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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing

Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing | Picto Communication Partner | Scoop.it

Light Park is a skyscraper that hovers over the streets of Beijing like a giant airship. Architects Ting Xu and Yiming Chen have conceived the future of high-rises to be a conglomerate of mega-structures that make up for the shortage of urban open spaces on the ground by lifting them up in the air.


The Light Park skyscraper is lifted off the ground with a helium-filled balloon, and it uses solar energy for propulsion, enabling it to function as a non-polluting transportation deck as well as a floating urban park. The technology is based on existing helium balloon designs, using solar-powered propellers, airbags and atmospheric pressure for takeoff and cruise flight. Solar power is utilized to power the uses below, with translucent solar panels located on the top of the aircraft. In order to avoid additional weight and decrease wind resistance, the skyscraper uses a cable-suspended structure to attach the slabs to the mushroom-like cap. The planting slabs are irrigated with rainwater collected on the large cap surface and are distributed in a way which allows maximum exposure to sunlight on each level...



Via Lauren Moss
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Amber Qureshi's curator insight, April 8, 2013 1:19 PM

Daaamnnn :O 

Noor Fatima's comment, April 9, 2013 10:01 AM
incredibleeeee
Amber Qureshi's comment, April 12, 2013 3:12 AM
Ikr :D
Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from Digital Sustainability
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New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry...

New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry... | Picto Communication Partner | Scoop.it

If you want a preview of the downtown Vancouver streetscape in 2035, start with a walk down Granville or Georgia Street today.

Most of the buildings will still be standing. There will be additions and replacements, but most of the changes that will transform downtown's living, work and retail space will be undetectable from the sidewalk. That includes upgrades to water and energy systems in buildings that in 2012 are models of inefficiency by contemporary standards, let alone future ones.

"If you are thinking 2035, realistically 80% of the buildings that will be in existence at that time have already been constructed," said Innes Hood, a professional engineer and senior associate with Stantec Consulting, a consulting firm with 12,000 planners, architects, engineers, project managers and experts, working in teams to break down the boundaries between designers, contractors and investors, while using advanced computer modelling programs.

 

Retrofits are crucial.

One of Hood's main assignments is overseeing the redevelopment of existing buildings. More often than not, that means uncovering, through energy audits, glaring examples of waste - air leaks, inadequate insulation, inefficient heating and ventilation systems.

"We are involved in residential projects where we can achieve 80-per-cent reduction in energy use and become essentially greenhouse gas neutral through the implementation of cost-effective technologies," Hood said. "We're not having to strive to the leading edge. These are tried and true technologies around good building enclosures and high-performance mechanical systems such as heat pump technology...


Via Lauren Moss, Digital Sustainability
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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture

Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture | Picto Communication Partner | Scoop.it

Today, architecture finds itself at a crossroads.

Building materials and new construction, along with the operation and maintenance of buildings, account for a significant sum of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Faced with this fact, how are architects to responsibly pursue the act (and art) of architecture without further deteriorating the planet’s environmental make-up or depleting its resources?

What forms of high and low technology can be developed to curtail the injurious side of building?

Can good—or even great—architecture be sustainable?

 

The answer, of course, is yes. The best buildings have always shown a concern for their immediate environs and how they fit in them, whether they were conscious of “sustainability” or not. Now, all architects and buildings are expected to be engaged with sustainable standards, such as LEED titles, photovoltaic cells, or green roofs—all things that these 10 projects have in common. Check out our favorite projects in architecture + sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss
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Lauren Moss's curator insight, January 17, 2013 6:32 PM

A curated collection of (relatively) recent sustainable building projects that highlight innovative approaches to environmental design and green building, with links provided for additional information and details.

Paige's curator insight, August 6, 2:47 PM

Green architecture! I've dreamt and have considered going into a field of real estate specializing in the building and selling of eco-friendly homes!