Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process
20 views | +2 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from Project Virtual Tumor Cancer in silico and Alternative Cancer Therapies
Scoop.it!

Electric field therapy could stop tumor growth in brain cancer

Brain tumors are usually treated with an intense course of cancer’s Big Three: Surgery, radiation and heavy chemotherapy. Medical device startup Novocure is adding a new treatment option into the mix: Electrofield therapy, in which alternating electric fields shut down cellular division – curbing the growth of cancer. It’s called Optune.

And it seems to be wildly successful. Novocure just announced it’s ending a Phase III trial in newly diagnosed brain cancer patients early, extending the electric field therapy to controls and treated subjects alike. The patients’ lives were extended by about three months on average, a meaningful window of time with such fast-acting cancers.

CEO Bill Doyle describes, in the 2012 TEDMED talk seen above, Novocure’s Phase III results at the time in brain cancer. But here’s how it works:

The company uses low intensity electric fields that disrupt cellular replication. These tumor-treating fields, shortened to TTFields, exert actual physical force on the charged parts of cells, stopping processes like the formation of the mitotic spindle, and actually killing the cells themselves before they divide. See a descriptive video here.

After two days, the company says, cancer cells proliferate in the control sample – but in the treatment sample, the only cells surviving are those who didn’t attempt to divide.

The device is highly portable – it sits in a backpack that patients can carry around as they c their day-to-day activities, receiving constant electrotherapy over the course of two days. For the brain cancers, it can be worn, hat-like, on a patient’s head.

The six-year-old company has operations in New Hampshire, Israel, Jersey and Switzerland. Investors include Johnson & Johnson Development Corp., Index Ventures, WFD Ventures, Pfizer Ventures and Medtronic.

The TTField therapies are in the midst of clinical trials in four cancers – glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly brain cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, ovarian carcinoma and brain metastasis for non-small cell carcinoma.

It’s received FDA clearance for recurrent glioblastomas in adults, and has launched commercially in Europe.


Via Miguel Martín-Landrove
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Psiconeuroinmunología, Dra. Marianela Castés. Cáncer desde la Psiconeuroinmunología - YouTube

Este canal permite revisar y escuchar el contenido de mi taller sobre Psiconeuroinmunología o PNI. Este es un tema de sumo interés para la sociedad, por el i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Subatomic Physics in Your Medicine Cabinet - PhysicsCentral.com (blog)

Subatomic Physics in Your Medicine Cabinet
PhysicsCentral.com (blog)
Scientists in Berlin have just cracked the case on a recently-raised question about one of the world's most popular medicines: aspirin.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Nanometre-scale gold particles are intensively investigated for application as catalysts, sensors, drug delivery devices, biological contrast agents and components in photonics and molecular electronics.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Yes, Flexible Hours Ease Stress. But Is Everyone on Board?

Yes, Flexible Hours Ease Stress. But Is Everyone on Board? | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it

Everyone with a job knows how stressful it can be when personal priorities clash with work schedules. The conflict could involve a continuing medical concern, taking care of children or aging parents, or getting enough exercise or running errands. A too-strict schedule combined with too many demands can cause workers to feel that they have let down their companies, their families and themselves.

 

A recent study, published in The American Sociological Review, aimed to see whether the stress of work-life conflicts could be eased if employees had more control over their schedules, including being able to work from home. As might be expected, the answer was yes — but before everyone deserts their desks, some important caveats bear consideration.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 24, 2014 4:51 AM

A study shows that working from home can make you happier. Face time at the office, however, has value, too.

Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Drug pruning extra synapses in brain can treat autism – study - RT

Drug pruning extra synapses in brain can treat autism – study - RT | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
RT
Drug pruning extra synapses in brain can treat autism – study
RT
Autistic children have an excessive amount of synapses, or brain connections between neurons, which doesn't alter as it should with age, US scientists have revealed.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from e.cloud
Scoop.it!

Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue

Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months.

 


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET, Alessio Erioli
more...
Alessio Erioli's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:36 AM

add your insight...

Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain

Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number manyfold.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Warning over electrical brain stimulation

Warning over electrical brain stimulation | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Research suggests that non-invasive brain stimulation could improve cognitive function. But now some companies are selling such devices online which has led for calls to regulate the technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Haven't my neurons seen this before? What happens in the brain with familiar pictures?

Haven't my neurons seen this before? What happens in the brain with familiar pictures? | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

It's not Rocket Science, but it is Neuroscience

It's not Rocket Science, but it is Neuroscience | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
RT @haydnnorthover: It's not Rocket Science, but it is Neuroscience http://t.co/GAwS53ZIAY via @sharethis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain

Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from Project Virtual Tumor Cancer in silico and Alternative Cancer Therapies
Scoop.it!

Breath test that tells you if you have lung cancer

Breath test that tells you if you have lung cancer | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it

By Rebecca Burn-Callander

 

Scientists can now detect early-stage lung cancer before any symptoms develop, using a new British invention.

A new breathalyser, which has been likened to a Star Trek "Tricorder" by its inventors, can identify the chemicals produced by cancer in a patient's breath.

The system uses a nanochip, which is the size of a 5p piece, to detect the signs of lung cancer, making this device the smallest, most portable and most effective testing system available.

The invention was developed by University of Cambridge researchers Billy Boyle, Andrew Koehl and David Ruiz-Alonso. Owlstone Nanotech, a spin-out from the university, is now working with clinical researchers to develop the product.

"Think of it as an electronic nose," Mr Boyle, president of Owlstone, told the Telegraph. "It's like a sniffer dog on a mobile phone. We can test people with no symptoms - they aren't coughing, there's no blood - and catch the disease at a stage where it makes a huge difference."

Around 44,000 people are diagnosed with lung cancer in the UK each year. Some 85pc of lung cancer diagnoses take place after stage one, making the disease much more difficult to treat.

However, if caught early, there is a 71pc chance of survival. "Only 14.5pc of people are ever diagnosed that early," said Mr Boyle. "We want to drive up that number."

Owlstone is currently in talks with the NHS to roll out the device across GP surgeries in the UK. At-risk groups, such as smokers aged 50 and over, could be routinely tested.

According to Mr Boyle, a national screening programme, like the current breast cancer testing system, could also be introduced.

"We've had some hugely positive feedback from the NHS," he said. "We're looking at a per test, per patient cost of between £10 and £15, which represents a huge cost-saving - it's 100 times cheaper than current detection methods."

The first devices will be introduced into clinics by September next year, he said. A product will be ready for use nationwide by 2017.

Owlstone was first launched 10 years ago, and began producing devices for the defence industry. Mr Boyle's first invention was a gadget for soldiers, which detected deadly chemicals in the air. The company has won contracts with the US Department of Defence worth more than $10m.

Owlstone is currently looking to raise $3m to $5m in investment to bring the new application for this technology to market. It is working with MedCity, which works to promote life sciences entrepreneurship in the London-Oxford-Cambridge region, to find backers and clinics willing to help develop new applications for the product.

"We could use this chip to find colon cancer, by studying the chemicals in a urine sample," said Mr Boyle. "We could also look at infectious diseases like tuberculosis.

"This product is revolutionary."


Via Miguel Martín-Landrove
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Cancer Cells Adapt Energy Needs to Spread Illness to Other Organs | MD Anderson Cancer Center

Cancer Cells Adapt Energy Needs to Spread Illness to Other Organs | MD Anderson Cancer Center | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Scientists at MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that cancer cells traveling to other sites have different energy needs from their “stay-at-home” siblings which continue to proliferate at the original tumor site.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

PET Imaging Systems Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth ... - Broadway World

PET Imaging Systems Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth ... - Broadway World | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
PET Imaging Systems Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Indian Scientist uses new approach to find 'hidden' genetic causes of brain disorders | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Indian Scientist uses new approach to find 'hidden' genetic causes of brain disorders | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Indian Scientist uses new approach to find 'hidden' genetic causes of brain disorders - Indian scientist Dr.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Innovation in imaging: MRI technology experiences rapid advances - nwitimes.com

Innovation in imaging: MRI technology experiences rapid advances - nwitimes.com | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Innovation in imaging: MRI technology experiences rapid advances
nwitimes.com
MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. The machines use a magnetic field and radio waves to form detailed pictures of the inside of people's bodies.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Can Overthinking Reduce a Leader's Influence?

Can Overthinking Reduce a Leader's Influence? | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it

We've all seen this: The CEO who acts instinctively, sometimes with terrible results, keeps his or her job and even develops a loyal following. Meanwhile, the thinker in the executive suite who consistently offers the right, deliberated answer rarely gets a promotion.

Researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Business set out to answer the question of whether we sometimes penalize thoughtfulness — not in ourselves, but when we see it in others.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:35 AM

Well, rest the common sense of the right balance... all attempts to break into actionable pieces what is in the very actual situation is impossible are futile... sometimes intuition is better than too much thinking and sometimes intuition puts things astray...it's a bit mote complicated than "less thinking & moreintuition"" (see books like "Think twice",  "Think again" or Kahneman's...)...

 

Of course and it' an interesting aspect that the  staff is how influenced by how the decision is made... decisions might be powerful  and  with full of confidence made by either by more thinking by more by intuition, the essence is the  congruity, the authenticity of those making it and the transparence of the process...

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:54 AM

I guess it is time we realised that overthinking and overanalyzing do not give good returns after all! The ideal CEO is a person who can handle various tasks without getting bogged down by a single task due to over thinking. However, there are many of us who become obsessed with somehow getting to the rooot of a particular problem without realising that we are neglecting other tasks!

Dan Forbes's curator insight, August 25, 2014 7:46 AM

Let me think about this....

Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Yoga Shown to Boost Brain Power in Older Adults - PsychCentral.com

PsychCentral.com Yoga Shown to Boost Brain Power in Older Adults PsychCentral.com Sedentary older adults who began practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks experienced a boost in working memory, according to a new study by the...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joselen Pena from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
Scoop.it!

Children with autism 'have too many synapses in their brain'

Children with autism 'have too many synapses in their brain' | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center in New York, NY, find that children with autism have excess synapses in their brain, which impacts brain function.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

How the Brain Creates a Dependence On Opioids - PsychCentral.com (blog)

How the Brain Creates a Dependence On Opioids - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
PsychCentral.com (blog) How the Brain Creates a Dependence On Opioids PsychCentral.com (blog) How The Brain Creates A Dependence On Opioids Opioids have been around for a very long time, and are used as painkillers to help patients cope with pain...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

Math reorganizes kids' brains - Albuquerque Journal

Math reorganizes kids' brains - Albuquerque Journal | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Sci-Tech Today
Math reorganizes kids' brains
Albuquerque Journal
Now scientists have put youngsters into brain scanners to find out why, and watched how the brain reorganizes itself as kids learn math.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

How Things Work: Neuroscience studies explain why humans experience empathy - CMU The Tartan Online

How Things Work: Neuroscience studies explain why humans experience empathy - CMU The Tartan Online | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
How Things Work: Neuroscience studies explain why humans experience empathy
CMU The Tartan Online
Like everything in our universe, humans are fundamentally a collection of molecules interacting with each other.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joselen Pena
Scoop.it!

How Neuroscience Can Inform Consumer Research

How Neuroscience Can Inform Consumer Research | Physics+neuroscience+cancer+imaging process | Scoop.it
Recently, a rapidly growing approach within consumer research has developed under the label of ldquoconsumer neuroscience.rdquo Its goal is to use insights and methods from neuroscience to enhance the understanding of consumer behavior.
more...
No comment yet.