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Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS)

Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS) | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Ninety miles from America and roughly the size of Pennsylvania the totalitarian communist state of Cuba is home to more than eleven million people.  A multiracial society with a population of mainly Spanish origins and Catholic faith, Cuba boasts one of the best health care systems in the world with the average life expectancy comparable to the UK while it's average monthly salary is only $20.00.  Prolonged austerity and the state controlled economy's insufficiency in providing adequate services and goods have forced an estimated 40% of Cubans to turn to the black market in order to obtain necessary clothing, food and household items.  Historically, Cuban law subordinates it's people from freedom of movement, speech, assembly and the press.  However, efforts by the government for economic and social reform have recently loosened some of the constraints on travel, real estate and business creating a mixture of excitement and trepidation in the Cuban people." - Susi Eggenberger

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Susi Eggenberger is an independent documentary photographer based in Southern Maine and is available for assignment.

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Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

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BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The wigmen of the Huli people aren’t like Western toupee manufacturers. They are wizards who only work with people who have fine heads of hair. What a traditional wigman does is use ancient magic to make hair grow faster than normal so it can be cut off and turned into a wig. Evidently, magic – like hair restorer – doesn’t work if the hair is long gone." - Jimmy Nelson

Photo report's insight:

Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. 

 

In 2009 Nelson started to work on his biggest project to-date, Before they Pass Away. He travelled for 3 years and photographed more than 35 indigenous tribes around the world in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the South Pacific, using a 50-year-old 4x5in camera.[5] Nelson said that the project was "inspired by Edward Sheriff Curtis and his great photographs of Native Americans". The tribes that Nelson photographed include the Huli and Kalam tribes of New Guinea, the Tsaatan of Mongolia and the Mursi people of the Omo River valley in southern Ethiopia. Jimmy borrowed the funds from a Dutch billionaire, Marcel Boekhoorn.

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl

REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With 'Rek' (stretch in Dutch) I explore the aesthetic possibilities of the human skin through a mixture of image capturing techniques. By manipulating this curious stretchable material with various low budget materials like nylon fishing rope and cello tape I am able to temporarily shape it into surprising textures and shapes. Highlighting not only it’s flexibility and adaptability but also it’s function as our own biological upholstery that aside from it’s protective capabilities could also serve as a medium for aesthetic expression, possibly in the form of a dress less fashion.- 

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Heidi Spencer's curator insight, February 4, 8:32 AM

I chose this website because, this photographer "Juuke Schoorl" have very clear pictures that i could use as a good example of a good picture taken by a great photographer.

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India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures. 

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Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L.

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Beyond is a documentary by filmmaker Cale Glendening which follows my assistant Ryan and I as we complete our latest photo series in Varanasi, India- "Holy Men." Although not much technical information is discussed in this particular featurette, my goal is to inspire you and give you insight into what goes into one of my personal projects. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation.Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion." - JOEY L.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:27 PM

The video/pictures are very cool and interesting to see. You get to see what the people go threw. Although its not very much an educational purpose to this, you get to see the work that this artist did. Job well done.

Lensicle's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:32 AM

Amazing shot!

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10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

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Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald

Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
39-year old Bonnie is a danish mother of three. Since the age of 18, she has been working as a prostitute. Her first time having sex for money was at a visit at a brothel in a small town. Bonnie and her friend were in need of money and tried it out.

 

The experience was unpleasant and Bonnie was shy and ashamed of her body. But because of the money, she kept working. Bonnie has a house In a small village in Sealand. Here she works everyday from 9-4. When her day is over she picks up her kids and goes home to her real house in another nearby village. Her oldest daughter Michella (16) has her own apartment and her son Oliver (14) lives at home. 6-year old Noa, Bonnies youngest son, thinks his mother has a job as a cleaning lady.

 

The older children know what her profession is, and so does their school, the community and so on. It is not easy for Oliver and Michella and Michella has been called names and asked how much her mother costs. That made her very upset. Bonnie pays taxes and is registered as a business. Although she is in trouble with the IRS and has been to prison more than once. The single most important thing in Bonnie's life is her children." - MARIE HALD

 

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Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz

Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Menya’s Kids, French photographer Myriam Abdelaziz bears witness to the child labor that persists in the limestone quarries of the city. Situated along the Nile River’s western bank, Menya is host to over 300 quarries employing an estimated 15,000 individuals, many of whom are children who have left school in hopes of pulling their families out of poverty.

 

From the inexperienced age of ten, youngsters enter the quarries to collect bricks carved from the mines, facing both short and longterm dangers. Many are killed or electrocuted by elementary machinery, their limbs severed by the stone-cutting blades. Others face lifelong respiratory illness from limestone dust inhalation. For a $15 weekly salary, the kids awake at dawn and are shuttled to the worksites in darkness so as to avoid the brutal heat of midday. In summer, the temperatures exceed 100 degrees fahrenheit, and the children work from 4:00 in the afternoon to 3:00 in the morning. In the winter, they work in below freezing temperatures from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM, with little protection from the elements.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Tim Walker Photography

Tim Walker Photography | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Timothy "Tim" Walker is a British fashion photographer, who regularly shoots for Vogue, W Magazine and LOVE Magazine.  

After graduating in 1994, Walker worked as a freelance photography assistant in London before moving to New York City as a full time assistant to Richard Avedon. On returning to England, he initially concentrated on portrait and documentary work for UK newspapers. At the age of 25, he shot his first fashion story for Vogue.

Walker staged his first major exhibition at the Design Museum, London in 2008. This coincided with the release of his book ‘PICTURES’ published by teNeues.

In 2010 Walker’s first short film, The Lost Explorer (BBC Films, 2010) was premiered at Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland.

Walker’s Story Teller was exhibited at Somerset House in 2012 and published as a book by Thames and Hudson, designed by Ruth Ansel.

In 2013 The Bowes Museum in Durham exhibited Walker's photographs, curated by Greville Worthington, of work beyond the pages of Vogue and Vanity Fair.

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Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

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Turkman Gate | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Turkman Gate | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture.

Photo report's insight:

In my opinion, this muslim district is very quiet and cool. People are very polite. I met there a layer, Muhammed Bhatt. He feels that Turkaman Gate is a very safe area for women, which is one major reason why she prefers to stay here. Women can move out even late at night without feeling unsafe or uncomfortable as it is crowded till late night. For muslims and hindouist women, Turkaman Gate is of the safest areas of Delhi. Also, Muhammed Bhatt thinks that Turkman Gate is very well connected, as it is centrally located and is close to both ITO and Connaught Place.


From security’s point of view, he says, Muslims feel safe staying together, as it also provides a sense of ‘apna’ culture.Turkman Gate is located to the southern edge of Shahajahanabad, is named after the Sufi Saint Hazrat Shah Turkman Bayabani. Turkman Gate neighborhood’s Muslim population forms a part of the often labeled Jama Masjidghetto. People are not very rich.


The Old city’s infrastructure is crumbling under the pressures of a growing population, which has grown manifold since the time of its inception. The basic requirements of a growing city, like parking spaces/parks, etc. do not exist. If a four wheeler enters the neighborhood, it results in chaos and traffic jams. Roads are narrow, as most of the shops and houses have encroached on the main road leading to congestion. There is hardly any greenery as every inch of open space is inhabited. It resembles a concrete jungle. - Serge Bouvet

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BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova

BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet

Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

En photographie, je dirai même plus dans la vie tout court, la première impression va se jouer dans un laps de temps fugace, le temps d’un claquement de doigt. A l’issu de cette première impression, il sera possible ou non d’établir un lien avec votre sujet si vous êtes photographe, votre client potentiel si vous êtes un businessman ou votre futur dulcinée si vous êtes amoureux. Les rouages d’une relation sont les mêmes pour tous. En quelques lignes, je vous délivre les clés d’une prise de contact réussie. 

 

Chaque étape de la vie apporte ses leçons et elles tournent toutes autour d’une rencontre. La qualité d’un service, la puissance d’une culture d’entreprise, l’importance d’une part de marché, la communication, la qualité d’une bonne photo en ce qui me concerne à plus d’un titre, dépendent de deux facteurs : les gens et votre faculté à entrer en relation avec eux. La prise de contact n’est pas si compliquée mais demande un peu de… Oh pas grand chose… Des principes très basiques. J’ai appelé ces principes de bases : les Sésames de la convivialité.

 

Ces Sésames sont les préalables nécessaires qui vont déterminer la confiance, l’accessibilité de votre interlocuteur. La création d’un lien avec une personne suit un processus simple : la confiance se développe au niveau des instincts de base, puis le lien entre les personnalité s’établit, débouchant sur une relation qui sera le Sésame d’un monde de possibilités infinis.

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Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Chances are you already know Steve McCurry as the man who took one of the most iconic photos of our time. It was of a 12-year-old Afghan refugee girl who’s piercing green eyes told us her harrowing story. The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the National Geographic magazine and her face became famous as the cover photograph on their June 1985 issue. Beyond just that one photo, McCurry has shot over a million images spanning 35 years. More than anything, he is one of a few that has that amazing ability to capture stories of our shared human experience. As he says,


“Most of my images are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”


"Looking through his large body of work, we get to experience fantastic faraway places we can only dream about visiting. It’s in his incredible photos that we feel connected to the world at large, appreciating our similarities and our differences, our cultures and our histories, and our past and our present in a truly unique and inspiring way."

 

"To develop this project, the first thing I did was simply to observe the life of people in this part of the world. Through photogenic documentation, I wanted to tell what I had seen, how the farmers grow and harvest the coffee, and their lifestyle. I tried to show their daily habits, I entered their homes and went to the plantations, I wandered through the villages and let the images scroll in front of my eyes, to tell of the faces, the stories and the atmosphere." - Steve McCurry

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 3:17 PM

This imagination is rare i wish i could think outside the box like this painting.

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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash

Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation. 17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age groups are engaged in economic activities. Many of these children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. Factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.- Gmb Akash

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Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald

Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
MIAMI har gennem årtier været et yndet tilflugtssted for vidt forskellige befolkningsgrupper. ”A melting pot of cultures” kalder de lokale byen. Kendt for at huse ældre amerikanere, de såkaldte ”snowbirds”, som flytter hertil i alderdom- men for at få opfyldt pensionistdrømmen. Og for hvert år at indvaderes af tusindvis af unge collegestuderende, som tager hertil for at feste vildt og holde Spring Break. Miami er på mange måder en slags Latinamerikas hovedstad. Ja mange mener ikke egentlig ikke, at byen er en rigtig del af USA. 70 procent af byens befolkning er hispanics og taler spansk, mens de hvide udgør en minoritet. Med solskin og varme året rundt er denne smeltedigel en speciel og tiltrækkende magnet for mange grupper: immigran- ter, der søger politisk asyl, folk, der vil opleve den amerikanske drøm, og rige, der vil nyde livet i dette dragende paradis. En ting er fælles for alle de forskellige grupper, der søger her til: De søger det gode liv.
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AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 2014 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay

For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Fortune Cookie was researched over the course of two years and created with more than one hundred and sixty hours of meticulous retouching in collaboration with Visual Box. Styling was done by Pascal & Jérémie. In this magical realm, the imaginative mind runs free, suspending rational thought if only for a moment. 

Photo report's insight:

To see Fortune Cookie  : Click on "Fashion" button, then "Editorial" and "Fortune Cookie"

 

Gear: Canon 5D MARK II

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 3:24 PM

This is a creative way of showing conflict and unity in the world of fashion.

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LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mortality is an irrevocable fact of life, yet when inevitable reminders of it surface it can be earth shattering. When Hanoi-based photographer Maika Elan‘s father was in treatment for cancer, Elan was suddenly thrust into the role of adult during his treatment. In order to keep his spirits up during this process, Elan took her father to the same park he took her to as a child, photographing him and even playing with him as he used to with her. In her World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass project statement, Elan says, “I think it’s my turn to do something for my father, as he has done for me in the past. We both went back to the same park and played like old days. I hope these pictures I make will be a big motivation for him. I hope they let him see that he is not as sick as he feels. In my heart, he is always a happy person and full of optimism.” As of now, Elan’s father has recovered enough that he has been able to return to work. That he gets a kick out of seeing his daughter’s photos of him disseminating through the ether seems to indicate her ploy to brighten his spirits worked.

Photo report's insight:

Maika Elan (Nguyen Thanh Hai) was born in Vietnam, and lives and works in Hanoi. After taking a BA in sociology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in 2006, Maika started to use the camera to document her daily and private life. She soon turned to professional photography, working for editorial clients and fashion firms in Vietnam. In 2010, she took up documentary photography.

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Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

 

He was born in Ventura County, California on October 21, 1962. He first studied photography and the darkroom process starting in 1971 while a member of his local 4-H club. In 1979, while still a high school senior, he began working full time in the motion picture special effects industry in the area of miniature construction and design. He went on to study photography at Moorpark College, in California. After receiving an associates arts degree there, he entered the documentary studies program atLudwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, focusing mainly on narrative photojournalism.

 

In 1986, he began his career in photography as a photojournalist in his home town in Ventura County, at the Thousand Oaks News Chronicle. After winning several local awards for his work, he moved to New York City, where magazine assignments came rapidly. In 1991, he moved to Los Angeles and married Kathryn Fouts, who became his photo rep and studio manager. In 1993, his son Dylan was born in Los Angeles. In 2000, while maintaining a home in LA, he moved to Austin, Texas. There he set up a studio outside Austin in a historic building built in 1903, that had originally served as a general store, gas station and post office for nearly 100 years before he arrived.

 

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leonardo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

 

 

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