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BD’s ETHNOBOTANY LIBRARY IS OPEN – Become a member!

BD’s ETHNOBOTANY LIBRARY IS OPEN – Become a member! | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it

The new library of Botanical Dimensions holds a treasure trove of books, periodicals and articles on all aspects of wide-ranging ethnobotany: Certainly lots on plants (botany) and fungi (mycology), but also ecology, indigenous knowledge systems, biodiversity,...

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Long List of Mangosteen Healing Properties

To sum it all up, here's a partial list of the 200-plus, mind-boggling Mangosteen medicinal benefits and properties from the catalog of prominent ethnobotani...

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Cutting-edge genetics circles back to traditional medicine, says expert

Cutting-edge genetics circles back to traditional medicine, says expert | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Genetic tests are putting advanced scientific techniques to work solving an ancient question, says an expert in alternative medicine: how does human uniqueness affect a person’s health. P
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Frankincense More Effective Than Chemotherapy in Killing Ovarian Cancer Cells, Study

Frankincense More Effective Than Chemotherapy in Killing Ovarian Cancer Cells, Study | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
By Stephen Adkins - University Herald Leicester University researchers have found a cure for ovarian cancer in an aromatic gum resin obtained from an African tree.
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Black Seed – ‘The Remedy For Everything But Death’

Black Seed – ‘The Remedy For Everything But Death’ | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
by Sayer Ji - Greenmedinfo.com This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic's pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.
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Video: 5 Signs of a Healthy Hive - Hobby Farms

Regular checks of the hive and ensuring bees have adequate food supplies throughout the growing season and winter help to keep your hives—and bees—healthy.
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Indigenous Peoples and the Diversity of Food

Indigenous Peoples and the Diversity of Food | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Today is International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. This year’s theme around building alliances is a reminder that indigenous people are often left out of political decision making process...
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Stillwater: Swarm Chasers preserve, protect bees - Pioneer Press

Stillwater: Swarm Chasers preserve, protect bees - Pioneer Press | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Stillwater: Swarm Chasers preserve, protect bees
Pioneer Press
At least that's what Bob Sitko is asking of Twin Cities metro area residents who find swarms of bees where they're unwanted.
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'Trojan hives' carry parasites to native bees - Conservation

'Trojan hives' carry parasites to native bees - Conservation | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Many bumblebee colonies imported into the UK for crop pollination are infested with parasites, a study in the Journal of Applied Ecology suggests.
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nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Bee Faithful? Plant-Pollinator Relationships Compromised When Bee Species Decline - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Bee Faithful? Plant-Pollinator Relationships Compromised When Bee Species Decline - US National Science Foundation (NSF) | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
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The health benefits of turmeric outperform prescription drugs | Natural Health 365

The health benefits of turmeric outperform prescription drugs | Natural Health 365 | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
In exploring the health benefits of turmeric, this ancient spice has been used for thousands of years and stands as one of the world’s most consumed foods.
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An ethnobotanical approach to drug discovery: The case of Bali

Ethnobotany falls within the “knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe”, which constitute humanity’s intangible cultural ...

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Is the 2015 Nobel Prize a turning point for traditional Chinese medicine?

Is the 2015 Nobel Prize a turning point for traditional Chinese medicine? | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
The first Chinese Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded for work based on traditional Chinese medicine. Will traditional medical knowledge now share the spotlight with evidence-based medicine?
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Giirvani - Ayurvedic Remedies | 10 Common Herbs and Spices Used In Ayurveda

Giirvani - Ayurvedic Remedies | 10 Common Herbs and Spices Used In Ayurveda | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
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Killer bee attack saves a woman’s life and inspires amazing product

Killer bee attack saves a woman’s life and inspires amazing product | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Could bee venom cure Lyme disease?
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Botany and health: Very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids cause very large effects on human immune system

Botany and health: Very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids cause very large effects on human immune system | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
Very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids cause very large effects when the plant natural products are tested for their impact on the human immune system.
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As climate, disease links become clearer, study highlights need to forecast future shifts | UGA Today

As climate, disease links become clearer, study highlights need to forecast future shifts | UGA Today | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
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Species Evolution Not Fast Enough to Cope With a Changing World

Species Evolution Not Fast Enough to Cope With a Changing World | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it

Scientists know that climate change is putting species around the globe in peril, but just how much peril? After all, when evolution failed to keep pace with a major climatic event 65 million years ago, half the planet's species went extinct and dinosaurs were reduced to jittery feathered creatures that get bullied by squirrels on bird-feeders. A new study suggests that our current era of climate change won't just exceed the rate of evolution, but will do so by a factor of thousands. Although the work doesn't go so far as predicting an extinction rate, it doesn't bode well for the near future of global biodiversity.

 

The world has warmed 0.6°C in the past few decades, and climate models say that we could see another 4° by century's end. "We want to know if species will be able to adapt to climate change quickly enough based on how they adapted to climate change in the past," says evolutionary ecologist John Wiens, of the University of Arizona in Tucson, and lead author of the new study. Wiens decided to investigate by looking at the top branches of family trees.

 

When two living species are closely related, scientists can estimate how long ago they diverged, thus providing an age for their common ancestor. Researchers can also estimate temperature and precipitation in that ancestor's habitat, using evolutionary models. With help from Yale University biology student Ignacio Quintero, Wiens calculated such estimates for 540 species in 17 groups of living vertebrates. They studied reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals primarily native to North and Central America, but with some European, Asian, Australian, South American, and African species as well. Then they used global climate models to determine how the local climate of each species is expected to change by the end of this century.

 

Despite differences in local climate and in the vertebrates themselves, the results were consistent. The average rate of adaptation for 15 of the 17 groups was less than 1°C per million years. Two groups adapted slightly faster, but still below 2° per million years. So if a frog breeds in autumn because the temperature is right, it might adapt to warmer temperatures by breeding in December, January, or February. And lizards that survive on those eggs might have to change their diet. But the study found that such adaptations typically occur about 10,000 to 100,000 times too slowly to keep pace with global warming projections for the year 2100. The researchers reached the same conclusion for the expected regional increases and decreases in rainfall: Again, the species adapted 10,000 to 100,000 times too slowly.

 

Adapting too slowly does not mean certain death. A species can relocate. But due to habitat destruction and other factors, not all species can move. If a rodent lives on a mountain and warmer temperatures compel the animal to climb higher, it may run out of mountain while temperatures keep rising.

 

Wiens was surprised by the results because they suggest that the studied species, which typically adapt to less than 1°C of change per million years, now must adapt to 4° between now and the year 2100. "It's almost crazy to think that they're going to, in just a few decades, be more different than they've become over millions of years," he says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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CCJD's curator insight, March 10, 2015 7:07 PM

humans need to slow down climate change by finding an alternate fuel source to replace fossil fuels and find other solutions to reduce the pace of greenhouse gas emissions. if we do not, precious animal life could be lost in the future.

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Widely used pesticide toxic to honeybees

Widely used pesticide toxic to honeybees | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
New research concludes that the absence of mortality does not always indicate functional integrity.
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Fipronil named as fourth insecticide to pose risk to honeybees

Fipronil named as fourth insecticide to pose risk to honeybees | phytopharmaceuticals, pollinators, biodiversity | Scoop.it
European Food Safety Authority says insecticide poses 'high acute risk' when used as a seed treatment for maize
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