Physics of Bicycles
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Scooped by Justin Kramer
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Present Resources List, #2

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Justin Kramer's insight:

Resources List:

 

#1

Eley, Daniel. “The Physics of Bicycles” Swanee. n.p. 2006. Web. 10 Nov 2013. <www.sewanee.edu/physics/SEMINARS/Daniel06.ppt‎>

 

This resource contains a powerpoint going over many of the physics of bicycles, and provides a good starting point of what to look at. It looks like it was probably written by a student, and I would want to verify any formulas they came up with. They also list a lot of sources at the end which would be useful to look into.

 

#2

Kooijman, J. D. G. and Schwab, A. L. “Experimental Validation of the Lateral Dynamics of a Bicycle on a Treadmill.” Laboratory for Engineering Mechanics, Delft University of Technology. ASME, 2009. Web. 12 Nov 2013. <http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/schwab/Publications/KooijmanSchwab2009.pdf>;

 

This article deals with the lateral dynamics of a bicycle and its motion on a flat surface compared to on a slanted treadmill. I think it may be useful for writing about a bicycle’s lateral motion and whether inclines affect it or not. It is also a professional paper and appears to carry more credibility, although I’m not sure how useful the article will be as a whole.

 

#3

Fajans , J. “Steering in bicycles and motorcycles.” Department of Physics, University of California. American Association of Physics Teachers, 2000.

 Web. 14 Nov. 2013 <http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~fajans/pub/pdffiles/SteerBikeAJP.PDF>

 

I think this article will be very useful because it deals specifically with steering in bicycles and motorcycles, and steering is one of my main sub-topics. It provides numerous mathematical formulas, detailed descriptions of how they are derived and work, and figures to help illustrate them. It also challenges how much gyroscopic roles play an effect in bicycle turning. I think this article will prove very useful.

 

#4

“Introducing Precession and Gyroscopic Issues” Wayback Machine. Lose the Training Wheels, 2007. Web. 8 Nov 2013. <http://web.archive.org/web/20080213072335/http://www.losethetrainingwheels.org/default.aspx?Lev=2&ID=34>;

 

I had thought gyroscopic forces played a primary role in keeping a bicycle upright, but this article claims they are not necessary at all. This is at odds with what some other physics sites say and is extremely interesting to hear competing viewpoints. It gives an overview of work done at an Illinois university, but also appears to date from the late ‘80s and so future developments may make this information outdated. It could be a dead-end, or a door-opener to more recent research confirming their hypotheses.

 

#5

Hess, Ronald and Hubbard, Mont. “Bicycle dynamics, control and handling.” Sports Biomechanics Lab. UC—Davis. Jun 06, 2012. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://biosport.ucdavis.edu/research-projects/bicycle> ;

 

I don’t know how useful this source will be, and appears to be more of a dead-end. It’s a research project that seems to want to take into account the human mass and motion in determining the motion of a bicycle; since the mass of the rider accounts for most of the mass in the human-bicycle-road system, it cannot be neglected and has much bearing on how the bicycle operates. However, there doesn’t seem to be too many conclusions at this point.

#6

Kooijman, J. D. G., Meijaard, J.P., Papadopoulos, Jim. M, and Schwab, A.L. “A bicycle can be self-stable without gyroscopic or caster effects.” n.p. 14 April, 2011. Web. 14 Nov. 2013.

<http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/stablebicycle/StableBicyclev34Revised.pdf>;

 

 I haven’t been able to track down the original version of this article yet, which appears to have been published in Science Magazine. I think it will be useful in determining how a bicycle stays upright, which appears to be a rather contentious and unresolved problem at this point. It goes in great detail how they did their analysis, and I think their works cited at the end will be useful for further digging.

 

 #7

“How much effect does the mass of a bicycle tire have on acceleration?” Physics.stackexchange. stack exchange inc., 2011. Web. 14 Nov 2013. <http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/18725/how-much-effect-does-the-mass-of-a-bicycle-tire-have-on-acceleration> ;

 

This page resource is mainly in a blog-type setting where different users, presumably with knowledge in physics, answered the question of how much effect the bicycle tire mass has on acceleration. There are some useful formulas in here that may be useful, but would need to be corroborated with other sources. It’s not definitive on its own, but appears to be a good start for the mechanics of bicycle acceleration. 

 

#8

Beck, R.F. “Mountain Bicycle Acceleration and Braking Factors.” Casteel, Beck & Associates, Inc. Proceedings of the Canadian Multidisciplinary Road Safety Conference XIV, 27-30 June 2004. Web. 15 Nov. 2013.<http://www.carsp.ca/uploaded_files/fck/File/CMRSC%20Proceedings/2004_CMRSC_XIV_Ottawa/Papers/7a1.pdf> ;

 

This resource deals primary with bicycle acceleration (both positive and negative via braking) to help determine the best ways to decrease bicycle accidents. It contains a substantial amount of data and I think it will be useful in discussing bicycle acceleration. It doesn’t contain any explicit formulas, however.

 

 #9

Jones, David E. H. “The stability of the bicycle.” Physics Today.  Sep. 2006, Vol. 59 Issue 9, p 51-56. Web. 13 Nov 2013.<http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,cpid&custid=s6246812&db=sch&AN=22265400&site=ehost-live&scope=site> ;

 

I located this article through Madison College’s library and it appears to be an excellent resource on the dynamics that go into keeping a bicycle upright. It challenges some of the common perceptions of how a bicycle works and why some explanations are not sufficient. It also appears, from this article and many others, that my topic is a lot more complicated than I had ever originally thought. I think I’ll be able to use this to further my discussion on bicycle stability and motion.

 

 #10

Gardner, Gary “Power to the Pedals.” World Watch, Jul-Aug 2010, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p 6-11. Web. 14 Nov 2013.<http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,cpid&custid=s6246812&db=sch&AN=51593505&site=ehost-live&scope=site

 

This was my second article through Madison College, but it seems to be a dead-end. It talks about the importance of bicycles in the world and the positive effects they  have. It may be useful to cite as part of a brief discussion on why my paper is even relevant to anything in the real-world.

 

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Scooped by Justin Kramer
Scoop.it!

Present Resources List

Justin Kramer's insight:

Resources List:

 

#1

Eley, Daniel. “The Physics of Bicycles” Swanee. n.p. 2006. Web. 10 Nov 2013. <www.sewanee.edu/physics/SEMINARS/Daniel06.ppt‎>

 

This resource contains a powerpoint going over many of the physics of bicycles, and provides a good starting point of what to look at. It looks like it was probably written by a student, and I would want to verify any formulas they came up with. They also list a lot of sources at the end which would be useful to look into.

 

#2

Kooijman, J. D. G. and Schwab, A. L. “Experimental Validation of the Lateral Dynamics of a Bicycle on a Treadmill.” Laboratory for Engineering Mechanics, Delft University of Technology. ASME, 2009. Web. 12 Nov 2013. <http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/schwab/Publications/KooijmanSchwab2009.pdf>;

 

This article deals with the lateral dynamics of a bicycle and its motion on a flat surface compared to on a slanted treadmill. I think it may be useful for writing about a bicycle’s lateral motion and whether inclines affect it or not. It is also a professional paper and appears to carry more credibility, although I’m not sure how useful the article will be as a whole.

 

#3

Fajans , J. “Steering in bicycles and motorcycles.” Department of Physics, University of California. American Association of Physics Teachers, 2000.

 Web. 14 Nov. 2013 <http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~fajans/pub/pdffiles/SteerBikeAJP.PDF>

 

I think this article will be very useful because it deals specifically with steering in bicycles and motorcycles, and steering is one of my main sub-topics. It provides numerous mathematical formulas, detailed descriptions of how they are derived and work, and figures to help illustrate them. It also challenges how much gyroscopic roles play an effect in bicycle turning. I think this article will prove very useful.

 

#4

“Introducing Precession and Gyroscopic Issues” Wayback Machine. Lose the Training Wheels, 2007. Web. 8 Nov 2013. <http://web.archive.org/web/20080213072335/http://www.losethetrainingwheels.org/default.aspx?Lev=2&ID=34>;

 

I had thought gyroscopic forces played a primary role in keeping a bicycle upright, but this article claims they are not necessary at all. This is at odds with what some other physics sites say and is extremely interesting to hear competing viewpoints. It gives an overview of work done at an Illinois university, but also appears to date from the late ‘80s and so future developments may make this information outdated. It could be a dead-end, or a door-opener to more recent research confirming their hypotheses.

 

#5Hess, Ronald and Hubbard, Mont. “Bicycle dynamics, control and handling.” Sports Biomechanics Lab. UC—Davis. Jun 06, 2012. Web. 13 Nov 2013. <http://biosport.ucdavis.edu/research-projects/bicycle> I don’t know how useful this source will be, and appears to be more of a dead-end. It’s a research project that seems to want to take into account the human mass and motion in determining the motion of a bicycle; since the mass of the rider accounts for most of the mass in the human-bicycle-road system, it cannot be neglected and has much bearing on how the bicycle operates. However, there doesn’t seem to be too many conclusions at this point. #6Kooijman, J. D. G., Meijaard, J.P., Papadopoulos, Jim. M, and Schwab, A.L. “A bicycle can be self-stable without gyroscopic or caster effects.” n.p. 14 April, 2011. Web. 14 Nov. 2013. <http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/stablebicycle/StableBicyclev34Revised.pdf> I haven’t been able to track down the original version of this article yet, which appears to have been published in Science Magazine. I think it will be useful in determining how a bicycle stays upright, which appears to be a rather contentious and unresolved problem at this point. It goes in great detail how they did their analysis, and I think their works cited at the end will be useful for further digging. #7“How much effect does the mass of a bicycle tire have on acceleration?” Physics.stackexchange. stack exchange inc., 2011. Web. 14 Nov 2013. <http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/18725/how-much-effect-does-the-mass-of-a-bicycle-tire-have-on-acceleration> This page resource is mainly in a blog-type setting where different users, presumably with knowledge in physics, answered the question of how much effect the bicycle tire mass has on acceleration. There are some useful formulas in here that may be useful, but would need to be corroborated with other sources. It’s not definitive on its own, but appears to be a good start for the mechanics of bicycle acceleration. #8Beck, R.F. “Mountain Bicycle Acceleration and Braking Factors.” Casteel, Beck & Associates, Inc. Proceedings of the Canadian Multidisciplinary Road Safety Conference XIV, 27-30 June 2004. Web. 15 Nov. 2013.<http://www.carsp.ca/uploaded_files/fck/File/CMRSC%20Proceedings/2004_CMRSC_XIV_Ottawa/Papers/7a1.pdf> This resource deals primary with bicycle acceleration (both positive and negative via braking) to help determine the best ways to decrease bicycle accidents. It contains a substantial amount of data and I think it will be useful in discussing bicycle acceleration. It doesn’t contain any explicit formulas, however. #9Jones, David E. H. “The stability of the bicycle.” Physics Today.  Sep. 2006, Vol. 59 Issue 9, p 51-56. Web. 13 Nov 2013.< http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu:2067/ehost/detail?vid=7&sid=d8bad069-6326-4d38-a7c6-9191aab51a32%40sessionmgr115&hid=119&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPWNvb2tpZSxpcCxjcGlkJmN1c3RpZD1zNjI0NjgxMiZzaXRlPWVob3N0LWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=sch&AN=22265400> I located this article through Madison College’s library and it appears to be an excellent resource on the dynamics that go into keeping a bicycle upright. It challenges some of the common perceptions of how a bicycle works and why some explanations are not sufficient. It also appears, from this article and many others, that my topic is a lot more complicated than I had ever originally thought. I think I’ll be able to use this to further my discussion on bicycle stability and motion. #10Gardner, Gary “Power to the Pedals.” World Watch, Jul-Aug 2010, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p 6-11. Web. 14 Nov 2013.< http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu:2067/ehost/detail?vid=10&sid=d8bad069-6326-4d38-a7c6-9191aab51a32%40sessionmgr115&hid=119&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPWNvb2tpZSxpcCxjcGlkJmN1c3RpZD1zNjI0NjgxMiZzaXRlPWVob3N0LWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=sch&AN=51593505> This was my second article through Madison College, but it seems to be a dead-end. It talks about the importance of bicycles in the world and the positive effects they  have. It may be useful to cite as part of a brief discussion on why my paper is even relevant to anything in the real-world.

 

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