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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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A Sustainable Home in Silicon Valley

A Sustainable Home in Silicon Valley | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Spatial efficiency meets energy efficiency in this Bay Area home designed by an architect for his parents.

Designed by San Francisco-based Spiegel Aihara Workshop (SAW), the Cotton Street residence integrates elements of the ranch house and adapts them to our increasing need for a greener architecture. The architects drew from a wide array of design strategies in order to make the building more sustainable, striving for maximum flexibility of living configurations along with high energy savings. Designed with a sense of consideration for the site, the residence takes advantage of natural lighting and passive ventilation, while its owners equipped the spaces with energy efficient appliances, radiant floor heating, and a solar system for energy generation.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.

 

The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...

 


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Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:10 AM

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 11:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 9:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..
Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Quilted greenhouse by C. F. Møller inflates to alter light and heat

Quilted greenhouse by C. F. Møller inflates to alter light and heat | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

A facade of translucent plastic pillows can be pumped up to alter lighting and temperature inside this domed greenhouse, located at the Aarhus botanical gardens, by C. F. Møller.


The architects worked with membrane facade specialist formTL to create the ETFE plastic facade of the new Tropical House to provide an energy-efficient envelope with a quilted texture around the 18-metre-high structure.

The light and heat conditions within the building can be adapted by increasing or decreasing the air pressure inside the pillows, which then changes the translucence of the facade.

The domed shape and the building's orientation in relation to the points of the compass have been chosen because this precise format gives the smallest surface area coupled with the largest volume, as well as the best possible sunlight incidence in winter, and the least possible in summer," said the architects.


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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:45 PM

very innovative