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Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects

Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

The Tea Houses are places where one could retreat into nature- there are three, each with its own purpose: meditation, sleeping and ‘visioning’ or creative thinking.


Each tea house is designed as a transparent steel and glass pavilion, hovering like a lantern over the natural landscape. Cast-in-place concrete core elements anchor the pavilions, supporting steel channel rim joists which cantilever beyond the cores to support the floor and roof planes. With its minimal footprint, the design treads lightly on the land, minimizing grading and preserving the delicate root systems of the native oaks.


Via Lauren Moss
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Emeric Nectoux's comment, January 9, 2014 12:22 AM
Beautiful! I'm a big fan
Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, January 9, 2014 5:51 PM

My humble glass and wood greenhouse is my go to Tea House. Everyone needs a personal place to quietly be. And tea is always recommended. 

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House D by HHF architekten

House D by HHF architekten | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Located in Nulgar, Switzerland, House D by HHF Architects has an oriention parallel to the landscape, making the view a matter of prime importance- aross more than 180 degrees, vistas include verdant land with mature fruit trees.


The design accentuates the site with a few simple moves: The main level is an open space – with the kitchen as well as dining and living areas – and alongside a concrete core, the stair to the upper and lower floors. The space is entirely glazed and blends seamlessly with the space outdoors. The outdoor space itself is an oversized terrace overlooking a pool. Because the terrain slopes downward slightly, the wood deck is elevated, which protects the main living space from the curious glances of passers-by.


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In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan

In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Wind-dyed House by acaa in Yokosuka Kanagawa, Japan


From the architect:

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.

 

The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.


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Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture

Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Angophora House was designed by Richard Cole Architecture, and it is located in Waverton, a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

“Built over an escarpment in a densely urbanised heritage conservation area in Waverton, the form of this house responds to the difficult site using the elements of cave, platform and canopy. On entering the house from the upper road, one passes through a curvaceous enclosing concrete wall with rooftop garden over.

Two platforms launch into the space of the valley, extending out from the anchoring escarpment. Insulated timber moveable walls transform the space from warm and enclosing to open and unimpeded. A sheltering timber lined roof opens to the north, falls in response to the slope of the land and captures framed views of adjacent Angophora trees.

The escarpment is retained, raw and open to the rooms of the lower ground floor. A dramatic lift takes the owners to the garage on the street below.”


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Quince's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:11 PM

"Utilizing the elements of Cave , Platform, and Canopy"  I haven't heard that one before, but I like it! Very nice open design

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, January 8, 2014 5:50 PM

Preciosa casa en Sydney, con un uso magistral de la madera y el hormigón y una increíble fluidez entre el exterior y el interior.

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Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

San Francisco-based Feldman Architecture have designed the Caterpillar House.


The design for the Caterpillar House, sited on the softly rolling hills of the Santa Lucia Preserve, sought to accentuate a connection to the land.  Having lived in a Cliff May home, the client came to the project with a love of modern ranch houses and looking for an environmentally-conscious response to a beautiful site.

The Caterpillar House implements sustainable elements while exploring a contemporary version of the ranch ideals: massing that is low and horizontal, an open plan with a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, and main living areas which center informally on the kitchen...


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