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Everyday Workplace Learning: A quick primer | LEARNing To LEARN | ICT | eSkills

Everyday Workplace Learning: A quick primer | LEARNing To LEARN | ICT | eSkills | physics | Scoop.it

Everyday learning is the learning that takes place everyday as individuals do their jobs – individually or working with their internal colleagues, as well as connecting with others in (online) professional networks and channels. It’s about continuously acquiring small pieces of information or skills (often unconsciously) that over time build up into a large body of knowledge or experience, which means an individual becomes proficient in their job and knowledgeable about their industry or profession.

In other words, as the diagram to the left shows, everyday learning happens:

as part of daily working – from a variety of everyday experiences at workas a personal daily learning activity – in whatever way(s) best suits the individual concerned
 
.
Learn more:
.
 

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 13, 2015 12:09 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, October 14, 2015 9:47 AM

Love Jane's take on new ways learning can happen.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, October 19, 2015 4:01 AM

Een nuttige link voor iedereen die bezig is met de lerende school en bij uitbreiding het M-decreet.

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Doctors tell lawmakers medical marijuana is effective - Waterloo Cedar Falls Courier

Doctors tell lawmakers medical marijuana is effective - Waterloo Cedar Falls Courier | physics | Scoop.it
The Gazette: Eastern Iowa Breaking News and Headlines Doctors tell lawmakers medical marijuana is effective Waterloo Cedar Falls Courier Thomas Carlstrom, a retired Des Moines neurosurgeon, told lawmakers Wednesday during a Senate Commerce...
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1984 vs 2014: ‘George Orwell was an optimist’

1984 vs 2014: ‘George Orwell was an optimist’ | physics | Scoop.it
21WIRE + Brasscheck TV | They know they are surveilling innocent people, so what are we going to do about it?

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Genome of 11,000-year-old living dog cancer determined, revealing cancer's origin and evolution

Genome of 11,000-year-old living dog cancer determined, revealing cancer's origin and evolution | physics | Scoop.it

A cancer normally lives and dies with a person, however this is not the case with a sexually transmitted cancer in dogs. In a study published in Science, researchers have described the genome and evolution of this cancer that has continued living within the dog population for the past 11,000 years.


Scientists have sequenced the genome of the world's oldest continuously surviving cancer, a transmissible genital cancer that affects dogs. This cancer, which causes grotesque genital tumors in dogs around the world, first arose in a single dog that lived about 11,000 years ago. The cancer survived after the death of this dog by the transfer of its cancer cells to other dogs during mating.

 

The genome of this 11,000-year-old cancer carries about two million mutations -- many more mutations than are found in most human cancers, the majority of which have between 1,000 and 5,000 mutations. The team used one type of mutation, known to accumulate steadily over time as a "molecular clock," to estimate that the cancer first arose 11,000 years ago.


"The genome of this remarkable long-lived cancer has demonstrated that, given the right conditions, cancers can continue to survive for more than 10,000 years despite the accumulation of millions of mutations," says Dr Elizabeth Murchison, first author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge.

 

The genome of the transmissible dog cancer still harbors the genetic variants of the individual dog that first gave rise to the cancer 11,000 years ago. Analysis of these genetic variants revealed that this dog may have resembled an Alaskan Malamute or Husky. It probably had a short, straight coat that was colored either grey/brown or black. Its genetic sequence could not determine if this dog was a male or a female, but did indicate that it was a relatively inbred individual.

 

"We do not know why this particular individual gave rise to a transmissible cancer," says Dr Murchison, "But it is fascinating to look back in time and reconstruct the identity of this ancient dog whose genome is still alive today in the cells of the cancer that it spawned."

Transmissible dog cancer is a common disease found in dogs around the world today. The genome sequence has helped scientists to further understand how this disease has spread.

 

"The patterns of genetic variants in tumors from different continents suggested that the cancer existed in one isolated population of dogs for most of its history," says Dr Murchison. "It spread around the world within the last 500 years, possibly carried by dogs accompanying seafarers on their global explorations during the dawn of the age of exploration."

 

Transmissible cancers are extremely rare in nature. Cancers, in humans and animals, arise when a single cell in the body acquires mutations that cause it to produce more copies of itself. Cancer cells often spread to different parts of the body in a process known as metastasis. However, it is very rare for cancer cells to leave the bodies of their original hosts and to spread to other individuals. Apart from the dog transmissible cancer, the only other known naturally occurring transmissible cancer is an aggressive transmissible facial cancer in Tasmanian devils that is spread by biting.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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12 new universities join Coursera, now offering more than 100 courses

Coursera has announced that 12 universities — including three international institutions — will be joining Princeton University, Stanford University, University of Michigan, and University of Pennsylvania in offering Coursera classes, according to the Coursera Blog.

 

On Coursera, you will now be able to access world-class courses from:

California Institute of TechnologyDuke UniversityÉcole Polytechnique Federale de LausanneGeorgia Institute of TechnologyJohns Hopkins UniversityPrinceton UniversityRice UniversityStanford UniversityUniversity of California, San FranciscoUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUniversity of MichiganUniversity of PennsylvaniaUniversity of TorontoUniversity of VirginiaUniversity of Washington

You’ll be able to choose from more than 100 courses, from Professor Dan Ariely’s course on irrational behavior, to learning how to program in Scala (taught from the creator of Scala, Professor Martin Odersky from EPFL), to the legendary UVA course “How Things Work” with Professor Louis Bloomfield.

 

You can check out the most current course list here — keep in mind you can enroll in a class even if the start date is TBA.

 

To date, 700,000 students from 190 countries have participated in classes on Coursera, with more than 1.55 million course enrollments total.


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Sieg Holle's curator insight, February 16, 2014 11:26 AM

Your self help program

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Will ultrasound-on-a-chip make medical imaging so cheap that anyone can do it?

Will ultrasound-on-a-chip make medical imaging so cheap that anyone can do it? | physics | Scoop.it

A scanner the size of an iPhone that you could hold up to a person’s chest and see a vivid, moving, 3-D image of what’s inside is being developed by entrepreneur Jonathan Rothberg.


Rothberg says he has raised $100 million to create a medical imaging device that’s nearly “as cheap as a stethoscope” and will “make doctors 100 times as effective.” The technology, which according to patent documents relies on a new kind of ultrasound chip, could eventually lead to new ways to destroy cancer cells with heat, or deliver information to brain cells.


Rothberg has a knack for marrying semiconductor technology to problems in biology. He started and sold two DNA-sequencing companies, 454 and Ion Torrent Systems (see “The $2 Million Genome” and “A Semiconductor DNA Sequencer”), for more than $500 million. The profits have allowed Rothberg, who showed up for an interview wearing worn chinos and a tattered sailor’s belt, to ply the ocean on a 130-foot yacht named Gene Machineand to indulge high-concept hobbies like sequencing the DNA of mathematical geniuses.


The imaging system is being developed by Butterfly Network, a three-year old company that is the furthest advanced of several ventures that Rothberg says will be coming out of 4Combinator, an incubator he has created to start and finance companies that combine medical sensors with a branch of artificial-intelligence science called deep learning.


Rothberg won’t say exactly how Butterfly’s device will work, or what it will look like. “The details will come out when we are on stage selling it. That’s in the next 18 months,” he says. But Rothberg guarantees it will be small, cost a few hundred dollars, connect to a phone, and be able to do things like diagnose breast cancer or visualize a fetus.


Butterfly’s patent applications describe its aim as building compact, versatile new ultrasound scanners that can create 3-D images in real time. Hold it up to a person’s chest, and you would look through “what appears to be a window” into the body, according to the documents.


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OncoDNA's curator insight, November 3, 2014 4:53 PM

A scanner the size of an iPhone that you could hold up to a person’s chest and see a vivid, moving, 3-D image of what’s inside is being developed by entrepreneur Jonathan Rothberg.

Rothberg says he has raised $100 million to create a medical imaging device that’s nearly “as cheap as a stethoscope” and will “make doctors 100 times as effective.” The technology, which according to patent documents relies on a new kind of ultrasound chip, could eventually lead to new ways to destroy cancer cells with heat, or deliver information to brain cells.

Rothberg has a knack for marrying semiconductor technology to problems in biology. He started and sold two DNA-sequencing companies, 454 and Ion Torrent Systems (see “The $2 Million Genome” and “A Semiconductor DNA Sequencer”), for more than $500 million. The profits have allowed Rothberg, who showed up for an interview wearing worn chinos and a tattered sailor’s belt, to ply the ocean on a 130-foot yacht named Gene Machineand to indulge high-concept hobbies like sequencing the DNA of mathematical geniuses.

The imaging system is being developed by Butterfly Network, a three-year old company that is the furthest advanced of several ventures that Rothberg says will be coming out of 4Combinator, an incubator he has created to start and finance companies that combine medical sensors with a branch of artificial-intelligence science called deep learning.

Rothberg won’t say exactly how Butterfly’s device will work, or what it will look like. “The details will come out when we are on stage selling it. That’s in the next 18 months,” he says. But Rothberg guarantees it will be small, cost a few hundred dollars, connect to a phone, and be able to do things like diagnose breast cancer or visualize a fetus.

Butterfly’s patent applications describe its aim as building compact, versatile new ultrasound scanners that can create 3-D images in real time. Hold it up to a person’s chest, and you would look through “what appears to be a window” into the body, according to the documents.

Concept drawings filed with the patent office by Butterfly Network show ideas for a small, 3-D ultrasound imaging device.

With the $100 million supplied by Rothberg and investors, which include Stanford University and Germany’s Aeris Capital, Butterfly appears to be placing the largest bet yet by any company on an emerging technology in which ultrasound emitters are etched directly onto a semiconductor wafer, alongside circuits and processors. The devices are known as “capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducers,” or CMUTs.


[...]

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L'Egypte sur le point de s'offrir quatre Gowind de DCNS pour 1 milliard d'euros (Michel Cabirol- La Tribune)

L'Egypte sur le point de s'offrir quatre Gowind de DCNS pour 1 milliard d'euros (Michel Cabirol- La Tribune) | physics | Scoop.it

C'est un très joli coup pour DCNS à l'exportation... à la grande surprise de beaucoup à Paris. Selon des sources concordantes, le groupe naval dispose d'un accord de principe du Caire pour la vente de quatre corvettes Gowind de 2.400 tonnes (+ 2 options en négociation) armées de missiles surface-air VL Mica et mer-mer Exocet. Un contrat évalué à 1 milliard d'euros hors armement. Une compétition remportée face aux chantiers navals allemand ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), qui proposait des Meko A200, et néerlandais Damen (corvette Sigma). Trois des quatre corvettes Gowind seront fabriquées en Egypte. Pour DCNS, c'est un nouveau succès de la Gowind après celui remporté en Malaisie (6 corvettes).

C'est le ministre de la Défense, le maréchal Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, qui sera candidat à l'élection présidentielle, qui a décidé cette acquisition. C'est aussi un geste fort du Caire vis-à-vis de Paris. L'armée égyptienne avait appelé fin janvier son chef, architecte de la destitution du président islamiste Mohamed Morsi en juillet dernier, à répondre à "l'appel du peuple" en se présentant à l'élection présidentielle. L'homme fort actuel de l'Égypte souhaite avant son départ du ministère boucler un certain nombre de dossiers. C'est d'ailleurs aussi le cas pour l'achat de l'armée égyptienne de neuf avions de transports CASA d'Airbus Group. L'armée de l'air égyptienne (Egypt Air Force) exploite déjà cinq C-295 sur les 12 commandés.

Deux nouveaux sous-marins allemands

L'Égypte aurait également exercé une option pour l'acquisition de deux sous-marins U-209 supplémentaires fabriqués par le groupe naval allemand TKMS. Il s'agit d'une option sur deux nouveaux bâtiments, qui serait exercé par Le Caire dans le cadre du contrat de gré à gré signé à l'été 2011 pour un montant de 920 millions d'euros. Puis un acompte avait été versé quelques mois plus tard en décembre. Le premier sous-marin armé de missiles mer-mer Harpoon Block II de Boeing, serait livré en 2016.

En contrepartie de cette vente au Caire, Berlin a décidé la semaine dernière de lancer la construction du sixième sous-marin Dophin (des U-214 modifiés pour lancer des missiles nucléaires) à Israël. Trois bâtiments ont été déjà livrés tandis que deux autres sont en construction dans le chantier naval allemand de Kiel. Des Dolphin qui confèrent une supériorité opérationnelle et technologique aux Israéliens face aux Égyptiens.



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Open University Lectures (MOOCs)

Academic Earth 
Connexions 
CORE | China Open Resources for Education 
Khan Academy | Complete Lectures Pack 
P2PU | Peer 2 Peer University 
Udemy | Online Courses from World's Experts 

Capilano University 
Capilano University OpenCourseWare 

Carnegie Mellon University 
Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative 
Carnegie Mellon Articles & Databases 
Carnegie Mellon's Channel | YouTube 

Columbia University 
Columbia University's Channel | YouTube 
Earth Institute, Columbia U's Channel | YouTube 

Delft University of Technology 
TU Delft OpenCourseWare 

Gresham College 
Gresham College Free Public Lectures 

Harvard University 
Harvard Open Learning Initiative 
DASH | Opening Harvard Research 
Harvard's Channel | YouTube 
Harvard Extension's Channel | YouTube 

IE University 
IE OpenCourseWare 

India National Programme on Technology Enchanced Learning 
NPTEL E-learning Courses in Engineering and Science 
NPTEL's Channel | YouTube 

Johns Hopkins University 
Johns Hopkins OpenCourseWare 

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals 
KFUPM OpenCourseWare 

Korea University 
Korea University OpenCourseWare 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
MIT OpenCourseWare 
MITx Online Learning Initiative 
MIT's Channel | YouTube 

Middle East Technical University 
METU OpenCourseWare 

New Jersey's Science & Technology University 
NJIT OpenCourseWare 

Novell 
Novell OpenCourseWare 

Pennsylvania State University 
PSU | The College of Earth and Mineral Sciences Open Educational Resources 

Princeton University 
Princeton Archived Lectures 

Purdue University 
Purdue University's Channel | YouTube 

Stanford University 
Stanford Engineering Everywhere (SEE) 
Free Webinars, Seminars, and Lectures 
Stanford's Channel | YouTube 

Taiwan Universities 
Taiwan OpenCourseWare Consortium 

The Open University 
The Open University | OpenLearn 
The Open University's Channel | YouTube 
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The Open University of HK 
The Open University of HK | Open Learning Platform 
The Open University of HK's Channel | YouTube 

Tokyo Institute of Technology 
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Tufts University 
Tufts OpenCourseWare 
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United Nations University 
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UNU's Channel | YouTube 

University of California, Berkeley 
UCBerkeley Webcasts 
UCBerkeley's Channel | YouTube 

University of California, Irvine 
UC Irvine OpenCourseWare 

University of California, San Diego 
UC San Diego Podcasts 

University of Chicago 
UChicago's Channel | YouTube 

University of Massachusetts Boston 
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University of Michigan 
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Open.Michigan's Channel | YouTube 

University of New South Wales 
UNSW eLearning Channel | YouTube 

University of Notre Dame 
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Notre Dame's Channel | YouTube 

University of Nottingham 
U-Now OpenCourseWare 
University of Nottingham's Channel | YouTube 

University of Oxford 
Oxford Podcasts 
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University of Southern Queensland 
USQ OpenCourseWare 

University of Tokyo 
UT OpenCourseWare 

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Utah State University 
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Vanderbilt University 
Vanderbilt University's Channel | YouTube 

Yale University 
Open Yale Courses 
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Wellcome Library: 100,000 Images Released Under Creative Commons Licensing

Wellcome Library: 100,000 Images Released Under Creative Commons Licensing | physics | Scoop.it

"The Wellcome Library recently made more than 100,000 drawings, photographs, paintings, and advertisements available to the world under Creative Commons licensing. The images available through the Wellcome Images library are primarily of a historic nature. You can browse the galleries or search for images by keyword."


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Nacho Vega's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:53 PM

"You can browse the galleries or search for images by keyword."

Solange Giardino's curator insight, March 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Ótimas imagens para usar nas vídeo aulas.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, July 28, 2014 5:46 AM

Buen material y bonitas imágenes! gracias!