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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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The Warehaus by Residential Attitudes

The Warehaus by Residential Attitudes | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Light, volume & space were the primary influences behind this passive solar residence designed for multi-generational living. A central courtyard with two storey mezzanine walkway forms the focal point of the home.

The free form living area features a central polished plaster ethanol fireplace and is adjacent to the state of the art kitchen with a concealed cool room and pantry. The remainder of the ground floor is comprised of a library, powder room, laundry and a separate master wing with dressing room, ensuite and private courtyard.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

San Francisco-based Feldman Architecture have designed the Caterpillar House.


The design for the Caterpillar House, sited on the softly rolling hills of the Santa Lucia Preserve, sought to accentuate a connection to the land.  Having lived in a Cliff May home, the client came to the project with a love of modern ranch houses and looking for an environmentally-conscious response to a beautiful site.

The Caterpillar House implements sustainable elements while exploring a contemporary version of the ranch ideals: massing that is low and horizontal, an open plan with a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, and main living areas which center informally on the kitchen...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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Edgeland Residence by Bercy Chen Studio

Edgeland Residence by Bercy Chen Studio | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Bercy Chen Studio have designed the Edgeland Residence on the shores of the Colorado River.


Located on a rehabilitated brownfield site, the project is a modern re-interpretation of one of the oldest housing typologies in North America, the Native American Pit House. The Pit House, typically sunken, takes advantage of the earth’s mass to maintain thermal comfort throughout the year.

Edgeland Residence’s relationship to the landscape both in terms of approach as well as building performance involves an insulative green roof and a 7-foot excavation – gaining benefits from the earth’s mass to help it stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Such an architectural setting presents an opportunity for maximum energy efficiency when combined with high performance systems such as the integrated hydronic HVAC system...


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's comment, February 18, 2013 11:26 AM
Wow...great piece...so much light and beautiful architectural details...plus the green details and efficiency of the "underground" factor...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, February 18, 2013 4:38 PM

Typically I have focused on large commercial architecture. Today I am sharing this great scoop from our friend Lauren Moss. The architects are Bercy Chen Studio LP based in Austin, Texas.


Thomas is from Belgium and Calvin is from Taiwan by way of Australia; the partners’ European and Asian backgrounds form a design philosophy of unique perspectives. The work is influenced by vernacular precedents from various cultures- whether Islamic, Indian, African or pre-columbian, while maintaining respect for the particular contemporary contextual conditions.

http://bcarc.com/Page/about

 

After you view this project I am certain you too will be impressed. What stands out from a visual perspective is the light and angles of the home... then all the details of the energy efficiency....have a read and see and do leave comments....

Rescooped by Frédéric Liégeois from sustainable architecture
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In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan

In Harmony with the Environment: Wind-dyed House, Japan | Le flux d'Infogreen.lu | Scoop.it

Wind-dyed House by acaa in Yokosuka Kanagawa, Japan


From the architect:

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.

 

The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight. Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.


Via Lauren Moss
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