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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Pop-Up House by Multipod Studio

Pop-Up House by Multipod Studio | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Multipod Studio have designed the Pop-Up House, a housing concept that is low cost, uses recyclable materials and can be built in four days.


The structure, compiled of insulating blocks and wooden panels, delivers affordable thermal insulation. Heating represents close to 28% of global energy consumption and is also one of the main household costs. Determined to develop solutions, Multipod Studio have patented a unique approach to passive construction that delivers outstanding thermal insulation at an affordable cost.

No special tools required, the house is assembled using lightweight and recyclable materials for quick installation.

The materials used are inexpensive and the thermal envelope means no additional heating is necessary. 
The Pop-Up House is an innovative concept that aims to challenge passive house construction.


Via Lauren Moss
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Catherine Devin's curator insight, March 28, 2014 7:02 AM

This ise also an interesting option for seasonal, holiday use, optimizing the building lifecycle for this particular type of use.... while giving also some flexibility in this type of business.

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India Art n Design Global Hop : Smart & Compact Student Housing

India Art n Design Global Hop : Smart & Compact Student Housing | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it
Student housing is now smarter and cheaper, thanks to Tengbom Architects.

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India Art n Design's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:45 AM
Student housing is now smarter and cheaper, thanks to Tengbom Architects. Along with Lund University students in Sweden, Tengbom has designed student units of only 10 square meters in collaboration with wood manufacturer Martinsons and real estate company AF Bostäder.
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Blu Homes Prefab: Breezehouse

Blu Homes Prefab: Breezehouse | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

The Breezehouse, one of Michelle Kaufmann’s iconic designs, is the model for the first Blu Homes development in New York State, consisting of 12 home sites ranging from 6.8 to 24 acres overlooking the Hudson River Valley and the Catskills.


The local developer worked with conservancy groups to sustainably develop the project set amid woods, streams, ponds, and vistas. The three-bedroom, three-bath dwelling features a light-filled indoor environment that connects seamlessly with the natural landscape. Structural steel framing and advanced building science make it possible to withstand extreme weather, including high snow loads and wind gusts of up to 110 mph.


Blu Homes are LEED Silver certifiable upon leaving the factory and are solar-ready. Beyond the standard green features that Blu includes in every home, such as recycled steel framing, radiant heat flooring, high R-value walls and energy-efficient appliances, Blu Homes can achieve net zero energy status, Energy Star rating and higher LEED certifications with the inclusion of other available green elements.


Via Lauren Moss
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Debbie Walsh's comment, February 2, 2013 4:23 PM
Very cool!
Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Cantilevered Two Hulls House Overlooking the Sea in Nova Scotia, Canada

Cantilevered Two Hulls House Overlooking the Sea in Nova Scotia, Canada | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Two Hulls is a detached house in Nova Scotia, Canada, that allows water to flow freely underneath the structure.

Floating above the sandy beach, Two Hulls is one of the many fascinating detached houses designed by  MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Cantilevered on concrete foundations, it allows the water to flow freely underneath the structure, without harming the house in any way. The perfect place to construct a seaside refuge home, the isolated plot of land, guarded by trees and lush vegetation on one side and the sea on the other,  offers mind-blowing views, encouraging a relaxing lifestyle...


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The +Energy House in Germany

The +Energy House in Germany | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

From the architect:

The +Energy House lies down as a flat structure on the sloping site and forms at the upper floor a platform that connects inside and outside together and offers a magnificent view of the countryside. The two-storey structure incorporates mixed construction systems: concrete on the ground floor, with wood upstairs.

Additionally, dowelled laminated timber elements enable the structure to be entirely built without glues, with a clients request for pollution-free construction and ecological building materials.


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notliebags's comment, September 27, 2013 12:18 PM
cool design
António Sousa Correia's curator insight, September 27, 2013 7:56 PM

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Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

This translucent cabin by architects Kengo Kuma and Associates is an experimental house in Hokkaidō, Japan, designed to test the limits of architecture in cold climates.


Kengo Kuma and Associates were inspired by the traditional architecture of the indigenous Ainu, whose "Chise" style buildings clad with sedge or bamboo grass hold in the warmth of a central fireplace that is never allowed to burn out.

"The fundamental idea of Chise, 'house of the earth,' is to keep warming up the ground this way and retrieve the radiation heat generated from it," say the architects. The Experimental House was constructed around a coated larch frame and it has a thick layer of polyester insulation sandwiched between the polycarbonate cladding of the exterior and the glass-fibre fabric of the interior. This insulation was made using recycled plastic bottles and it allows light to pass into the house through the walls.

As the first experimental house completed for the Meme Meadows research facility, the building will be used by the environmental technology institute to test how different factors affect the thermal qualities of its construction.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:38 AM

There is a new group of trendsetters uniting architects, designers, tech guys and just curious-all-of us, creating new mashups that can turn into future trends some day

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Alaskan EcoEscape Permaculture's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:39 PM

Interesting green build????  It's certainly not a natural build though.