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Le danseur de Kacchi ghodi | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Le danseur de Kacchi ghodi | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The travel photographer, Serge Bouvet, met this danser of Kachhi Ghodi in Kathputli Colony Slum (new Delhi). Bandit areas of Shekhawati have been behind the origin of this dance varieties. It is carried out to entertain the bridegroom and his escorts in a marriage party. Elaborate costumes are worn by the performers, which helps make them appear as if they are riding on horseback. Brandishing of swords, lively sidestepping and pirouetting to the songs and drums are made use of in the Kachhi Ghodi dance of Rajasthan.

 

Kachi Godi derives its name from the work Ghoodi meaning ‘mare’.

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Camera: Canon 5D Mark II

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay

For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Fortune Cookie was researched over the course of two years and created with more than one hundred and sixty hours of meticulous retouching in collaboration with Visual Box. Styling was done by Pascal & Jérémie. In this magical realm, the imaginative mind runs free, suspending rational thought if only for a moment. 

Photo report's insight:

To see Fortune Cookie  : Click on "Fashion" button, then "Editorial" and "Fortune Cookie"

 

Gear: Canon 5D MARK II

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Tim Walker Photography

Tim Walker Photography | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Timothy "Tim" Walker is a British fashion photographer, who regularly shoots for Vogue, W Magazine and LOVE Magazine.  

After graduating in 1994, Walker worked as a freelance photography assistant in London before moving to New York City as a full time assistant to Richard Avedon. On returning to England, he initially concentrated on portrait and documentary work for UK newspapers. At the age of 25, he shot his first fashion story for Vogue.

Walker staged his first major exhibition at the Design Museum, London in 2008. This coincided with the release of his book ‘PICTURES’ published by teNeues.

In 2010 Walker’s first short film, The Lost Explorer (BBC Films, 2010) was premiered at Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland.

Walker’s Story Teller was exhibited at Somerset House in 2012 and published as a book by Thames and Hudson, designed by Ruth Ansel.

In 2013 The Bowes Museum in Durham exhibited Walker's photographs, curated by Greville Worthington, of work beyond the pages of Vogue and Vanity Fair.

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Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Oleg Oprisco is a brilliantly talented photographer from Lviv, Ukraine, who creates stunning surreal images of elegant women in fairy-tale or dream-like settings. There’s one significant difference, however, that sets him apart from other artists who create similar work – Oprisco shoots using old-school film photography.

 

The fact that he shoots with film means that everything you see in these photos had to be created that way – it couldn’t be done digitally. “I’ve found it ideal to do everything myself. I come up with a concept, create the clothing, choose the location and direct the hair and makeup,” Oprisco explained in an interview with Bored Panda. “Before shooting, I plan the overall color scheme. According to the chosen palette, I select clothes, props, location, etc, making sure that all of it plays within a single color range.” He uses Kiev 6C and Kiev 88 cameras with medium-format film and a variety of lenses.

 

It’s clear that Oprisco is deeply passionate about his work. “Each of my photos is a scene from real life. That is the perfect source of inspiration for me as there is so much beauty to it.” Oprisco offered some inspiring advice for aspiring young photographers mixed in with some tough love as well. “Drop your job and shoot … if you feel that’s what you want,” he said. “Freedom, happiness, money… all will come after you let go and just shoot.”

 

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 13, 11:52 PM

Oleg Oprisco es un fotógrafo brillante talento de Lviv, Ucrania, que crea impresionantes imágenes surrealistas de las mujeres elegantes de cuento de hadas o ajustes de ensueño. Hay una diferencia significativa, sin embargo, que lo diferencia de otros artistas que crean un trabajo similar - Oprisco dispara usando la vieja escuela de fotografía de la película. 

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop

SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Amit and Naroop are London-based photographers specialising in music and advertising, but their latest series Singh is focused on a portraits of a very different kind. Taking the most powerful symbols of the Sikh faith, the pair have photographed a group of British Sikh men from all walks of life, and focusing on the traditional turban and beard, celebrated them in all of their diverse fashions.

They explain: “Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.”

Photographed with all of Amit and Naroop’s characteristic bright colours, glamour and polished finish, the series is an admiring portrait of the changing face of tradition in the UK. Lovely!

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Paula Silva's comment, March 3, 11:57 PM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On that day, early in the morning many garment workers walked into the factories of Rana Plaza, their working place. Within an hour everything was shattered. Nobody knows how many workers were running to save his or her lives at the end moment. Workers’ scream echoed on the walls of Rana Plaza. Many of their voices could not reach out passing through the heavy concrete walls. Over a thousand workers lost their lives in the deathtrap. They are the cheapest labors of the world. They are not only numbers; they are human beings.

 

Who could imagine the collapse that caused the most unacceptable fate for the cheapest labors from Bangladesh? 24th April 2013, 9am. Becoming a brutal incident of history, a nine-story commercial building Rana Plaza collapsed at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh and left more than 1134 workers dead, more than hundred missing and many other wounded. Around a thousand families have found dead bodies of their beloved family members. - Taslima Akhter

Photo report's insight:

About photo of two victims amid the rubble of the garment factory collapse, Taslima Akhter was selected for the 3rd prize singles of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/40ISO: 1600F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mmCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II


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World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST

World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
2014 PHOTO CONTEST

The World Press Photo of the Year 2013 is a picture by American photographer John Stanmeyer.

Judging
An international jury of leading professionals in the field of photojournalism worldwide began judging the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 1 February.

Results
The results of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest were announced on 14 February. The prize-winning pictures will be presented in a year-long exhibition that travels through more than 100 cities in over 45 countries, to start in Amsterdam in De Nieuwe Kerk on 18 April 2014.

Prizes
The jury awarded first, second and third prizes in nine categories. First-prize winners receive a cash prize of €1,500. The premier award carries a cash prize of €10,000. In addition, Canon will donate a professional DSLR camera and lens kit to the author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013. The annual Awards Days, a two-day celebration of the prizewinners, takes place in Amsterdam on 24 and 25 April 2014.

Photo report's insight:
View the entire collection of winning images from the 57th World Press Photo Contest. The winners were selected from more than 90,000 images submitted to the contest. 
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Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters

Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Attention images choquantes. Scène d'extrême violence à Bangui. Soupçonné d'être un combattant de la Seleka, l'armée des rebelles, un homme a été accusé, tué puis mutilé par les FACA (Forces armées centrafricaines). Cet évènement terrible a eu lieu quelques minutes après la venue de la Présidente par intérim, Catherine Samba Panza au Collège National de l'administration et de la magistrature. Elle y demandait le retour de l'ordre et la renaissance de l'armée nationale. - Paris Match

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Seven minutes only for portrait of François Hollande | Photographer :Marco Grob

Seven minutes only for portrait of François Hollande | Photographer :Marco Grob | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On Friday, January 31, we arrived at the Élysée Palace in Paris to photograph the French President François Hollande for TIME’s cover. We prepared four different set ups: A black background, a white background and two locations within the palace that would make for strong environmental shots. The key on a shoot like this is to be really well prepared. My crew moves like a ballet, so the portrait session kind of has this flow.

When the president walked in, he was pressed for time. After initial introductions, I normally don’t interact much, so the relationship is between the subject and the camera. This gives me a much more authentic picture.

 

We only had seven minutes to make the two different studio portraits, one of those ended up on the cover of TIME International. I was also able to sneak in the two environmental pictures, which both ran in the magazine.

There are different ways to get a good portrait. There are a lot of photographers who have a much different approach. But my subjects often don’t have time to get used to the fact that they’re being photographed. Which probably adds some immediacy.



Read more: Meeting François Hollande: Behind TIME’s Cover with Marco Grob - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2014/02/06/francois-hollande-time-cover/#ixzz2suxaeGU9


Photo report's insight:

More about great job of Marco Grob: http://www.marcogrob.com/work

Marco Grob is a contract photographer for TIME. He previously photographed major figures from the civil rights movement for One Dream, TIME’s multimedia commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. 


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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Nature morte | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Nature morte | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Petit aparté pour vous causer d'un sujet que j'aborde rarement, la nature morte. Cette discipline picturale au départ avait la vocation de représenter des éléments inanimés. En photographie, on tentera de mettre en valeur le sujet grâce à la composition, au décor, à la lumière et à la mise en scène générale. (...)

"Il est entendu que la composition, la lumière et le décor sont primordiaux. Vos talents de décorateurs vont être mise à contribution. A la différence d'autres discipline de la photographie, ici, vous allez devoir agir sur la scène à photographier. La composition sera bien entendu tributaire du cadrage opéré mais aussi de la manière dont vous allez animer vos objets. Délicatesse, poésie et esprit Fen shui. Faites vibrer la fibre féminine qui est en vous. Pour mener à bien la réalisation de votre nature morte, vous allez devoir mettre en place le ou les objets, les agencer judicieusement dans un souci esthétique et harmonieux. "

 

"La nature morte consiste à mettre en relief le sujet grâce au décor. L'arrière-plan et le support sur lequel repose vos sujets ne sont pas à choisir au hasard. Les couleurs, la matière doivent être en harmonie avec les caractéristiques du sujet photographié. A titre d'exemple, je souhaitais photographier des feuilles de verveines et des graines de fenouil. J'ai réfléchi aux connotations que pouvaient m'évoquer ces éléments comme la nature, le naturel,  la simplicité, le bois, la chaleur, la couleur verte, la quiétude, la retraite, la campagne, l'ancienneté, etc. J'ai donc, utilisé comme support, une vieille table en bois très abîmé, de vieux livres aux pages jaunis, un plateau de bois... Par chance, les couleurs des uns et des autres s'harmonisaient aisément" - Serge BOUVET

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LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mortality is an irrevocable fact of life, yet when inevitable reminders of it surface it can be earth shattering. When Hanoi-based photographer Maika Elan‘s father was in treatment for cancer, Elan was suddenly thrust into the role of adult during his treatment. In order to keep his spirits up during this process, Elan took her father to the same park he took her to as a child, photographing him and even playing with him as he used to with her. In her World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass project statement, Elan says, “I think it’s my turn to do something for my father, as he has done for me in the past. We both went back to the same park and played like old days. I hope these pictures I make will be a big motivation for him. I hope they let him see that he is not as sick as he feels. In my heart, he is always a happy person and full of optimism.” As of now, Elan’s father has recovered enough that he has been able to return to work. That he gets a kick out of seeing his daughter’s photos of him disseminating through the ether seems to indicate her ploy to brighten his spirits worked.

Photo report's insight:

Maika Elan (Nguyen Thanh Hai) was born in Vietnam, and lives and works in Hanoi. After taking a BA in sociology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in 2006, Maika started to use the camera to document her daily and private life. She soon turned to professional photography, working for editorial clients and fashion firms in Vietnam. In 2010, she took up documentary photography.

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Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

 

He was born in Ventura County, California on October 21, 1962. He first studied photography and the darkroom process starting in 1971 while a member of his local 4-H club. In 1979, while still a high school senior, he began working full time in the motion picture special effects industry in the area of miniature construction and design. He went on to study photography at Moorpark College, in California. After receiving an associates arts degree there, he entered the documentary studies program atLudwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, focusing mainly on narrative photojournalism.

 

In 1986, he began his career in photography as a photojournalist in his home town in Ventura County, at the Thousand Oaks News Chronicle. After winning several local awards for his work, he moved to New York City, where magazine assignments came rapidly. In 1991, he moved to Los Angeles and married Kathryn Fouts, who became his photo rep and studio manager. In 1993, his son Dylan was born in Los Angeles. In 2000, while maintaining a home in LA, he moved to Austin, Texas. There he set up a studio outside Austin in a historic building built in 1903, that had originally served as a general store, gas station and post office for nearly 100 years before he arrived.

 

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leonardo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

 

 

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A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano

A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For A New Kind Of Beauty, London-based photographer Phillip Toledano photographs individuals who have invested in numerous plastic surgeries. His sitters, having built their bodies in the image of some unknowable, personal ideal, are perhaps signifiers of a new dawn of physical expression. The subjects of the work, some of whom have gained national celebrity for their appearances, exude an intense eroticism, one that is alternately uncomfortable and exhilarating.

Toledano, inspired by the 16th century painter Hans Holbein, is drawn to the sculptural, highlighting the sensuous curves of the body in luscious reds, blacks, and creamy nudes.

 

Toledano’s subjects might at first appear as if carved from marble, cold or detached in their statuesque form, but the beauty of the work lies in questioning that impulse to judge; what, after all, defines a face as warm, emotive and human? Says the photographer, “In some ways I think that the subjects of [A New Kind of Beauty] are the vanguard of human evolution. Twenty years ago tattoos and piercing were considered fringe at best, outlandish at worse. And now they’re both quite mainstream. I think that in 40 or 50 years, when plastic surgery is cheap and prevalent, what it means to look human may be very different from what it means to look human today.”

 

Toledano views beauty as a sort of currency; if all can afford to surgically alter the exterior self, are we no longer reliant on our genetics, and do we then begin to have a more democratic society? Or do we simply move further away from our truest individual selves? One image of a young man, his head wrapped in cloth, much resembles Jack-Louis David’s painting of French Revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat. Are these individuals, then, revolutionaries, paving the way for “a new kind of beauty?” Take a look.

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Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On dit que la photographie et plus récemment le téléphone portable ont favorisé le boom de l’autoportrait. Sans aucun doute. Ce que moi je peux vous affirmer, c’est que l’autoportrait peut-être une agréable récréation à laquelle j’aimerai vous convier. 

Je me plais dans une photo quand j’en suis le photographe.  J’aime me photographier en très gros plan, en plan moyen, couché, assis, debout. Que l’on ne se méprenne pas sur mes intentions. Je vous vois venir avec vos gros sabots pour me sermonner sur l’égocentrisme. On se trompe sur l’autoportrait. Il se trouve à mille lieux de l’exercice narcissique. D’aucuns, bourrés de poncifs comme une dinde de Noël l’est de marrons, envisageraient l’approche de l’autoportrait comme l’avatar du divan freudien. Je ne l’ai pas assez gros sur la patate pour m’éplucher le nombril à ce point.  Faut se détendre. L’autoportrait, c’est aussi un jeu. Un moyen sympa pour s’affranchir de l’authenticité. Pour s’évader de soi. Comment ?

 

Depuis que je suis môme, j’ai toujours eu tendance à faire des grimaces devant mon miroir. Quelque part, je raillais mon image. C’est ainsi que j’aborde la pratique de l’autoportrait : comme une déconstruction ludique de soi. Un pur jeu visuel qui pousse la représentation de soi-même jusqu’à l’ironie.

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest

OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

OCCUPIED PLEASURES

03 June 2013

A woman in Gaza without a travel permit marches through the silent dark of an underground tunnel on her way to a party in Egypt, clutching a bouquet of flowers.

More than four million Palestinians live in the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem, where the political situation regularly intrudes upon the most mundane of moments. People’s movements are circumscribed and the threat of violence often hangs overhead. This is an exploration of the small moments of pleasure where ordinary men and women demonstrate a desire to live, not just simply survive.

Photo report's insight:

Tanya Habjouqa was born in Jordan and educated in the United States, receiving her masters in Global Media and Middle East Politics from the University of London SOAS. Beginning her career in Texas, she documented Mexican migrant communities and urban poverty before returning to the Middle East.

Tanya is known for gaining unique access to sensitive gender, social, and human rights stories in the Middle East. She is a freelance photographer, features writer, and a founding member of the Rawiya photo collective (founded by five female photographers from across the Middle East).

She is a recipient of the Magnum Foundation 2013 Emergency Fund for her project ‘Occupied Pleasures’.

Habjouqa has worked on the front lines in Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, and Gaza. Her series ‘Women of Gaza’ is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Based in East Jerusalem, she is working on personal projects that explore socio-political dynamics, identity politics, occupation, and subcultures of the Levant.

 WORLD PRESS PHOTO INVOLVEMENTAward-winning photographer 2014 photo contest
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The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
“I wanted to be an artist by drawing and making handicraft but my dream is now ruined under the niddle of machine, under the rubble and sometimes by fire”- Lija a garment worker With a dream of living a better life million of workers from villages gather in workers barrack in cities. Lija, Modhumala, Shomapti, Masud, Brojesshwar are among them. Among more than 4 million workers 80% are women.  Surrounding the garment industries large workers barracks have grown in Bangladesh.  Workers toil from dawn to dusk for a minimum wage of BDT3000 taka a month (less than 37 $) till 2013.  Government declared a new gross minimum wage BDT 5300 ( near about $66) , which is not sufficient for them to survive. This 4 million workers are not more demanding. They don’t have any dream to have car-house, even any luxury item in life. They want only coarse rice-cloth and a little roof over the head to stay anyway. They want to send their children to school. They don’t want to send their children i
Photo report's insight:

 Taslima Akhter turned to documentary photography after many years as an activist with workers’ and women's rights organizations with whom she continues to work. She considers her documentary photography as a continuation of her activism. As a photographer, she likes to work on issues relating to gender, the environment and culture, as well as exploring spaces of social discrimination. Taslima's photo "Final Embrace" was selected as one of TIME Magazine’s top 10 photos of 2013.

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Animal | 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional

Animal | 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Take a look at the Sony World Photography Awards Galleries, where you will find exceptional photographs by some of the most talented photographers in the world. The photographers featured here are Sony World Photography Awards past winners, shortlisted or commended photographers.

 

Introducing the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional, Open and Youth Shortlists

Selected from 139,544 images from 166 countries, WPO today reveals the shortlist for the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards. The highest number of entries in the awards’ seven year history, this year’s jury selected an eclectic shortlist representing the very finest in international contemporary photography from 2013.

 

The judges found within the submissions many stories that force the viewer to find something surprising within the everyday.  Well-documented scenes were approached with fresh and ground-breaking photography styles and are set to inspire other photographers around the world. 

 

Photo report's insight:

Lion and cat : Photographer : George Logan
http://www.georgelogan.co.uk/ ;

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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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