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Rescooped by Doug Chinnery from Fuji X-Pro1
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Fuji X-E2 - Hands on review | Tom Grill

Fuji X-E2 - Hands on review | Tom Grill | Photography | Scoop.it


.... Conclusion:

With this model Fuji has moved well beyond the introductory phase of the X-series with new features and modifications that make a real difference to a pro using this camera. Admittedly, many of these new features appear to be subtle changes, but taken together they substantially affect how the camera can be used dependably and repeatedly as a working too. We take image quality for granted, auto-focus issues are a thing of the past. The X-E2 responds quickly and smoothly, exactly the way a pro camera should operate. Fuji is building a strong reputation for listening to its client base and incorporating the changes and suggestions from their field use of Fuji products. There is undoubtedly a good reason that the X-E2 was introduced before an updated X-Pro1. It will give Fuji more time to apply what it will learn from X-E2 feedback to the new X-Pro2. I use both cameras because I do appreciate being able to switch over to an optical viewfinder, but there is something nice to be said about the compactness and handling of the X-E2 body.......


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Rescooped by Doug Chinnery from Fuji X-Pro1
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The Fuji X-E1 & Fuji X-Pro1 and why I love mine | John Barclay

The Fuji X-E1 & Fuji X-Pro1 and why I love mine | John Barclay | Photography | Scoop.it


I’ve been getting a lot of questions about the Fuji X cameras I’ve been using.  I thought it might be useful to share my thoughts on why I went with Fuji and have both the X-Pro 1 and X-E1 along with the X100. I was getting tired of lugging 40 lbs of gear in a backpack.  I was intrigued by the “mirrorless” revolution and started to investigate what was out there.  The Sony left me cold, feeling more like an electronic device rather than a camera. The Olympus is a micro 4/3 sensor and I wanted at least APS C.  I wanted the bokeh and performance that a bigger sensor would provide.  That said, the new Olympus is getting rave reviews for its performance.  I think Michael Reichman said it best in his recent review, “MFT used to mean some compromises when it came to image quality, but those days are past. Only the most neurotic pixel peeper will find anything to kvetch about with files from the Olympus E-M1 and its contemporaries.” After much research, I settled on the retro looking X100, a dedicated 23mm non-interchangable lens camera. I admit, I fell for its retro looks and unique and highly regarded dual optical/EVF viewfinder.  It has its quirks such as slow focus speed, however, when I opened the first file of a family that asked me to photograph them for a Christmas card, I was ASTOUNDED!   The color, tones and sharpness of the images were truly breathtaking..... 


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Review: Hitech 67mm Filter System | Eric Chan

Review: Hitech 67mm Filter System | Eric Chan | Photography | Scoop.it


When I found out my college roommate’s bachelor party was going to take place in the famous Yosemite National Park (Ansel Adams, anyone?), I knew I had to get my gear ready for landscapes.  I normally shoot portraits only, so my landscape gear was lacking. I have a LEE filter system for my Nikon D700 system which I love, but I didn’t want to haul 2.25lbs for the D700 body only.  So first step was to get a smaller camera system.  I sold my Olympus OM-D E-M5 when I got back from Italy because I wasn’t in love with the aspect ratio.  I felt like 14mm wasn’t all that wide and cropping from 4:3 to 3:2 made it even worse.  I heard great things about the Fuji X system so I decide to give it a try and bought a gently used Fuji X-E1 and 18-55mm f/2.8-4 off of Craigslist.  I also got a Fuji 35mm 1.4 for casual shooting, but that’s for another post. I got the camera ready, but now I needed some filters.  I knew I wanted graduated filters because all serious landscape photographers use them.  Yosemite National Park is known for its amazing landscapes, I knew I had to get some so I wouldn’t have any regrets of cheaping out after coming back.  So the hunt began. I’ll be honest, I mainly settled on the Hitech filters due to price.  When I searched for LEE filters for the D700, the price differential wasn’t very big, so I went with LEE.  However, with LEE’s Seven5 system costing significantly more (and harder to find in stock), I decided to give Hitech a try despite mixed reviews on their larger filters.  I figured with the entire system being so cheap, it would be a small gamble.......


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