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Photography Now
The role of photography today
Curated by Mario Pires
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QUESTION | Pourquoi cette tendance à monumentaliser les photographies ?

QUESTION | Pourquoi cette tendance à monumentaliser les photographies ? | Photography Now | Scoop.it

La photographie n’échappe pas à une forme de monumentalisation qui touche l’ensemble de l’art contemporain. D’où vient cette monumentalisation, quel est son contenu idéologique et que nous dit-elle de notre rapport à l’image ?

Mario Pires's insight:

"Omniprésence et domination : des régimes d’images qui ont plus à voir avec la propagande qu’avec l’art. A qui profite l’art des artistes-pharaons ?"

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Colin Pantall's blog: The Hot Book!

Colin Pantall's blog: The Hot Book! | Photography Now | Scoop.it

I quite like the idea of the 'hot' book, I like the idea of limited editions and books selling out and oh, look, I've got one and it's worth lots of money.
It's all a load of nonsense of course, but it adds a certain energy and gives us all something to talk about.

Mario Pires's insight:

"So there is a mode of discourse that goes with this apparently objective style, and the assumptions of the typology stick with us even though we know they are nonsense. It's like squaring the circle. I guess it's the same with Fontcuberta's work. He has fun with the presentation of science and makes merry with vitrines and the archive. But the vitrine of the art world is where his reputation is made. It's like he rips the ground from under his feet, but still he floats. And that's a miracle!"

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About a woman : La femme en photographie

About a woman :  La femme en photographie | Photography Now | Scoop.it

The Nailya Alexander Gallery in New York is holding a touching exhibition of thirty photographs of women taken from early last century up to the present day.

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Soigner les plaies à l'âme des reporters de guerre

Soigner les plaies à l'âme des reporters de guerre | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Le métier de reporter véhicule ses propres fantasmes, oscillant entre glamour et camboui. L’icône du reporter au gilet multipoches, ce gaillard qui ne flanche jamais, est une mythologie aussi fausse qu’encombrante. «Ma légitimité ne s’indexe pas sur ma barbe, mes nanas et mes cicatrices. C‘est un comportement grégaire, infantile, typique de la surenchère des tribus finissantes», observe Vincent Hugeux. Parce que cette imaginerie du reporter impénétrable s’effrite, l’omerta règnerait comme un signe de distinction. «C’est le prestige des derniers mohicans».

Mario Pires's insight:

Are photo-reporters suffering from the Superhero complex, thinking they are the key to save the world and punish injustices ?  Mythologies are very attractive, and ca carry on for a very long time. All this should trigger a better debate, specially outside of the "tribe".

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Brigitte Lacombe | The Talks

Brigitte Lacombe | The Talks | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Brigitte Lacombe: My work and my life are the same thing to me. I don’t have a life on one side and work on the other side. My entire life has been my work. I don’t have a family, I am by myself, I have made very strict choices.

Mario Pires's insight:

"Does your subject’s profession influence your portrait?


I don’t think so. I think a good portrait is a good portrait. And there are so many different ways to do a portrait. For me this has no influence because I am always looking for the same thing. I don’t think I shoot someone differently if they are an actor, or a designer, or even a politician. I approach the people as people that I am interested in. I propose a lot of my assignments. I have eliminated a lot of people that I am not so fascinated by and I photograph people I am interested in.

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The Weekly Edit: Women’s Health – Jamie Chung

The Weekly Edit: Women’s Health – Jamie Chung | Photography Now | Scoop.it
Creative Director: Theresa Griggs
Director of Photography:
 Sarah Rozen
Deputy Director of Photography: Freyda Tavin
Prop Stylist: Elizabeth Press 
Photographer: Jamie Chung
Mario Pires's insight:

" I’m very curious in general, always watching, reading or listening to something. Making an effort to be conscious of my surroundings helps a great deal- (actually- I just made a picture inspired by a Chinese restaurant’s fish tank..!) I also do journaling, sensory deprivation- aka extended showering, and sketching."

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Stuart Franklin: how I photographed Tiananmen Square and 'tank man'

Stuart Franklin: how I photographed Tiananmen Square and 'tank man' | Photography Now | Scoop.it
The Magnum photographer tells his story of the 1989 protests, from
peaceful demonstration to bloody crackdown, the iconic 'tank man' –
and how hamburgers gave him his big break
Mario Pires's insight:

"As I was photographing the tank, I had very clear memories of the Prague spring of 1968, when citizens faced off with Russian tanks. The atmosphere soon became chaotic in the hotel, as people were worried about getting their stories out in the unfolding tragedy. Authorities inside the hotel confiscated footage, but I packed my film into a box of tea and gave it to a French student who was heading back to Paris. She got it to Magnum."

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Japanese Photobooks at the ICP Library: Revisited

Japanese Photobooks at the ICP Library: Revisited | Photography Now | Scoop.it
Photobooks are like candy. Temptation is constant. And, if you don’t watch out, your bookshelves begin to bulge and overflow.
Mario Pires's insight:

"Some were brought down from top shelves, while others were perennial favorites whose ragged covers show much handling. The books are presented below with abbreviated commentaries from the 10×10 specialists who selected them."

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The More Things Change: An Interview with Jasper Johns

The More Things Change: An Interview with Jasper Johns | Photography Now | Scoop.it

We tend to think that a photograph of someone reveals something about that person, but sometimes, what we take away from an image is ultimately dependent upon the circumstances; the portrait’s truth to the subject perhaps relative, its evidentiary value negligible, its elemental nature morphing and evolving through the process of being reworked, reconsidered—depersonalized (or not)—as it gets recontextualized.

Mario Pires's insight:

"I don’t think that the photograph alters the painting or that the painting alters the photograph. I am not sure that there was an “initial” “idea.” The response to the photograph was not a preconception of the paintings, etc., but the activation of an energy that moved toward or through the various works. One might imagine a kind of chain reaction in which each element is affected by the nature of the others."

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Interview: Conversation with Tintype Artist Keliy Anderson-Staley

Interview: Conversation with Tintype Artist Keliy Anderson-Staley | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Keliy Anderson-Staley is an assistant professor of photography at the University of Houston.

Mario Pires's insight:

"Not only is every photographic process ever invented still currently in use, but portraiture, in particular, is everywhere. Because of this saturation, I think it is pretty rare that we pause to really look at a face and examine it, the way we might standing in front of a portrait by Vermeer or Eakins.

On some level I think just the seeming antiquity of the tintype image can be jarring. Even the people sitting for the image are frequently surprised by it — they recognize themselves, but also often say they see their grandparents."

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How The Iconic D-Day Photos Were Almost Lost Forever

How The Iconic D-Day Photos Were Almost Lost Forever | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Watch the video that shows how famed photojournalist Robert Capa's negatives were almost lost (Robert Capa's soldier in the surf -- a miraculous photograph that we almost never saw.

Mario Pires's insight:

"Capa’s film survived only because he carried it off the beach himself. His colleague Bob Landry’s film, along with the film of nine other photographers and cinematographers, was lost, having been handed off to a colonel who dropped the whole pack in the ocean while boarding a transport ship. And although Capa shot approximately 106 frames on the beach, only a handful have survived. "

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Les indiscrètes // El indiscreto // The indiscreet (by Jeanloup Sieff)

Les indiscrètes // El indiscreto // The indiscreet (by Jeanloup Sieff) | Photography Now | Scoop.it

The impulse that led you to make an image is a thing that you cannot share with anyone, even if you explain it. What remains is a surface that will live its own life, that will belong to everybody. I accept that surface.” – Jeanloup Sieff

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That much is true.

That much is true. | Photography Now | Scoop.it

What the image sharing culture has revealed is that non-pros are much better at taking pictures than anyone thought. In an analog world, everyone kept for themselves: Pros shooting for large distribution periodicals and amateurs shooting for friends and family.With the advent of Flickr, we started seeing a large  volume of non pros with high quality images. It wasn’t new, it was always there. We just hadn’t seen it before.

Mario Pires's insight:

"With 1,8 billion images uploaded and shared a day, it is time to break the divide. There is no reason to protect something that isn’t. There shouldn’t be pro vs amateurs. The division should only be talent vs dull. One promoted, nurtured and celebrated, the other hidden in the bottomless pit of some password protected social media platform. There should be exchange platforms between pro and amateurs where both could learn from each other, whether online or in real life. Finally, there should be other defining terms than whether one has a check in his hand and the other doesn’t."

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Children cultivating garden

Children cultivating garden | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Children cultivating garden
Charles C. Zoller, American, 1854 - 1934

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Photography theory: a bluffer's guide - Telegraph

Photography theory: a bluffer's guide - Telegraph | Photography Now | Scoop.it
Bewildered by Berger? Stumped by Sontag? We read the essential photography theory so you don't have to
Mario Pires's insight:

Why should photographers read theoretical books ? Are they essential ? Could you do without them all together ? I have my answers, you should get yours, perhaps not in this article, but everyone who cares about images should read beyond how-to's and tutorials. 

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TANK

TANK | Photography Now | Scoop.it
I had written a thing, was all ready to post it today.
Then I realized it was all wrong, so I’ve got nothing.
Except this picture from Official Ottawa.
Parliament Hill with Leopard tank.
And, yes, I have joined Instagram.
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The Photo That Made Me: Christopher Morris, Panama 1989

The Photo That Made Me: Christopher Morris, Panama 1989 | Photography Now | Scoop.it

A new series in which TIME LightBox talks to renowned photographers about the one photograph they made that they believe jump-started their career, garnered them international attention, or simply sparked an interest in photography.  This inaugural installment features TIME contract photographer Christopher Morris, who talks about a powerful image he made in Panama in 1989. 

Mario Pires's insight:

This image gave me a new sense of self confidence — it showed me that I could control fear, something that in my earlier conflict work I had struggled with. I had a clear understanding from earlier, similar situations that if I didn’t learn how to manage fear, that it would eventually lead to my death.

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The Selfie and a New Global Economic Order | Visual Culture Blog

The Selfie and a New Global Economic Order | Visual Culture Blog | Photography Now | Scoop.it

A few months ago I wrote a blog post where I advanced the theory that selfies are a mimetic response to the rise of celebrity culture epitomised by Kim Kardiashian. The popularity of the selfie is thus inextricably linked to the popularity of the celebrity who uses the selfie as a means to advertise the self like a commercial brand. In this blog post I want to expand on these initial findings.

Mario Pires's insight:

"Selfies are generally associated with narcissistic tendencies – a love for the self that needs to be captured in a photograph. On a psychoanalytical level one could compare the selfie with the mirror stage which Jacques Lacan described as the child’s first step towards identification. In fact, Lacan’s description that the mirror stage ‘typifies an essential libidinal relationship with the body image’ can be seen in the large proportion of selfies where sexual allure is performed via the body."

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Tiananmen Square, 25 Years Later

Tiananmen Square, 25 Years Later | Photography Now | Scoop.it

I had an email exchange with Peter T. after our article on Monday about the Leica Gallery opening in L.A., and he sent me these four pictures from Tiananmen Square 25 years ago.

Mario Pires's insight:

"One role of photography and visual storytelling can be to offer an irrefutable witness to history, so that the voices of people who sometimes don't have a loud voice can be heard powerfully forever."

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LBM Dispatch 4: Three Valleys

LBM Dispatch 4: Three Valleys | Photography Now | Scoop.it
After seeing Alec Soth’s photos of Silicon Valley, I wanted to see them in his Three Valleys series to see how my perception of them changed.
Mario Pires's insight:

"As someone who visits the Central Valley regularly from the Bay Area, I’m very familiar with the time-warp nature of traveling from Silicon Valley to the San Joaquin Valley. Everything is different. Life moves at a different pace. Driving huge distances becomes normal. Technology even seems somewhat marooned in the past and any cutting edge technology is like magic."

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PORTFOLIO | Lara Kiosses

PORTFOLIO | Lara Kiosses | Photography Now | Scoop.it
Lara Kiosses est une jeune photographe autodidacte. Elle entretient un lien particulier avec les fleurs et la végétation qu'elle allie incessamment au cor
Mario Pires's insight:

"Lara Kiosses est née en France mais c’est en Afrique qu’elle grandit. Son travail se trouve largement marqué par ce mélange culturel de jeunesse. Si elle vit et travaille aujourd’hui à Paris, elle ne manque pas de faire appel à des univers très divers."

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Ben Landa's curator insight, June 18, 3:33 AM
Lara Kiosses est une jeune photographe autodidacte. Elle entretient un lien particulier avec les fleurs et la végétation qu'elle allie incessamment au cor Ben Landa Studio

http://www.benlandastudios.com/

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August Sander The Women

August Sander  The Women | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Feroz gallery directed by Julian Sander great-grandson of the german photographer  August Sander presented the fourth part of the series consecrated to August Sander.

Mario Pires's insight:

"The four sub-groups in this exhibition consider the social role of women from different perspectives. Couples, relationship, family and individual portraits convey a modern and emancipated image of the woman of the 20th Century."

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Marie Docher - Santiago | LensCulture

Marie Docher - Santiago | LensCulture | Photography Now | Scoop.it
During a long, hot, soul-searching pilgrimage, French photographer Marie Docher took a self-portrait every time she had to stop to quench her thirst — she made each photo before she took a sip of water
Mario Pires's insight:

"The ritual was simple. Each time I was thirsty, I made a spontaneous self-portrait, without posing, with a small B&W camera."

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Conscientious | Review: Naked by Rimaldas Viksraitis

Conscientious | Review: Naked by Rimaldas Viksraitis | Photography Now | Scoop.it

Naked; photographs by Rimaldas Viksraitis; 96 pages; Heden; 2012

Mario Pires's insight:

"Viksraitis often delights in what one could call a staged absurdity. I suppose one read that into more or less all of his photographs, and a critical reading is always just that, a critical reading. But the photographs inNaked appear to be somewhat more focused, with the element of documentary (in the loosest sense) mostly absent, so that the reading might come with less cross-cultural baggage. When I wrote “staged absurdity” I’m mostly thinking of a vodka-fueled, Eastern European magical realism, where the magical isn’t quite so magical (it’s more than just a tad mundane actually), and let’s not even talk about realism."

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Auckland Festival of Photography Interview with Tanu Gago

Auckland Festival of Photography Interview with Tanu Gago | Photography Now | Scoop.it

In Tanu Gago’s new body of work “Tama'ita'i Pasifika Mao'i” commissioned by the 2014 Auckland Photography Festival, this New Zealand artist challenges how Pacific women are represented with the desire to move imagery away from cultural stereotypes.

Mario Pires's insight:

"To balance out the narrative I wanted to look at the women in my family. I talked to a lot of people about what they imagine the Pacific experience is for women. Many said ‘oh aren’t they unemployed, with like nine kids sitting at home wearing Mena dresses and huge flowers behind their ears! That’s what people outside of my community think, and that’s their lasting image, which is perpetuated by advertising and national rhetoric that really promotes New Zealand as being a Pacific country and the women as decorations"

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