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Student of the Questionable Eye

Student of the Questionable Eye | photography | Scoop.it
Texture and Color (Austin, TX) Patrick Blackburn© For more contemplative photography please visit my Tumblr page at http://miksang-photography.tumblr.com (Photo: Texture and Color (Austin, TX) #miksang For more contemplative photography please...
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Miksang contemplative photography- Dennis Connor

Dennis Connor

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Fuji X-E1 foodie.

Fuji X-E1 foodie. | photography | Scoop.it

I don’t normally post about my commercial work but since this was done using my Fuji X-E1 and 35mm Fujinon lens I felt it was worth a post. I have been working for a new boutique hotel that has opened in our little City of Ely. This work is now being put to good use as you can see below so I can post how I took the shots so that others may see how this was done.


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Mirrorless Battle: OM-D vs GH3 vs X-E1 | Jordan Steele

Mirrorless Battle: OM-D vs GH3 vs X-E1 |  Jordan Steele | photography | Scoop.it


This should be a fun comparison.  I have the pleasure of having three of the best mirrorless cameras around in my possession right now: a newly acquired Fuji X-E1 with 35mm f/1.4, my trusty Olympus OM-D E-M5 and the Panasonic GH3, fresh into my hands for review.  Expect full reviews of the Fuji X-E1 and Panasonic GH3 in the coming weeks. Anyway, I thought it would be fun to pop the Panasonic Leica 25mm f/1.4 on the two Micro 4/3 cameras and do a controlled studio shot against the Fuji X-E1 with its Fujinon 35mm f/1.4.  Due to the different sized sensors, these setups result in an almost identical field of view, with the 4:3 aspect ratio of the m4/3 cameras allowing for a little wider field of view in the vertical direction. The 35mm on the X-E1 is slightly narrower than the 25mm on Micro 4/3, however (equivalent to the field of view of a 53mm lens on full frame vs the equivalent field of view of 50mm for the Leica). As a result of this minor difference in aspect ratio and field of view, the crops you’re about to see will make the Fuji look like it is rendering things slightly larger.  All images were taken on a tripod with 2 second timer, and all were taken from the same position......

 

Conclusion

Well, the X-E1 is a camera with fantastic image quality, that much is certain.  Not surprisingly, it produces cleaner images throughout the ISO range and retains great detail.  Is the Fuji the best of these three cameras then?  In pure image quality from the sensor?  Yes.  In other ways?  Not so fast….  Wait for my full review of the X-E1 for more detailed discussion, but both the GH3 and OM-D are much more responsive machines when it comes to autofocus.  Still, Fuji has a winner on their hands.  It’s also great to see Panasonic put out a body with very high image quality to match the OM-D on the stills side.


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Street photography in Soho and Covent Garden with the Fuji X-E1 | Al Power

Street photography in Soho and Covent Garden with the Fuji X-E1 | Al Power | photography | Scoop.it


A few weeks ago I went up to London to visit the Photographers gallery and check out the Mass Observation exhibition (excellent - sadly now finished) with my good friend David, and then spent an afternoon introducing him to the fine art of street photography (to which he took to pretty naturally).

tips settings


For the most part I wore my Fuji X-E1 around my wrist using a wrist strap, with my finger on the power switch. Settings were pretty much 1/250th of a second, f4-f8 and auto ISO up to 6400, and manual focused/zone focused so that if I saw something interesting approaching, I could power on, and just raise the camera to my eye and shoot, all within seconds - often without my subject even realising. I used both the 18-55 and the 35 mm, but I really liked being forced to think with my feet within the constraints of the 35mm.......


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Fuji X-E1 - The Journey Towards The Fujinon 35mm 1.4 Prime Lens | Adrian Ainsworth

Fuji X-E1 - The Journey Towards The Fujinon 35mm 1.4 Prime Lens |  Adrian Ainsworth | photography | Scoop.it


We recently went to Venice for a city break armed with both our Fuji X – E1 with the kit 18-55mm lens and our Canon 400D, which was firing through the barrel of a Sigma 70 – 300mm zoom.  Because the Fuji zoom lens is an above average stock lens we had most bases covered with this set up. Back home though and  we decided to give some thought to adding a lens to our kit but the question was what to go for? To help with this decision, I looked through our photos to see how we were shooting and it seems that with the Fuji X-E1 we shoot wide at 18mm, as below,  or on full zoom at 55mm as above. We rarely shot somewhere in between. At 18mm I was either shooting at around f8 to f10 doing cityscapes or I wanted the lowest aperture I could get f2.8, or I was at 55mm zooming in close to get the detail as with the carnival masks shot above. With the Canon we were picking out stuff further afield and getting the detail up close and dirty. Peanut especially enjoys the zoom work and snaffled perhaps our favourite shot of the trip, capturing the two gondoliers chatting below at 190mm. This points us to a number of possible lenses then. First, as we like 18 mm, we could go for the 18mm F2 R and enjoy the lovely possibilities offered by the even lower F2 aperture.  Looking back on our photos and seeing the proportion of our photos shot at this length makes this at first seem a great choice. The camera would be smaller still and even lighter and 70% of our photos would be covered by this lens........


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Alternative close-up photography with the Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 | Tom Grill

Alternative close-up photography with the Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 | Tom Grill | photography | Scoop.it


The traditional method of shooting close-up photographs is with a macro lens mounted on the camera, and, no doubt about it, this method provides the highest image quality when this is what is required. True macro lenses focus from infinity down to a 1:1 reproduction and are noted for their high resolution and lack of distortion. Fuji has a 60mm macro in its line up of lenses and Zeiss is planning to add a 50mm to the mix shortly. For precision macro work, this would be the way to go. Sometimes, however, I like to break the mold and move into some more innovative ways of shooting close-ups. The procedure is simple, but the results can often be visually interesting and, for me, more exciting creatively. The first part of my equation is to use a very fast aperture lens, usually a normal of portrait focal length, although sometimes I have used an extremely long telephoto for even more dramatic effects. I use the lens wide open, typically at f/1.4. Used in close at this aperture the lens is going to produce an exceptionally shallow depth of field.....


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Shooting the Fuji X-E1 with long lenses | Tom Grill

Shooting the Fuji X-E1 with long lenses | Tom Grill | photography | Scoop.it


In my last blog post I editorialized about the need for long telephoto lenses in Fuji-X mount to expand the pro capabilities of the system. To explore this theme, over the past few days I have been using the Fuji X-E1 and the Fuji 55-200mm zoom, and adapting some long Nikon telephotos to gain some super-tele effects. I used the Fuji 55-200mm zoom alone to do these stark compositions of some of New York's bridges in black and white......



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