Physics
774 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

The world of physics in 2014 - physicsworld.com

The world of physics in 2014 - physicsworld.com | Physics | Scoop.it
Find out more about the key physics events of the coming year – and those we predict might happen
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Community Post: The 12 Days Of Christmas

Community Post: The 12 Days Of Christmas | Physics | Scoop.it
Nature presents its alternative (and science-filled) 12 days of Christmas!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from History of Physics
Scoop.it!

Physics: The Bohr Model

By using quantum theory, Bohr's model improved on the earlier atomic models of British physicists J.J. Thomson (1856–1940) and Ernest Rutherford (1871–1937), which were based on classical (Newtonian) physics.

Via ajlopez
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Exclusive interview with next President of the European Research Council, Jean-Pierre Bourguignon

Mikko Hakala's insight:

French mathematician Bourguignon replaces Helga Nowotny.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Supercooling Experiment 4 - YouTube

In this installment we see supercooled water to -21C / -6F and pour it our into a bowl. It pours out as a liquid and turns to slush, forming ropelike peaks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Special issue on frontiers of free-electron laser science: Journal of Physics B, Volume 46, Number 16, 28 August 2013 - IOPscience

Table of contents of issue 16 in volume 46 of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics.
Mikko Hakala's insight:

34 papers on FEL science: Instrumentation, Theory, SCSS, SACLA, FLASH, LCLS experiments. Free to read for 2 more weeks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Heating Water To 600 Degrees Celsius In One Trillionth Of A Second

Heating Water To 600 Degrees Celsius In One Trillionth Of A Second | Physics | Scoop.it
A new trick of science could trigger some interesting chemical reactions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Why is fundamental science important? - physicsworld.com

Why is fundamental science important? - physicsworld.com | Physics | Scoop.it
John Dainton on why academic freedom benefits society
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Cellulose nanocrystals possible 'green' wonder material

Cellulose nanocrystals possible 'green' wonder material | Physics | Scoop.it
The same tiny cellulose crystals that give trees and plants their high strength, light weight and resilience, have now been shown to have the stiffness of steel.
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Mechanical properties by DFT + semiempirical vdW.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from Kirjastoista, oppimisesta ja oppimisen ympäristöistä
Scoop.it!

A Scientist Predicts the Future

A Scientist Predicts the Future | Physics | Scoop.it

"When making predictions, I have two criteria: the laws of physics must be obeyed and prototypes must exist that demonstrate “proof of principle.” I’ve interviewed more than 300 of the world’s top scientists, and many allowed me into laboratories where they are inventing the future. Their accomplishments and dreams are eye-opening."


Via Anu Ojaranta
Mikko Hakala's insight:

"...to grasp the importance of science and science education. Science is the engine of prosperity."

more...
Anu Ojaranta's curator insight, December 27, 2013 7:55 AM

The computers as we know will disappear, augmentet reality will be everyday reality, intellectual capitalism will replace commodity capitalism...

Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Smoother-than-expected electrons could mean rethinking particle physics | ExtremeTech

Smoother-than-expected electrons could mean rethinking particle physics | ExtremeTech | Physics | Scoop.it
The shape of electrons could mean a big headache for physicists who have been hoping supersymmetry would fill in the gaps of the standard model.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Direct measurements of the wave nature of matter

Direct measurements of the wave nature of matter | Physics | Scoop.it
New experimental techniques map out wave properties only known previously from theory.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from Nuclear Physics
Scoop.it!

Radiation Physicist Beautifully Colorizes X-Ray Images of Nature

Radiation Physicist Beautifully Colorizes X-Ray Images of Nature | Physics | Scoop.it
Hanging Begonia, Chameleon
In late October, at the TEDx event in Groningen, Netherlands, one man stood on the stage and gave a fascinating talk about how his…

Via Theo J. Mertzimekis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Van der Waals heterostructures : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Van der Waals heterostructures : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | Physics | Scoop.it
Research on graphene and other two-dimensional atomic crystals is intense and is likely to remain one of the leading topics in condensed matter physics and materials science for many years.
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Perspective on VdW heterostructures as an emerging research area.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Uranium Oxidation State Finally Revealed

Uranium Oxidation State Finally Revealed | Physics | Scoop.it
X-ray spectroscopy has revealed the first direct evidence for a particular oxidation state of uranium in two types of uranium oxide.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

X-rays reveal high-temperature superconductivity is caused by a mechanism distinct from the classical variety

X-rays reveal high-temperature superconductivity is caused by a mechanism distinct from the classical variety | Physics | Scoop.it
Classical and high-temperature superconductors differ hugely in their critical temperature when they lose electrical resistance.

 

Scientists have now used powerful X-rays to establish another big difference: high-temperature superconductivity cannot be accounted for by the mechanism that leads to conventional superconductivity. As this mechanism called "electron-phonon coupling" contributes only marginally to the loss of electrical resistance, other scenarios must now be developed to explain high-temperature superconductivity. The results are published on 24 November 2013 in Nature Physics.

 

The team of scientists was led by Mathieu Le Tacon and Bernhard Keimer from the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart (Germany) and comprised scientists from Politecnico di Milano (Italy), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the European Synchrotron (ESRF) in Grenoble, France.

 

High-temperature superconductivity was discovered nearly thirty years ago and is beginning to find more and more practical applications. These materials have fascinated scientists since their discovery. For even more practical applications, the origin of their amazing properties must be understood, and ways found to calculate the critical temperature. A key element of this understanding is the process that makes electrons combine into so-called "Cooper pairs" when the material is cooled below the critical temperature. In classical superconductors, these Cooper pairs are formed thanks to electron-phonon coupling, an interaction between electrons carrying the electrical current and collective vibrations of atoms in the material.

 

To understand the role this interaction plays in high-temperature superconductors, Matthieu Le Tacon and his colleagues took up the challenge to study these atomic vibrations as the material was cooled down below its critical temperature. "Studying electron-phonon coupling in these superconductors is always a delicate task, due to the complex structure of the materials," says Alexeï Bosak, an ESRF scientist and member of the team. He adds: "This is why we developed a two-level approach to literally find a needle in the hay stack".

 

The big surprise came once the electron-phonon coupling had been probed. "In terms of its amplitude, the coupling is actually by far the biggest ever observed in a superconductor, but it occurs in a very narrow region of phonon wavelengths and at a very low energy of vibration of the atoms", adds Mathieu Le Tacon. "This explains why nobody could see it before the two-level approach of X-ray scattering was developed".

 

Because the electron-phonon coupling is in such a narrow wavelength region, it cannot "help" two electrons to bind themselves together into a Cooper pair. The next step will be to make systematic observations in many other high-temperature superconductors. "Although we now know that electron-phonon coupling does not contribute to their superconductivity, the unexpected size of the effect—we call it giant electron-phonon-coupling—happens to be a valuable tool to study the interplay between superconductivity and other competing processes. This will hopefully provide further insight into the origin of high-temperature superconductivity, still one of the big mysteries of science", concludes Mathieu Le Tacon.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from PhysicsLearn
Scoop.it!

Gliding High: Designing Paper Airplanes Based on the Physics of Flight

Gliding High: Designing Paper Airplanes Based on the Physics of Flight | Physics | Scoop.it
In this lesson, students design, build, test and modify paper airplanes based on the physics of flight and inspired by a Times article about the Perlan Project.

Via Dolores Gende
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mikko Hakala
Scoop.it!

Crystal film growth: Nanosheets extend epitaxial growth applications

Crystal film growth: Nanosheets extend epitaxial growth applications | Physics | Scoop.it
Molecularly thin two-dimensional crystals can alleviate the lattice matching restrictions of epitaxial crystalline thin film growth, as reported by researchers in Japan.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from Leadership Think Tank
Scoop.it!

Top YouTube Channels for Science and Math Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Top YouTube Channels for Science and Math Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Physics | Scoop.it

Via Educatorstechnology, Aki Puustinen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mikko Hakala from Nuclear Physics
Scoop.it!

What are the big unanswered questions in nuclear physics? - physicsworld.com

What are the big unanswered questions in nuclear physics? - physicsworld.com | Physics | Scoop.it
Peter Butler on why there is still so much to learn about matter in the universe

Via Theo J. Mertzimekis
more...
No comment yet.