Physical therapy
319 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bronson Ingland
Scoop.it!

The Heel Whip: a runner's worst nightmare. | corrective exercise, injury, injury prevention, pain

Profound Stregth strives to provide you with simplified information on fitness, nutrition, living healthy, injury prevention and exercising pain free.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bronson Ingland
Scoop.it!

Dynamic Genu Valgus in the Female Athlete

Dynamic Genu Valgus in the Female Athlete | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
According to a study by Arendt (1995), females are between two to eight times more likely to injure their ACL than their male counterpart in similar sporting events.  Typically the injury occurs in...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Crossfit
Scoop.it!

Is CrossFit Killing Us? - Outside Magazine

Is CrossFit Killing Us? - Outside Magazine | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

IN JULY, nearly 300,000 people tuned in live on ESPN2 to watch 26-year-old Rich Froning and 31-year-old Samantha Briggs win the Reebok CrossFit Games, the last two standing after out-muscling 138,000 global participants in three rounds of competition. For their efforts, which included CrossFit mainstays like burpees and deadlifts, Froning and Briggs walked away with $250,000 each and the title Fittest on Earth—at least according to CrossFit.

Buoyed by the games, CrossFit's high-intensity workouts have exploded in popularity. There are now roughly 10,000 CrossFit-branded affiliate gyms—or boxes, as they're called—around the world. But behind the competitive, puke-inducing workouts is a growing list of injured participants, many of whom suffer from telltale injuries: slipped disks, torn rotator cuffs, knee tendinopathy. Neither the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) nor any other association tracks injury rates, but Robert Hayden, a Georgia chiropractor and spokesman for the American Chiropractic Association, says he has noticed a rise in CrossFit patients over the past two years. "Among my colleagues, we often share the anecdotal observation that CrossFit is good for our practices," says Hayden.

Blame the nature of the training. Most Workout of the Day routines (WODs, as CrossFit disciples refer to them) include Olympic lifts like squats and power cleans, which require near perfect form to prevent undue strain. Newbies rarely have the stamina or guidance to maintain that form. Combine that with the high number of reps and it's a recipe for injury.

"If you have a preexisting condition—an old ACL tear, tendon damage, or a slipped disk—this kind of exercise will bring it to the surface," says Hayden.

This isn't the first time CrossFit has been in the injury spotlight. Early on, it earned a reputation for being so intense that it could induce rhabdomyolysis, a potentially fatal condition in which muscle tissue breaks down and is released into the bloodstream. But this time the focus is on musculoskeletal issues. This summer, the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research published a study showing eye-popping fitness gains among CrossFitters, with participants in a ten-week program boosting their VO2 max by roughly four points. But the study also revealed a troubling statistic: 16 percent of the 54 participants had quit the program due to "overuse or injury." In 2011, the U.S. military, in conjunction with the ACSM, advised soldiers to avoid CrossFit, citing "disproportionate musculo-skeletal injury risk."

In both cases, CrossFit representatives waged a counteroffensive. Reacting to the military findings, CrossFit's chief scientist, Jeff Glassman—father of CrossFit founder Greg Glassman—wrote a 92-page rebuttal that attributed the rise in injuries in part to fatigue from the war on terror.

In CrossFit's defense, the organization goes out of its way to warn people that if they can't maintain proper technique, they should back off. But backing off is a hard sell for many participants, who view the workouts as a competition, especially now that the CrossFit Games are so popular—participation is up more than 400 percent since 2011.


Via Myboxlive
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Doctor
Scoop.it!

Clear.md: using video to harness physician expertise

Clear.md: using video to harness physician expertise | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

Bryan Vartabedian, MD (@Doctor_V) writes:

 

'A while back I suggested that it would be amazing if we could harness just some of doctors know. If we could record and repurpose their wisdom and stories it would represent a key resource for students and patients. It turns out there’s a company looking to tap that physician mindshare one short video at a time. It’s Clear.md, a Minnesota-based startup with a platform that allows doctors to self-create short, focused videos for patient education.

 

What’s remarkable is that every doctor’s video has the same, branded Clear.md background: white. This is achieved through the use of a small kit that participating doctors receive from Clear.md. It consists of a pop up green screen, a tripod and an adaptor for the iPad 3 or iPhone 4S. Within minutes a doc can be up hammering out pithy posts for patient consumption. Once live, these videos sit on a unique Clear.md page customized for the doctor or the participating institution.

 

Think of this as a spot for doctors to capture their expertise for people. A place for doctors to meet patients online. All this makes perfect sense. People love auditioning a doctor by video. Have a peek at Howard Luks explaining how the rotator cuff is like an old pair of blue jeans. These are precisely the types of analogies I use in the clinical setting.'


Via Andrew Spong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Sports medicine and physiotherapy
Scoop.it!

Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears: Just because we have a scalpel... - Howard J. Luks, MD

Surgery for Rotator Cuff Tears: Just because we have a scalpel... - Howard J. Luks, MD | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Over the last few years there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients being operated on for rotator cuff tears. Let's explore this further.

Via sportEX
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bronson Ingland
Scoop.it!

Surgery Not Needed for Rotator Cuff Tears

Surgery Not Needed for Rotator Cuff Tears | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Most rotator cuff tears never need surgery. The vast majority of rotator cuff tears never even cause symptoms. When a rotator cuff tear does cause symptoms, surgery can be considered as a treatment option.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
Scoop.it!

Intermittent Fasting Raises HGH 1300% - 2000%

Link to article: http://drjones.tv/topics/increase-hgh-1300-2000-through-intermittent-fasting/

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Crossfit
Scoop.it!

5 Things You Should Do Everyday

5 Things You Should Do Everyday | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

In 1970, the average United States citizen spent $356 on healthcare. This figure rose to $8,402 by 2010.  When ranked as a percentage of GDP, healthcare costs were 7.2% in 1970 and 18% in 2010 (1). As you can see, healthcare costs have risen tremendously over the years. It is therefore in all or our financial best interests to take care of our bodies. Here are five such things that you should probably do every single day; things that will help you maintain proper functioning and prevent costly medical expenses later on in life.

Deep Squat

Why it’s a good idea:  The deep squat will help you maintain your hip flexion mobility (a technical way of saying that you’ll retain the ability to squat all the way down) throughout life. The deep squat is performed much more commonly in many Asian and Middle East countries and requires 95-130 degrees of hip flexion and 110-165 degrees of knee flexion (which is a lot of range of motion) (2,3). If you use this ability, you’ll keep it. If you don’t, however, you’ll lose it. Dr. Stuart McGill started performing this drill daily and credits it for helping him retain his hip function and prevent hip replacement surgery (4). If you’re a lifter, you want to retain your deep squat ability, as it’s been shown to lead to greater vertical jump transfer, quadricep and hamstring hypertrophy, glute activation, hip extension torque, postactivation potentiation, and deep squat strength compared to shallower squatting (5-10).

What to do: You don’t want to use extra loading on this drill, so no dumbbells, kettlebells, or barbells. Just squat all the way down as deep as you can go with your own body weight and remain flat-footed (don’t come up onto the toes). Now, with loaded squatting, it’s imperative that you prevent the lumbar spine from excessive rounding. But with the bodyweight deep squat, it’s okay to relax and let the spine sink down into the stretch. Hang out in the deep squat position for 30 seconds then rise back up. Just do this one time. 

 

READ MORE: http://bretcontreras.com/5-things-you-should-do-everyday/


Via Myboxlive
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from The 5 Chambers Of Fitness
Scoop.it!

HEAVY DUTY TRAINING: The Mike Mentzer Way. #Fitness #Strength

HEAVY DUTY TRAINING:  The Mike Mentzer Way.  #Fitness #Strength | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

Excerpt:

 

Mike Mentzer (November 15, 1951 – June 10, 2001) was an American IFBB professional bodybuilder, businessman, philosopher and author.

 

Bodybuilding philosophy

 

Mentzer was an Objectivist and he insisted that philosophy and bodybuilding are one and the same. He said "Man, is an indivisible entity, an integrated unit of mind and body." Thus, his books contain as much philosophy as they do bodybuilding information

 

Mentzer took the bodybuilding concepts developed by Arthur Jones and attempted to perfect them. Through years of study, observation, knowledge of stress physiology, the most up-to-date scientific information available, and careful use of his reasoning abilities, Mentzer devised and successfully implemented his own theory of bodybuilding. Mentzer's theories are intended to help a drug-free person achieve their full genetic potential within the shortest amount of time

 

Diet and nutrition

 

Mentzer believed that Carbohydrates should make up the bulk of the caloric intake, 50-60%, rather than protein as preferred by others. Mentzer's reasoning was simple: to build 10 pounds of muscle in a year, a total of 6000 extra calories needed to be ingested throughout the year, because one pound of muscle contains 600 calories. That averages 16 extra calories per day, and only four of them needed to be from protein—because muscle is 22% protein, about one quarter.

 

Mentzer's heavy-duty training system

 

While Mike Mentzer was serving in the US Air Force, he would work 12-hour shifts, and then follow that up with 'marathon workouts', as was the accepted standard in those days. In his first bodybuilding contest, he met the winner, Casey Viator. Mentzer learned that Viator trained in very high intensity (heavy weights for as many repetitions as possible, to total muscle fatigue), for very brief (20–45 minutes per session) and infrequent training sessions. Mentzer also learned that Viator almost exclusively worked out with the relatively new Nautilus machines, created and marketed by Arthur Jones in Deland, Florida. Mentzer and Jones soon met and became friends.

 

Jones pioneered the principles of high-intensity training in the late 1960s. He emphasized the need to maintain perfectly strict form, move the weights in a slow and controlled manner, work the muscles to complete failure (positive and negative), and avoid over-training.

 

 Eventually, however, Mentzer concluded that even Jones was not completely applying his own principles, so he began investigating a more full application. He began training clients in a near experimental manner, evaluating the perfect number of repetitions, exercises, and days of rest to achieve maximum benefits.

 

For more than ten years, Mentzer's Heavy Duty program involved 7-9 sets per workout on a three day-per-week schedule. With the advent of "modern bodybuilding" (where bodybuilders became more massive than ever before) by the early 1990s, he ultimately modified that routine until there were fewer working sets, and more days of rest.

 

His first breakthrough became known as the 'Ideal (Principled) Routine', which was a fantastic step in minimal training. Outlined in High-Intensity Training the Mike Mentzer Way, fewer than five working sets were performed each session, and rest was emphasized, necessitating 4–7 days of recovery before the next workout.

 

According to Mentzer, biologists and physiologists since the nineteenth century have known that hypertrophyis directly related to intensity, not duration, of effort (Mentzer 2003;39). Most bodybuilding and weightlifting authorities do not take into account the severe nature of the stress imposed by heavy, strenuous resistance exercise carried to a point of positive muscular failure.

 

Mentzer's training courses (books and audio tapes), sold through bodybuilding magazines, were extremely popular, beginning after Mentzer won the 1978 IFBB Mr. Universe contest. This contest gathered a lot of attention, because at it he became the first bodybuilder ever to receive a perfect 300 score from the judges. Some time later, Mentzer attracted more attention when he introducedDorian Yates to high-intensity training, and put him through his first series of workouts in the early '90s.[2] Yates went on to win the Mr. Olympia six consecutive times, from 1992–1997.

 

Mentzer's training courses (books and audio tapes), sold through bodybuilding magazines, were extremely popular, beginning after Mentzer won the 1978 IFBB Mr. Universe contest. This contest gathered a lot of attention, because at it he became the first bodybuilder ever to receive a perfect 300 score from the judges. Some time later, Mentzer attracted more attention when he introducedDorian Yates to high-intensity training, and put him through his first series of workouts in the early '90s.[2] Yates went on to win the Mr. Olympia six consecutive times, from 1992–1997.

 

Read Full Article: http://bit.ly/18Zfd7V


Via The New Media Moguls
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from The 5 Chambers Of Fitness
Scoop.it!

#FITNESS #HEALTH -Dissimilar Effects of One- and Three-Set #Strength Training

"The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of single- and multiple-set strength training on hypertrophy and strength gains in untrained men. Twenty-one young men were randomly assigned to either the 3L-1UB group (trained 3 sets in leg exercises and 1 set in upper-body exercises; n = 11), or the 1L-3UB (trained 1 set in leg exercises and 3 sets in upper-body exercises; n = 10). Subjects trained 3 days per week for 11 weeks and each workout consisted of 3 leg exercises and 5 upper-body exercises. Training intensity varied between 10 repetition maximum (RM) and 7RM." http://bit.ly/1aY8M8R.

Via The New Media Moguls
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Longevity
Scoop.it!

Elderly exercisers have fewer broken bones after falls

Elderly exercisers have fewer broken bones after falls | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

Older adults who exercise are less likely to fall, but if they do, they're also less likely to get hurt, a new analysis suggests.

 

Researchers found that older adults taking part in fall prevention exercise programs were about 37 percent less likely to be injured during a tumble, compared to non-exercising participants.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's , Oliver
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Healthy Aging
Scoop.it!

Is Your Home a Safe Haven? Preventing Elderly Falls.

Is Your Home a Safe Haven? Preventing Elderly Falls. | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

"Seniors are five times more likely to be hospitalized because of fall-related injuries than all other injuries / causes combined. Here's a few simple adjustments that can make a huge difference to ensure their home is a safe haven." Provided By: Cardinal Senior Care


Via ElderOptionsofTexas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from AGING - The Four Letter Word
Scoop.it!

Lessons learned from analyzing fall prevention programs

Lessons learned from analyzing fall prevention programs | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Falls in the elderly can be a devastating event.

Via Heather M Pound
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bronson Ingland
Scoop.it!

AAOMPT 2013: The Keynote Synopsis

AAOMPT 2013: The Keynote Synopsis | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Friday’s AAOMPT conference started off very strong with a keynote lecture by Ali Rushton.  Ali discussed the topic of the subjective examination. She began her talk by discussing clinical reasoning...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bronson Ingland
Scoop.it!

Assessing and Treating Dysfunction of the Gluteus Medius - Mike Reinold

Tweet Tweet The October 2008 issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning has an impressive review article of the anatomy, function, assessment, and strengthening of the gluteus medius from a group of clinicians in New Zealand.  The authors do...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Crossfit
Scoop.it!

The Top Ten Mistakes CrossFitters Make

The Top Ten Mistakes CrossFitters Make | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

1. Not Warming Up Properly

 

[I]t’s imperative to put in the time for an adequate warm-up and mobility work. If you don’t put in the time now you’ll put it in later when you have an injury.

Every day it takes me around 30 minutes to warm-up. I start with easy cardio for 5-10 min. then do some light foam rolling and stretching, leg swings, lunges, rotator cuff exercises, and finally movements specific to the workout I’m about to do.

My warm-up has gotten more extensive (and longer) with each year I do CrossFit. Almost to the point that it started to annoy me, and then I remembered back to my gymnastics days: Ever since I was on team at age 8, I remember our warm-ups taking us at least 30 minutes with all of the stretching and other calisthenics we did.

Even though we were young and healthy I believe the gymnastics coaches knew what they were doing to keep us that way. With the intensity of competitive CrossFit, it’s imperative to put in the time for an adequate warm-up and mobility work. If you don’t put in the time now you’ll put it in later when you have an injury.

Read 3 Reasons Why You Need a Proper Warm-up.

2. Eating Too Strict of a Paleo Diet

If you are a recreational CrossFitter, following a Paleo lifestyle is probably nutritionally adequate and a good way of maintaining longevity and health. However, if you are a competitive-level athlete and training intensely more than an hour a day, your main source of energy is carbohydrates, and strict Paleo simply does not provide enough sources of them.

Now I’m not saying to go out and carb-load on pasta, bread, or sugar. That’s just an inflammatory insulin bomb. I am saying look for complex sources of carbohydrates from plants and low glycemic grains to add into your diet, especially when training is at its peak.

During an interview at the Games, every individual athlete was asked who follows a Paleo diet, and not a single one raised their hand.

3. Sacrificing Technique and Movement Efficiency for Intensity and Eventual Technical Breakdown


CrossFit gets results due to the intensity of the workouts, but that doesn’t mean throw all good form out the window. For example, if your back starts rounding when you’re pulling from the ground or you’re chasing wildly after snatches, it’s time to put the bar down until you can regain efficiency. Your back and other body parts will thank you later!

Also if you’re compromising range of motion enough to miss consecutive reps, take a quick rest before you go again. Otherwise you are ingraining poor habits and when you reach that place of pain and fatigue again in competition guess what’ll happen… No Rep!

4. Doing Volume for Volume’s Sake Without IntentHave a purpose! More is not better; better is better.

CrossFitters are notorious for thinking that when they are getting ready to compete, more is better. This mindset leads to the performance of multiple hero WODs in a day with the intent of “loading,” when what it really does is break the athlete down with laborious repetition and impede lasting gains.

More is not better; better is better. Having a purpose, i.e. knowing the energy system and muscular groups you’re trying to tax during a workout allows you to work smart and hard, not just hard. Again, your body will also thank you later!

Read Understanding How To Use Extra Workouts.

 

Read More...

 


Via Myboxlive
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Sports medicine and physiotherapy
Scoop.it!

Effectiveness of physical therapy in treating atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears

Effectiveness of physical therapy in treating atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

This study investigates the effectiveness of a specific nonoperative physical therapy program in treating atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff.  


Via sportEX
more...
FitOldDog's curator insight, March 3, 2014 8:07 AM

This is a tough one. Turns out that hand angle in the pool is important, amongst other things.

Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Sports medicine and physiotherapy
Scoop.it!

Regional Interdependence - Thinking Physical Therapy

Regional Interdependence - Thinking Physical Therapy | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
I recently read an article by Muth et al which looked at the effects of thoracic spine thrust manipulation on patients with signs of rotator cuff pathology. This study utilizes the concept of regio...

Via sportEX
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Brain Training Combined with Daily Intermittent Fasting Improves Cognition, Say Calorie Restriction Proponents at LivingTheCRWay.com

OSSINING, N.Y., March 19, 2013 /PRNewswire/ – Known for giving very sharp, lucid interviews, the late Walter Breuning at 114 was the oldest man in the world. He followed a Daily Intermittent Fasting plan, eating a large breakfast, smaller lunch and then fasting until the next morning. His eating plan resonates with Brain Booster members of LivingTheCRWay.com, who find that some time away from food improves brain function. Brain Boosters focus on improving memory, processing speed, accuracy, and thought synchronization – while reducing risk of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases and dementia.

“When scientists or doctors make discoveries that can affect people’s lives positively, LivingTheCRWay invites them to host live teleconferences that are friendly conversations with the members. Participants have time to ask questions that matter to them,” says Paul McGlothin, President of LivingTheCRWay.com. He continues, “A short fast to improve brain health was inspired by the work of Dr. Mark Mattson, Chief Neurobiologist of the National Institute on Aging.” Listen as Dr. Mattson discusses the research that helped LivingTheCRWay create its Brain Booster plan: Calorie Restriction for a Better Brain (http://rs1475.freeconferencecall.com/fcc/cgi-bin/play.mp3/4242038075-965256-17.mp3).

The Brain Booster program includes:

 


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Fitness and Exercise
Scoop.it!

Volume vs. Strength Gains For Hypertrophy

Volume vs. Strength Gains For Hypertrophy | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Things have been nuts the last few weeks and I’ve been crazy busy at Renegade which is why I haven’t posted in a while.

Via Bonnie Sayers
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Crossfit
Scoop.it!

T NATION | 19 Squat & Deadlift Variations

T NATION | 19 Squat & Deadlift Variations | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

Here's what you need to know...

• Variety is good for both strength and hypertrophy and it helps prevent overuse injuries.

• Every body is unique, and the best form for a lifter is the one that best suits his unique anthropometry and injury history.

• Contrary to popular belief, there's no standardized perfect form, only what form is best suited for your body and goals.

Strength training gurus love to say there's only one way to perform a lift, and that all other techniques and variations are either wrong or ineffective. Such a philosophy is shortsighted, and this article will show how intelligent variation can build a bigger, stronger, bulletproof body.

First, every body is unique, and the best form for a lifter is the one that best suits his or her unique limb lengths, body segment proportions, tendon attachment points, muscularity, and injury history.

Second, the form that a lifter uses is heavily predicated on his or her overall goals. These goals might include hypertrophy, in which case it's possible to accentuate tension on a particular muscle; strength, in which case it's possible to perform a lift in a manner that maximizes leverages; or transference, in which case it's possible to execute an exercise in a manner that best transfers to another lift or sporting action.

And third, all lifters should purposely perform lifts in a variety of ways in order to build well-rounded and maximal strength.

Stubbornly sticking to a particular form or variation that isn't right for you, no matter how popular it is, will eventually lead to injury. It's akin to forcing a square peg through a round hole.

 


Via Myboxlive
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from She Enters The 5th Chamber Of Fitness
Scoop.it!

MENTAL FITNESS: Tone And Definition

MENTAL FITNESS:  Tone And Definition | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Unlike men, women typically don't gain size from strength training, because compared to men, women have 10 to 30 times less of the hormones that cause muscle hypertrophy. You will, however, develop muscle tone and definition.

Via The New Media Moguls
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from The 5 Chambers Of Fitness
Scoop.it!

All about hypertrophy

All about hypertrophy | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

Hypertrophy, from the Greek for excess nourishment, is the word used to describe muscles that get bigger and, as the sport of bodybuilding evolved, training methods, exercise, nutrition, supplements and, in some cases drugs, were all used to promote increases in muscle size.


A sarcomere is the smallest contractile unit to be found within your muscles. Sacromeres consist of two protein strands: the thick myosin and thinner actin filament. These filaments slide past one another to produce movement. Sarcomere hypertrophy describes the thickening of the actin and myosin protein filaments that make up the bulk of your muscle mass. If you expose your muscles to a sufficiently heavy load, your body will respond by making the actin and myosin bigger and therefore stronger.


This is an anabolic process – anabolism being the building up of tissue hence anabolic (or muscle building) steroids. Sarcomere hypertrophy results in an increase in strength and is sometimes called functional hypertrophy; that is to say the muscles are bigger AND stronger. Sarcomere hypertrophy is associated with heavy weights and intense workouts using from 4 to 6 repetitions per set.


Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy describes how muscles get bigger, not through the actin and myosin increasing in size, but because of an accumulation of non-contractile elements between the individual sarcomere. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy can be thought of as fluid retention that, although it makes the muscles look bigger, it has no effect on performance or strength. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is associated higher volume training using multiple sets of 8 to 12 repetitions.


Most bodybuilders will use both moderate and higher repetitions to maximise muscle hypertrophy. They may cycle their workouts and perform periods of heavy training alternated with periods of lighter training or they may combine both approaches within the same workout.


Sarcomere hypertrophy tends to be longer lasing if there is a break in training. Atrophy, the breakdown of muscle, takes time whereas sarcoplasmic hypertrophy relies on regular workouts and will start to dissipate within a matter of days if no training takes place. This explains why people who train with heavy weights can hold onto their muscle size and strength despite long periods of inactivity.


Some experts believe that, in highly trained individuals and the genetically blessed, muscle cells don’t just get bigger but they also increase in number.
 
This theory has been shown to hold true with animals but has yet to be conclusively proven in humans although, judging by the physiques on display at the most recent Mr Olympia contest, it’s hard to image that the competitors muscles are the same as yours and mine but just bigger.


Testosterone is the major anabolic hormone which, along with growth hormone, is responsible for muscle growth. Like women go through menopause, men experience andropause where their production of hormones decreases. This doesn’t mean you can’t gain muscle as you age, just that it will happen more slowly.


Read More: http://goo.gl/BIHyaB


Via The New Media Moguls
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Fall Prevention
Scoop.it!

Fall Prevention Kits | Products That Prevent Seniors From Falling

Fall Prevention Kits | Products That Prevent Seniors From Falling | Physical therapy | Scoop.it
Prevent falls and slips at home or at work with anti slip fall prevention pre-cut tape kits. Perfect for preventing falls by elderly senior citizens and the whole family.

Via Cathie
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bronson Ingland from Family Homecare
Scoop.it!

Certain interventions may effectively reduce falls in elderly

Certain interventions may effectively reduce falls in elderly | Physical therapy | Scoop.it

It's becoming increasingly clear that many elderly individuals would prefer to age at home. However, this population has an increased risk of experiencing a fall and having difficulty getting up again, which is why it's important for them to have home care workers looking for out them. Recently, a study published in the Cochrane Library found that interventions may be effective in reducing falls among senior citizens who live in their home.


Via Qualicare Franchise
more...
No comment yet.