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Sony Sonnar FE 55mm 1.8 ZA Review

Sony Sonnar FE 55mm 1.8 ZA Review | Photothing | Scoop.it
This review is long overdue.

I did a hands on impression here and announced the full review weeks ago 

It feels solid, relatively small and relatively light.

The focus ring (which is the only ring on the lens) is really smooth.

I do love how the 9 aperture blades look when closed down.

I don't do complicated charts and all that in my reviews, I rather talk
about things that I like or not about the products. When it's a lens or a
camera, I post images mostly, because I think it all comes down to one
thing: image quality

It's actually good to mention that the lens comes with metal lens hood,
front and rear caps and a soft case. This is nice from Sony. Not all the
manufacturers do that (you hear me Olympus?...) 

Honestly, there is not much to this lens as far as exterior design, it
looks like a regular lens.  The lens is rather small, made of metal, and it
feels solid. it's weather-sealed too.

Mounted on the NEX F3

When I got mine, I love how it felt in my hands, but I first thought it was
overpriced. A 50mm (well 55) at $1000 USD.  And then I mounted it... Trust
me, when you mount this lens on the A7, and take a couple shot, IT ALL
MAKES SENSE.

 "The transition from the "in focus" to the "out of focus" is somehow
brutal but smooth"

 

 

 

 

 This lens is incredibly sharp, even at 1.8, it really is insane, I
mean...it's razor sharp.

The bokeh is creamy and pleasant to the eyes. 

All the images below have been shot with the Sony A7 at 1.8

The transition from the "in focus" to the "out of focus" is somehow brutal
but smooth; sound contradictory right? but that's what it looks like.
It gives you that  3D on every shot you take wide open, even when you
starting to stop it down.

who said bokeh?

SOOC JPEG, you can see that 3D effect I was talking about above

Wide open, it "extracts" elements from the scene

Distortion and vignetting are very negligeable. In fact, the vignette are
rather nice than bothering to a point where I always leave them in the
image (though I could fix it in post).

Thin depth of field

This lens will have you taking pictures of random this around you!!!

Jpeg straight from RAW with no editing, just a little cropping.

  The 55 has become my secret  weapon when it comes to portraits, the
sharpness is ridiculous, the bokeh is creamy, the zeiss contrast is there
in the raw files...Impressive!!!

The additional 5mm are like a gift and a curse: on one hand, it gives you
that extra depth, enhance the shallow depth of field that is so dear to us,
on the other, it reduces the field of view compared to a regular 50mm. 5mm
might not sound like much, but trust me, it has a huge impact on the
overall  use of this lens. 

One thing I don't like about the lens is the minimum focus distance, it's
0.5m. Way to far, it makes it hard to get close to tiny subjet.

The lens has some light vignetting that I generally do not correct when I
shoot portraits with it. As you can see below, the image on the left is a
RAW file converted to JPEG, the one on the right is with the correction
applied in lightroom. There is definitely some vignetting going on, but as
I said, I always leave it on when I shoot portrait, it doesn't bother me,
it's rather pleasing. If I was to shoot landscape, i would correct it every
time. it really depends on what you want to achieve with it.

Pros: Solid/weather-sealed/light/ sharp as a razor even at
1.8/versatile/perfect on the A7 series/ versatile/ 3D pop/ Zeiss contrast

Cons: Expensive/some chromatic aberration (though negligeable)/ vignetting
might bother some/minimum focus distance too long

Bottom line for me: if you have one of the A7's, then this lens is a must
have, it might seem overpriced but trust me it's worth it. I have yet to
see a better autofocus "50" from any manufacturer, any!!! 

I'll keep adding shots from that wonderful lens to this post, so keep
peeping it from time to time.

1.

 
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4 Ways Self-Critique Can Improve Your Photography

4 Ways Self-Critique Can Improve Your Photography | Photothing | Scoop.it
Learning how to constructively critique your own photography can not only help you make better photographs each time you pick up a camera, but it will also build your confidence as a photographer, and prepare you for the inevitable critiques ...
Roger Marc's insight:

photo tips tricks/ very useful

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Sony Alpha 7 review: Full-frame mirrorless is here: Digital ...

Sony Alpha 7 review: Full-frame mirrorless is here: Digital ... | Photothing | Scoop.it
Sony just can't get this line of cameras up to professional standards yet. Too bad. Would love to see them really make a full-frame mirrorless light weight camera be worth the money. But then their lens choices are just weird.
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The blue fruit: HnRM rants on Canon and Nikon: 2 uninspired Giants

The blue fruit: HnRM rants on Canon and Nikon: 2 uninspired Giants | Photothing | Scoop.it
Roger Marc's insight:

Frustration about the lack of innovation on Canon and Nikon cameras

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The Problem With The Focus-Recompose Method | Digital Photography School

The Problem With The Focus-Recompose Method | Digital Photography School | Photothing | Scoop.it


Conclusion

Focus-Recompose is easy, intuitive, quick and self-defeating. While this method will work in some situations, there’s no way to know how well it will work without calculating your depth of field before each shot to see if you have any wiggle room with your depth of field. So don’t be afraid to use your other focus points to avoid focusing and recomposing. I won’t disagree that the center point is the most accurate but the other focus points are hands down a better option than recomposing without refocusing.....


Via Thomas Menk
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22 Vintage Photos Of Silicon Valley Before It Became The Center Of The Tech Universe

22 Vintage Photos Of Silicon Valley Before It Became The Center Of The Tech Universe | Photothing | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley wasn't always focused on tech.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Have Your Say: Best Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera of 2013

Have Your Say: Best Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera of 2013 | Photothing | Scoop.it
2013 saw a lot of new mirrorless cameras, from minor updates to older models to all-new products like the waterproof Nikon 1 AW1 and the world's first full-frame enthusiast mirrorless cameras with Sony's Alpha A7 and A7R.
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Landscape Photography Tips and Tricks

Hey guys I wanted to take you with me on a recent landscape shoot along a local river and share some landscape photography tips and tricks. Let me know if yo...
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Great tips and tricks

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Street Photography | Rodney Boles

Street Photography | Rodney Boles | Photothing | Scoop.it


Street Photography. The Definitive Moment. I've been obsessed with the genre since I started shooting the small mirrorless Fuji X series.

I love street photography for many of the same reasons I initially loved landscape photography. It teaches me to see. Instead of seeing the amazing wonders of nature, it makes me see the wonders in people and towns around me. The human moments that transcend time. The shadows that interplay with architectural elements in certain light......



Via Thomas Menk
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