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Photo Innovation: sedition Selling Fine-Art Photos for the Screen

Photo Innovation: sedition Selling Fine-Art Photos for the Screen | photography | Scoop.it

British art star Damien Hirst has sold some of his iconic spot paintings for more than a million dollars. But London-based s[edition] sells Hirst’s spot art for just $21. What collectors get for $21 is not a one-of-a-kind painting but a “digital limited edition,” a high-resolution digital file limited to 10,000 copies and capable of being displayed on any electronic screen from a smartphone to a flat-screen TV.


Via Mario Pires
Margrit OLsen's insight:

This may be  the beginning of a market that lesser known photographers could tap into.  The photographers version of an ebook. Selling  images at a low price but in a high numbered edition, and with  very low investment  of money or time (except color management).

 

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Mario Pires's curator insight, January 7, 2014 6:55 AM

Fine art for the screen, This is interesting for two reasons, Screens as a delivery medium for quality fine art in terms of resolution and content, and a technology that can prevent image theft.

James Sherwood-Rogers's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:31 AM

Art is one of the most advanced marketing industries and Damian Hirst is to the Art World what Steve Jobs was to Electronics. Commercial astute, marketing savvy and design/aesthetic oriented. 

 

As his Dot Painting Products have plateuaed and saturated demand in each sector, he has breathed new life into them by replatforming them, squeezing all possible value out of them. From original paintings, to edition paintings, to edition prints, to books and products with dots, and now another version, at an even lower price.  

 

He has continuelously experimented with new distribution models, eschewing the standard gallery or 'channel' sales route for a direct approach via auctions, and then direct via his own gallery.

 

He once said he was 'Amazed what it was possible to achieve with an E in O Level Art'. At the time he was talking about Art. Bearing in mind he is now the richest artist that has ever lived, he could equally as well have been talking about his extraordinary commercial prowess.

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Eamonn Doyle - i, Dublin street portraits | LensCulture

Eamonn Doyle - i, Dublin street portraits | LensCulture | photography | Scoop.it
The question then became: is it possible to take photographs of these people in such a way that will honour their essential, even existential, distance from me? Is it possible to photograph them in a way that says ‘I won’t gain knowledge of them by photographing them, but maybe something will come from the attempt to, maybe even from the failure to?’
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E. Brady Robinson: Art Desks

E. Brady Robinson: Art Desks | photography | Scoop.it
Do our work spaces reflect who we are? Photographer E. Brady Robinson examines that question with a series of portraits of the desks and working spaces of artists, curators, art dealers, and critics throughout the East Coast.

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See beyond seeing

See beyond seeing | photography | Scoop.it
Do you see what I see? I’m out with a number of crews in Newcastle training them in videojournalism-as-cinema.

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Mario Pires's curator insight, November 7, 2014 5:54 PM

"The way semioticians state we perceive the world is through patterns. Cognitions make a similar statement, but the way they access signs is different.

Television news plays on patterns. When you watch a newscast, it conforms to a way the journalists sees his/her world is shaped and so is yours. That world is black and white — sometimes literally e.g. Fergusson."

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Un test de français pour obtenir la nationalité

Un test de français pour obtenir la nationalité | photography | Scoop.it
Depuis le 1er  janvier, l’association nîmoise Rencontre internationale est devenue l’un des deux centres gardois de passation du test de connaissance de langue française qui entre dans le cadre...

Via Jean Brun
Margrit OLsen's insight:

Any anglophones that have taken this test? 

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Photo Innovation: sedition Selling Fine-Art Photos for the Screen

Photo Innovation: sedition Selling Fine-Art Photos for the Screen | photography | Scoop.it

British art star Damien Hirst has sold some of his iconic spot paintings for more than a million dollars. But London-based s[edition] sells Hirst’s spot art for just $21. What collectors get for $21 is not a one-of-a-kind painting but a “digital limited edition,” a high-resolution digital file limited to 10,000 copies and capable of being displayed on any electronic screen from a smartphone to a flat-screen TV.


Via Mario Pires
Margrit OLsen's insight:

This may be  the beginning of a market that lesser known photographers could tap into.  The photographers version of an ebook. Selling  images at a low price but in a high numbered edition, and with  very low investment  of money or time (except color management).

 

more...
Mario Pires's curator insight, January 7, 2014 6:55 AM

Fine art for the screen, This is interesting for two reasons, Screens as a delivery medium for quality fine art in terms of resolution and content, and a technology that can prevent image theft.

James Sherwood-Rogers's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:31 AM

Art is one of the most advanced marketing industries and Damian Hirst is to the Art World what Steve Jobs was to Electronics. Commercial astute, marketing savvy and design/aesthetic oriented. 

 

As his Dot Painting Products have plateuaed and saturated demand in each sector, he has breathed new life into them by replatforming them, squeezing all possible value out of them. From original paintings, to edition paintings, to edition prints, to books and products with dots, and now another version, at an even lower price.  

 

He has continuelously experimented with new distribution models, eschewing the standard gallery or 'channel' sales route for a direct approach via auctions, and then direct via his own gallery.

 

He once said he was 'Amazed what it was possible to achieve with an E in O Level Art'. At the time he was talking about Art. Bearing in mind he is now the richest artist that has ever lived, he could equally as well have been talking about his extraordinary commercial prowess.

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Garry Winogrand - Garry Winogrand: Visions of the Street | LensCulture

Garry Winogrand - Garry Winogrand: Visions of the Street | LensCulture | photography | Scoop.it

The Jeu de Paume presents the first retrospective in twenty-five years of the great American photographer, Garry Winogrand (1928–1984), who chronicled America in the post-war years. Winogrand is still relatively unknown because he left his work unfinished at the time of his death, but he is unquestionably one of the masters of American street photography, on a par with Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander andWilliam Klein.



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FOCUSED…. Nicholas Hayward

FOCUSED…. Nicholas Hayward | photography | Scoop.it
It’s relieving to know how universities are still keeping film photography alive.

Via Mario Pires
Margrit OLsen's insight:

I agree with Mario Pires, in that shooting film, as compared to digital, makes me more attentive to the what Im looking for in the image.

With digital one is aware of the limitless quantity, so there will always be another another chance to get it right.

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Mario Pires's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:16 AM

"Shooting on film gives me the colours and grain to my work that wouldn’t be as achievable on digital. When working digitally, I sometimes found myself mindlessly shooting without thinking enough about what I’m photographing, but with analogue I think an awful lot more."

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LA QUESTION | Que faire quand tout a déjà été fait ?

LA QUESTION | Que faire quand tout a déjà été fait ? | photography | Scoop.it
Nous connaissons tous ce sentiment un peu décourageant : « tout a déjà été fait ». Ou bien, dans une exposition que l'on apprécie particulièrement, vie

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Mario Pires's curator insight, February 5, 2014 5:23 AM

The alphabet has a limited number of letters, so has the musical scale, but both have enabled plenty of examples of unlimited creativity. It's not the subject that has to be unique, it's your approach that will make or brake your work.

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Léon Gimpel, “As de l’autochrome”, sur Télérama.fr

Léon Gimpel, “As de l’autochrome”, sur Télérama.fr | photography | Scoop.it
Les Halles de Paris en 1913, photographie couleur de Léon Gimpel. Collection Société Française de Photographie
Léon Gimpel : as de l’autochrome
Un été 1913 | Cadrages
originaux, innovations techniques… le reporter vedette du journal...

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