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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | Photography | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz


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Jean-Marie Grange's insight:

Another very good set of street photography

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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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LAST BEST HIDING PLACE | Photographer: Tim Richmond

LAST BEST HIDING PLACE | Photographer: Tim Richmond | Photography | Scoop.it

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Depressing America...

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Photo report's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:22 PM

Tim Richmond‘s American West – depicted in Last Best Hiding Place – can be placed anywhere onto the continuum that has the myth at one end and the artist’s unique vision at the other end. It’s a place filled with characters and locations that manage to be specific and completely generic at the same time, with a rough, somewhat hurt, tenderness underneath. I can’t help but think that the photographer is very much aware of what he is taking pictures of, given there appears to be a balancing act at play: Every stereotype is depicted, to be subverted right away or elsewhere. There are cowboys, sure, but they have baby faces underneath their stubble.


Richmond’s West ends up throwing stereotypes and preconceived ideas back at us, reminding us that what we’d like to think of as real is really of our own choosing. What we find is what we’re looking for. Here, photography comes full circle, because it is always at least that: A quest for that, which we already know. And as long as we’re not deluding ourselves into thinking there’s more, we’re in good shape.

 

I’ve written many times that photography really only excels when it’s being done with its own limitations in mind. These limitations arise from the technical nature of the medium in more ways than one. The properties of the camera have as much to do with it as the fact that a photographer is pointing the camera into some direction, at something in the world.

 

A long time ago, photographers were able to point their cameras at the world, a world not weighed down by preconceived ideas and earlier photographs. Now, when you point your camera at the world, you’re really pointing it more at all those images in our minds than at the world itself.

The secret then is to make this work, to produce photographs that can still stand on their own, while acknowledging all the ones that came before them. Tim Richmond‘sLast Best Hiding Place does just that, and it does it well.

All photographs © and kindly provided by Tim Richmond 


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Street photography | Photographer: Justin Sainsbury

Street photography | Photographer: Justin Sainsbury | Photography | Scoop.it

I was born in 1971 in Brighton, on the south coast of England. Taking pictures is one thing I have stuck at. It’s the occasional surprise; either in the picture or circumstance I find myself part of, which keeps me wandering.

I try not to have an agenda but seem to be drawn to the psychology of a situation- this often seems to involve a relationship of some sort, either between people or their environment. I do enjoy the fun stuff, but it’s the pictures that raise questions or might have different interpretations that really interest me. To me, it’s the business of discovering latent fictional stories in everyday situations. - Justin Sainsbury

 


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Very funny!

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Shane and Maggie | Photo story: Sara Naomi Lewkowicz

Shane and Maggie | Photo story: Sara Naomi Lewkowicz | Photography | Scoop.it

I've been a photojournalist for several years, and currently am in my first year of graduate school at Ohio University. My first semester at Ohio University has been one of the single most challenging periods of my career, and I can safely say I have worked harder than I have ever worked in my life. One of my biggest challenges came in November, when a story I had been documenting for several months took a very dark turn.

 

I had been photographing a couple, Shane and Maggie, since September. I had originally intended the story to focus on the difficulties felons face once being released from incarceration. My intention was to paint a portrait of the catch-22 many individuals find themselves in upon release, the metaphorical prison of a stigma they can never seem to escape. The story changed dramatically when one night, Shane and Maggie got into a fight. Shane began to physically abuse Maggie, slamming her up against walls and choking her in front of her two-year-old daughter, Memphis. He had possession of our cellular phones, so I reached into his pocket and steal my phone back when he was distracted. I handed my phone to another adult who was in the house,and instructed them to call the police. I then continued to document the abuse.

 

In that moment, my instincts as a photojournalist kicked in. I knew I had to stay with the story and document it in all of its ugly truth. I have continued to follow Maggie since the abuse, and am producing a multimedia piece as well as a still series. I plan on applying for several grants to continue working on this project and broadening its scope. I've also begun working closely with Donna Ferrato, who will be including my piece in Unbeatable, a project that spans her three-decade career documenting domestic violence. 

 

The biggest part of this whole upsetting situation that has made the difference has truly been Maggie. Her courage through this whole ordeal, especially considering her age, is extraordinary. She has asked me to move forward with this project and to tell her story, because she feels that the photographs could potentially help someone escape from the same type of situation she was in. "Women need to understand this can happen to them. I never thought it could happen to me, but it could," she told me. "Shane was like a fast car. When you're driving it, you think 'I might get pulled over and get a ticket.' You never think that you're going to crash." 

 

While this story is, in part, about domestic violence, it is not a reportage on a domestic dispute—it is not a news event. It seeks to take a deeper, unflinching look into the circumstances that transform a relationship into a crucible, and what happens before, during, immediately proceeding and long after an episode of violence takes place. With this story, it is my goal to examine the effects of this type of violence on the couple, the absued, the abuser, and the children who serve as witnesses to the abuse. We typically only see victims of abuse in the hours or days after having been abused. I have been able to spend time with Maggie and her children before, during, and after the assault. My next step is to travel to Alaska, where Maggie currently resides with her husband and the father of her children, and examine the long-term effects of this incident on her current relationship, on her children, and on her own sense of self. - Sara Naomi Lewkowicz


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Real life photo work. Impressive! 

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Photo report's curator insight, September 15, 2013 12:49 PM

On June 25, 2013, Sara Naomi Lewkowicz won the 2013 Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award for her work documenting Domestic Violence, to be awarded later this year at Visa Pour l’Image in Perpignan.