
Follow
Find tag "mixed-use"
25.8K views | +5 today
Le flux d'Infogreen.lu
IDD... Idées Développement Durable, votre fil d'info
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

MARS Architects Cleverly Fold Climbing Walls into Bulgaria's First Sustainable Activity Center

MARS Architects Cleverly Fold Climbing Walls into Bulgaria's First Sustainable Activity Center | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it
MARS Architects snagged first place in an international competition for the design Walltopia's Collider Activity Center, Sofia's first sustainable mixed use center.

Located in Sofia, the Collider Activity Center will mark the city's first green mixed use center to combine both leisure and exercise space. To tie together the site’s diverse programs, the architects inserted a series of dramatic climbing atriums into the folds of the building, creating a continuous climbing experience.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Jon Carter's curator insight, January 4, 2014 4:22 PM

Super cool, gotta go to Sofia for this one. Deep Water solo outdoor pool, with boulder's galore in the park outside, not too mention a few K square ft of climbing inside. Outside walls are transparent showing climbers moves.. So nice.

Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.

 

The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...

 


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:10 AM

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 11:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 9:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..
Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Aspire Mixed-Use Tower Proposal by Grimshaw Architects

Aspire Mixed-Use Tower Proposal by Grimshaw Architects | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Emerging from a design excellence competition held by the Parramatta City Council, the Aspire Tower, designed by Grimshaw Architects, is a landmark mixed-use tower set to establish a new benchmark for innovative, passive-environmental design in Australian high-rise developments.

Designed to act as a catalyst project for Parramatta Square, the tower provides high density, urban residential living which is not only affordable but also sustainable.

As one of the tallest structures in Australia, the engineering of Aspire Tower consciously orientates itself to the wind and to sunlight. The highly adaptable facades accommodate all of the various planning arrangements of apartment type into a modular system. The tower’s striking sculptural form twists upwards from its Church Street alignment to maximise the capture of the sun, the breeze and northern views for its residents.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, April 19, 2013 9:20 AM

"As one of the tallest structures in Australia, the engineering of Aspire Tower consciously orientates itself to the wind and to sunlight. The highly adaptable facades accommodate all of the various planning arrangements of apartment type into a modular system. The tower’s striking sculptural form twists upwards from its Church Street alignment to maximise the capture of the sun, the breeze and northern views for its residents."