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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz

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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:53 AM

Another very good set of street photography

Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures. 

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Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L.

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Beyond is a documentary by filmmaker Cale Glendening which follows my assistant Ryan and I as we complete our latest photo series in Varanasi, India- "Holy Men." Although not much technical information is discussed in this particular featurette, my goal is to inspire you and give you insight into what goes into one of my personal projects. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation.Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion." - JOEY L.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 5:27 PM

The video/pictures are very cool and interesting to see. You get to see what the people go threw. Although its not very much an educational purpose to this, you get to see the work that this artist did. Job well done.

FreeStockImages's curator insight, December 1, 11:32 AM

Amazing shot!

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10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

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Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald

Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
39-year old Bonnie is a danish mother of three. Since the age of 18, she has been working as a prostitute. Her first time having sex for money was at a visit at a brothel in a small town. Bonnie and her friend were in need of money and tried it out.

 

The experience was unpleasant and Bonnie was shy and ashamed of her body. But because of the money, she kept working. Bonnie has a house In a small village in Sealand. Here she works everyday from 9-4. When her day is over she picks up her kids and goes home to her real house in another nearby village. Her oldest daughter Michella (16) has her own apartment and her son Oliver (14) lives at home. 6-year old Noa, Bonnies youngest son, thinks his mother has a job as a cleaning lady.

 

The older children know what her profession is, and so does their school, the community and so on. It is not easy for Oliver and Michella and Michella has been called names and asked how much her mother costs. That made her very upset. Bonnie pays taxes and is registered as a business. Although she is in trouble with the IRS and has been to prison more than once. The single most important thing in Bonnie's life is her children." - MARIE HALD

 

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Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz

Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Menya’s Kids, French photographer Myriam Abdelaziz bears witness to the child labor that persists in the limestone quarries of the city. Situated along the Nile River’s western bank, Menya is host to over 300 quarries employing an estimated 15,000 individuals, many of whom are children who have left school in hopes of pulling their families out of poverty.

 

From the inexperienced age of ten, youngsters enter the quarries to collect bricks carved from the mines, facing both short and longterm dangers. Many are killed or electrocuted by elementary machinery, their limbs severed by the stone-cutting blades. Others face lifelong respiratory illness from limestone dust inhalation. For a $15 weekly salary, the kids awake at dawn and are shuttled to the worksites in darkness so as to avoid the brutal heat of midday. In summer, the temperatures exceed 100 degrees fahrenheit, and the children work from 4:00 in the afternoon to 3:00 in the morning. In the winter, they work in below freezing temperatures from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM, with little protection from the elements.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Tim Walker Photography

Tim Walker Photography | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Timothy "Tim" Walker is a British fashion photographer, who regularly shoots for Vogue, W Magazine and LOVE Magazine.  

After graduating in 1994, Walker worked as a freelance photography assistant in London before moving to New York City as a full time assistant to Richard Avedon. On returning to England, he initially concentrated on portrait and documentary work for UK newspapers. At the age of 25, he shot his first fashion story for Vogue.

Walker staged his first major exhibition at the Design Museum, London in 2008. This coincided with the release of his book ‘PICTURES’ published by teNeues.

In 2010 Walker’s first short film, The Lost Explorer (BBC Films, 2010) was premiered at Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland.

Walker’s Story Teller was exhibited at Somerset House in 2012 and published as a book by Thames and Hudson, designed by Ruth Ansel.

In 2013 The Bowes Museum in Durham exhibited Walker's photographs, curated by Greville Worthington, of work beyond the pages of Vogue and Vanity Fair.

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Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 4:44 AM

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Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Oleg Oprisco is a brilliantly talented photographer from Lviv, Ukraine, who creates stunning surreal images of elegant women in fairy-tale or dream-like settings. There’s one significant difference, however, that sets him apart from other artists who create similar work – Oprisco shoots using old-school film photography.

 

The fact that he shoots with film means that everything you see in these photos had to be created that way – it couldn’t be done digitally. “I’ve found it ideal to do everything myself. I come up with a concept, create the clothing, choose the location and direct the hair and makeup,” Oprisco explained in an interview with Bored Panda. “Before shooting, I plan the overall color scheme. According to the chosen palette, I select clothes, props, location, etc, making sure that all of it plays within a single color range.” He uses Kiev 6C and Kiev 88 cameras with medium-format film and a variety of lenses.

 

It’s clear that Oprisco is deeply passionate about his work. “Each of my photos is a scene from real life. That is the perfect source of inspiration for me as there is so much beauty to it.” Oprisco offered some inspiring advice for aspiring young photographers mixed in with some tough love as well. “Drop your job and shoot … if you feel that’s what you want,” he said. “Freedom, happiness, money… all will come after you let go and just shoot.”

 

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 13, 11:52 PM

Oleg Oprisco es un fotógrafo brillante talento de Lviv, Ucrania, que crea impresionantes imágenes surrealistas de las mujeres elegantes de cuento de hadas o ajustes de ensueño. Hay una diferencia significativa, sin embargo, que lo diferencia de otros artistas que crean un trabajo similar - Oprisco dispara usando la vieja escuela de fotografía de la película. 

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop

SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Amit and Naroop are London-based photographers specialising in music and advertising, but their latest series Singh is focused on a portraits of a very different kind. Taking the most powerful symbols of the Sikh faith, the pair have photographed a group of British Sikh men from all walks of life, and focusing on the traditional turban and beard, celebrated them in all of their diverse fashions.

They explain: “Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.”

Photographed with all of Amit and Naroop’s characteristic bright colours, glamour and polished finish, the series is an admiring portrait of the changing face of tradition in the UK. Lovely!

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Paula Silva's comment, March 3, 11:57 PM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 4:45 AM

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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash

Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation. 17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age groups are engaged in economic activities. Many of these children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. Factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.- Gmb Akash

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Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald

Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
MIAMI har gennem årtier været et yndet tilflugtssted for vidt forskellige befolkningsgrupper. ”A melting pot of cultures” kalder de lokale byen. Kendt for at huse ældre amerikanere, de såkaldte ”snowbirds”, som flytter hertil i alderdom- men for at få opfyldt pensionistdrømmen. Og for hvert år at indvaderes af tusindvis af unge collegestuderende, som tager hertil for at feste vildt og holde Spring Break. Miami er på mange måder en slags Latinamerikas hovedstad. Ja mange mener ikke egentlig ikke, at byen er en rigtig del af USA. 70 procent af byens befolkning er hispanics og taler spansk, mens de hvide udgør en minoritet. Med solskin og varme året rundt er denne smeltedigel en speciel og tiltrækkende magnet for mange grupper: immigran- ter, der søger politisk asyl, folk, der vil opleve den amerikanske drøm, og rige, der vil nyde livet i dette dragende paradis. En ting er fælles for alle de forskellige grupper, der søger her til: De søger det gode liv.
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AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay

For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Fortune Cookie was researched over the course of two years and created with more than one hundred and sixty hours of meticulous retouching in collaboration with Visual Box. Styling was done by Pascal & Jérémie. In this magical realm, the imaginative mind runs free, suspending rational thought if only for a moment. 

Photo report's insight:

To see Fortune Cookie  : Click on "Fashion" button, then "Editorial" and "Fortune Cookie"

 

Gear: Canon 5D MARK II

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LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mortality is an irrevocable fact of life, yet when inevitable reminders of it surface it can be earth shattering. When Hanoi-based photographer Maika Elan‘s father was in treatment for cancer, Elan was suddenly thrust into the role of adult during his treatment. In order to keep his spirits up during this process, Elan took her father to the same park he took her to as a child, photographing him and even playing with him as he used to with her. In her World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass project statement, Elan says, “I think it’s my turn to do something for my father, as he has done for me in the past. We both went back to the same park and played like old days. I hope these pictures I make will be a big motivation for him. I hope they let him see that he is not as sick as he feels. In my heart, he is always a happy person and full of optimism.” As of now, Elan’s father has recovered enough that he has been able to return to work. That he gets a kick out of seeing his daughter’s photos of him disseminating through the ether seems to indicate her ploy to brighten his spirits worked.

Photo report's insight:

Maika Elan (Nguyen Thanh Hai) was born in Vietnam, and lives and works in Hanoi. After taking a BA in sociology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in 2006, Maika started to use the camera to document her daily and private life. She soon turned to professional photography, working for editorial clients and fashion firms in Vietnam. In 2010, she took up documentary photography.

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Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

 

He was born in Ventura County, California on October 21, 1962. He first studied photography and the darkroom process starting in 1971 while a member of his local 4-H club. In 1979, while still a high school senior, he began working full time in the motion picture special effects industry in the area of miniature construction and design. He went on to study photography at Moorpark College, in California. After receiving an associates arts degree there, he entered the documentary studies program atLudwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, focusing mainly on narrative photojournalism.

 

In 1986, he began his career in photography as a photojournalist in his home town in Ventura County, at the Thousand Oaks News Chronicle. After winning several local awards for his work, he moved to New York City, where magazine assignments came rapidly. In 1991, he moved to Los Angeles and married Kathryn Fouts, who became his photo rep and studio manager. In 1993, his son Dylan was born in Los Angeles. In 2000, while maintaining a home in LA, he moved to Austin, Texas. There he set up a studio outside Austin in a historic building built in 1903, that had originally served as a general store, gas station and post office for nearly 100 years before he arrived.

 

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leonardo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

 

 

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A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano

A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For A New Kind Of Beauty, London-based photographer Phillip Toledano photographs individuals who have invested in numerous plastic surgeries. His sitters, having built their bodies in the image of some unknowable, personal ideal, are perhaps signifiers of a new dawn of physical expression. The subjects of the work, some of whom have gained national celebrity for their appearances, exude an intense eroticism, one that is alternately uncomfortable and exhilarating.

Toledano, inspired by the 16th century painter Hans Holbein, is drawn to the sculptural, highlighting the sensuous curves of the body in luscious reds, blacks, and creamy nudes.

 

Toledano’s subjects might at first appear as if carved from marble, cold or detached in their statuesque form, but the beauty of the work lies in questioning that impulse to judge; what, after all, defines a face as warm, emotive and human? Says the photographer, “In some ways I think that the subjects of [A New Kind of Beauty] are the vanguard of human evolution. Twenty years ago tattoos and piercing were considered fringe at best, outlandish at worse. And now they’re both quite mainstream. I think that in 40 or 50 years, when plastic surgery is cheap and prevalent, what it means to look human may be very different from what it means to look human today.”

 

Toledano views beauty as a sort of currency; if all can afford to surgically alter the exterior self, are we no longer reliant on our genetics, and do we then begin to have a more democratic society? Or do we simply move further away from our truest individual selves? One image of a young man, his head wrapped in cloth, much resembles Jack-Louis David’s painting of French Revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat. Are these individuals, then, revolutionaries, paving the way for “a new kind of beauty?” Take a look.

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Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On dit que la photographie et plus récemment le téléphone portable ont favorisé le boom de l’autoportrait. Sans aucun doute. Ce que moi je peux vous affirmer, c’est que l’autoportrait peut-être une agréable récréation à laquelle j’aimerai vous convier. 

Je me plais dans une photo quand j’en suis le photographe.  J’aime me photographier en très gros plan, en plan moyen, couché, assis, debout. Que l’on ne se méprenne pas sur mes intentions. Je vous vois venir avec vos gros sabots pour me sermonner sur l’égocentrisme. On se trompe sur l’autoportrait. Il se trouve à mille lieux de l’exercice narcissique. D’aucuns, bourrés de poncifs comme une dinde de Noël l’est de marrons, envisageraient l’approche de l’autoportrait comme l’avatar du divan freudien. Je ne l’ai pas assez gros sur la patate pour m’éplucher le nombril à ce point.  Faut se détendre. L’autoportrait, c’est aussi un jeu. Un moyen sympa pour s’affranchir de l’authenticité. Pour s’évader de soi. Comment ?

 

Depuis que je suis môme, j’ai toujours eu tendance à faire des grimaces devant mon miroir. Quelque part, je raillais mon image. C’est ainsi que j’aborde la pratique de l’autoportrait : comme une déconstruction ludique de soi. Un pur jeu visuel qui pousse la représentation de soi-même jusqu’à l’ironie.

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 4:44 AM

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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