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Photography Basics: Understanding Exposure | Picablog | Picaboo Blog

Photography Basics: Understanding Exposure | Picablog | Picaboo Blog | Photographylessons | Scoop.it
Understanding how to achieve proper exposure is the fundamental key to photography. No one likes a too dark or too bright picture. That is exposure! Read this article and you'll learn how to adjust your camera to get the perfect shot.
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Understanding Exposure - ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained

Understanding Exposure - ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

 

When you think of the craft or art of photography, you must immediately think of exposure. Exposure is a critical element that determines what is actually recorded on film or the image sensor.

 

There are three adjustable elements that control the exposure - ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed.

 

+ ISO ratings determine the image sensor’s sensitivity to light, each value of the rating represents a “stop” of light, and each incremental ISO number (up or down) represents a doubling or halving of the sensor’s sensitivity to light.

 

+ The Aperture controls the lens’ diaphragm, which controls the amount of light traveling through the lens to the film plane. The aperture setting is indicated by the f-number, whereas each f-number represents a “stop” of light.

 

+ The Shutter Speed indicates the speed in which the curtain opens then closes, and each shutter speed value also represents a “stop” of light. The shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second.

 

When these three elements are combined, they represent a given exposure value (EV) for a given setting. Any change in any one of the three elements will have a measurable and specific impact on how the remaining two elements react to expose the film frame or image sensor and how the image ultimately looks.

 

For example, if you increase the f-stop, you decrease the size of the lens’ diaphragm thus reducing the amount of light hitting the image sensor, but also increasing the DOF (depth of field) in the final image. Reducing the shutter speed affects how motion is captured, in that this can cause the background or subject to become blurry. However, reducing shutter speed (keeping the shutter open longer) also increases the amount of light hitting the image sensor, so everything is brighter. Increasing the ISO, allows for shooting in lower light situations, but you increase the amount of digital noise inherent in the photo. It is impossible to make an independent change in one of the elements and not obtain an opposite effect in how the other elements affect the image, and ultimately change the EV.

 

Read more : http://goo.gl/cXBf8

 


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Photography Definitions: Glossary of Photographic Terms

Photography Definitions: Glossary of Photographic Terms | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Glossary of photographic terms

 

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I DIG DIGITAL ART! AN MJHS BLOG SITE

I DIG DIGITAL ART!  AN MJHS BLOG SITE | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Cool Junior High digital art blog...Lots of great photoshop assignments.

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Digital Photography Tips: Digital Photography School

Digital Photography Tips: Digital Photography School | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Photography lessons and assignments and information oh my!

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Photography Foundations Tutorials from lynda.com

Photography Foundations Tutorials from lynda.com | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Excellent tutorials for digital photography and all are free!

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Digital Art Education: How to Start a Digital Photography Class

Digital Art Education: How to Start a Digital Photography Class | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

first digital photography shooting projects of the year are: Photographing a Subject from Several Angles, and Shadows as the Subject (this one helps them think abstractly about big shapes instead of the subject)

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10 rules of photo composition (and why they work)

10 rules of photo composition (and why they work) | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

 

n photography, it’s not just what you shoot that counts – the way that you shoot it is crucial, too. Poor photo composition can make a fantastic subject dull, but a well-set scene can create a wonderful image from the most ordinary of situations.

 

With that in mind, we’ve picked our top 10 photo composition ‘rules’ to show you how to transform your images.

 

Photo Composition Tip 1 : Simplify the scene

When you look at a scene with your naked eye, your brain quickly picks out subjects of interest. But the camera doesn’t discriminate – it captures everything in front of it, which can lead to a cluttered, messy picture with no clear focal point.

 

Photo Composition Tip 2 : Fill the frame

When you’re shooting a large-scale scene it can be hard to know how big your subject should be in the frame, and how much you should zoom in by. In fact, leaving too much empty space in a scene is the most widespread compositional mistake (learn how to Replace boring skies in Photoshop). It makes your subject smaller than it needs to be and can also leave viewers confused about what they’re supposed to be looking at.

 

Photo Composition Tip 3 : Aspect ratio

It’s easy to get stuck in a rut and take every picture with the camera held horizontally. Try turning it to get a vertical shot instead, adjusting your position or the zoom setting as you experiment with the new style. You can often improve on both horizontal and vertical shots by cropping the photo later.

 

Photo Composition Tip 4 : Avoid the middle

When you’re just starting out, it’s tempting to put whatever you’re shooting right in the centre of the frame. However, this produces rather static, boring pictures. One of the ways to counteract this is to use the Rule of Thirds, where you split the image up into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, and try to place your subject on one of these imaginary lines or intersections. This is an overrated approach, though.

 

Photo Composition Tip 5 : Leading lines

A poorly composed photograph will leave your viewers unsure about where to look, and their attention might drift aimlessly around the scene without finding a clear focal point. However, you can use lines to control the way people’s eyes move around the picture.

 

Photo Composition Tip 6 : Use diagonals

Horizontal lines lend a static, calm feel to a picture, while vertical ones often suggest permanence and stability. To introduce a feeling of drama, movement or uncertainty, look for diagonal lines instead.

 

Photo Composition Tip 7 : Space to move

Even though photographs themselves are static, they can still convey a strong sense of movement. When we look at pictures, we see what’s happening and tend to look ahead – this creates a feeling of imbalance or unease if your subject has nowhere to move except out of the frame.

 

Photo Composition Tip 8 : Backgrounds

Don’t just concentrate on your subject – look at what’s happening in the background, too. This ties in with simplifying the scene and filling the frame. You can’t usually exclude the background completely, of course, but you can control it.

 

Photo Composition Tip 9 : Creative with colours

Bright primary colours really attract the eye, especially when they’re contrasted with a complementary hue. But there are other ways of creating colour contrasts – by including a bright splash of colour against a monochromatic background, for example. You don’t need strong colour contrasts to create striking pictures, though

 

Photo Composition Tip 10 : Breaking the rules

Photo composition is a little like a visual language – you can use it to make your pictures pass on a specific message. However, just as we sometimes use the written word to create a deliberately jarring effect, we can do the same with photos by breaking with standard composition conventions.

 

Read more : http://goo.gl/2nijW


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10 Things Henri Cartier-Bresson Can Teach You About Street Photography

10 Things Henri Cartier-Bresson Can Teach You About Street Photography | Photographylessons | Scoop.it
In preparation for my upcoming street photography workshops in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Chicago I have been doing quite a bit of research into Henri Cartier-Bresson, the Godfather of street photography.
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Franklin Photography | Assignments and Info for Mr. Faulkner's class

Franklin Photography | Assignments and Info for Mr. Faulkner's class | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Sequential lessons with good resources.

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Digital Photography (old) | Utah Electronic High School

Digital Photography (old) | Utah Electronic High School | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Vocabulary AND lots of fabulous assignments

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Digital Photography an the GIMP - Assignments

Digital Photography an the GIMP - Assignments | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Digital photography assignments designed for a one term high school photography class.

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Online Exhibitions - The Center for Fine Art Photography

Gallery upon gallery of photo exhibitions.  Use this for inspiration for specific photography lessons.

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Masters of Photography: Photographer Summaries

Short descriptions of famous photographers in art history

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Basics of Photography: The Complete Guide

Basics of Photography: The Complete Guide | Photographylessons | Scoop.it

Very basic information to begin using digital camera.  Includes parts of camera, auto settings, manual settings, post production, etc.

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