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Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Chances are you already know Steve McCurry as the man who took one of the most iconic photos of our time. It was of a 12-year-old Afghan refugee girl who’s piercing green eyes told us her harrowing story. The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the National Geographic magazine and her face became famous as the cover photograph on their June 1985 issue. Beyond just that one photo, McCurry has shot over a million images spanning 35 years. More than anything, he is one of a few that has that amazing ability to capture stories of our shared human experience. As he says,


“Most of my images are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”


"Looking through his large body of work, we get to experience fantastic faraway places we can only dream about visiting. It’s in his incredible photos that we feel connected to the world at large, appreciating our similarities and our differences, our cultures and our histories, and our past and our present in a truly unique and inspiring way."

 

"To develop this project, the first thing I did was simply to observe the life of people in this part of the world. Through photogenic documentation, I wanted to tell what I had seen, how the farmers grow and harvest the coffee, and their lifestyle. I tried to show their daily habits, I entered their homes and went to the plantations, I wandered through the villages and let the images scroll in front of my eyes, to tell of the faces, the stories and the atmosphere." - Steve McCurry

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 3:17 PM

This imagination is rare i wish i could think outside the box like this painting.

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 2014 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva

Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Once upon a time in Siberia, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in a warm bed in a small town, a little girl woke up from a dream. It was morning, but it was still dark out, for the little town was so far North that the sun would not show itself for many months. They called this the Polar Night.

The little girl rubbed the sleep from her eyes and dressed in the dark. She put on her pink jacket and red stocking cap and stepped outside. Her breath froze and she walked in the direction of school. All around her were endless fields of frozen tundra. But the fields were not white like you might think, for up above the Aurora Borealis lit up the sky. It looked like a big green breath frozen in the heavens and all around the little girl were beautiful colors. The snow was painted green. And on some mornings—if she was lucky—she’d even see bits of blue, yellow and pink on her walk to school.

She loved these colors very much. Walking through them made her imagination come alive. She liked to think of the fields as blank canvases for Mother Nature to paint upon. And what did that make her? Was she part of the painting too, in her pink jacket and red hat?

She smiled and her mind began dreaming of the days when the Polar Night would come to an end, when the first sun would light up the snowy mountains, making it look like blueberry ice cream. And then the summer would come, the snow would melt and the tundra would transform into planet Mars with it’s golden color seeming to stretch out forever in every direction.

She thought to herself, “Every season has its own colors.” She stored all these colors in her heart, and walked beneath the Aurora Borealis in this little town way up North.

The town was called Tiksi. - 

 

Photo report's insight:

Evgenia Arbugaeva is one of 50 photographers in the Critical Mass 2011 exhibition Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness & Everything Else atPhoto Center NW. This exhibition, juried by Darius Himes, will also travel to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public.

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La danse Bhavai | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

La danse Bhavai | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The photographer Serge Bouvet met Bhavai dancer at the slum of Kathputli Colony (India, New Delhi). Bhavai is a genre of folk dance popular in Rajasthan state in western India. The male or female performers balance a number of earthen pots or brass pitchers as they dance nimbly, pirouetting and then swaying with the soles of their feet perched on the top of a glass, on the edge of the sword or on the rim of a brass thali (plate) during the performance.

The accompaniment to the dance is provided by the male performers singing melodious songs and playing a number of musical instruments, which include pakhwaja, dholak, jhanjhar, sarangi, and harmonium. 

Traditionally, this genre of dance was performed by the female performers belonging to the Jat, Bhil, Raigar, Meena, Kumhar, and Kalbelia communities of Rajasthan. It is assumed that this genre of dance was evolved from the exceptional balancing skills of the females of these communities developed to carry a number of pots of water on head over a long distance in the desert.

Photo report's insight:

CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark III

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Portraits | Steve McCurry

Portraits | Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

http://stevemccurry.com/galleries/portraits

"Most of us have seen Steve McCurry's National Geographic portrait of the Afghan girl pictured above. McCurry has the rare ability to capture extremely powerful images that stay branded in our minds, never to be forgotten.

The Philadelphia-born photographer has covered many areas of international and civil conflict, including the Iran-Iraq war, the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, Beirut, Cambodia, the Philippines, the Gulf War, and continuing coverage of Afghanistan. He focuses on the human consequences of war, not only showing what war impresses on the landscape, but rather, on the human face.

McCurry is driven by an innate curiosity and sense of wonder about the world and everyone in it. He has an uncanny ability to cross boundaries of language and culture to capture stories of human experience. “Most of my images are grounded in people," he says. "I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Kathputli Colony is a tinsel slum. Over 600 artists from here have represented India in several fairs and festivals abroad. About 800 families have settled here since Independence. Magicians, acrobats, mime artists, puppeteers, jugglers, folk singers, snake charmers, bear handlers, monkey trainers and other street performers reside in this colony. A visit to the colony is enough to believe that Shadipur Depot is perhaps the only place in Delhi where the ancient tradition of magic is preserved and inherited.

Most of the artists are from UP, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra. Kathputli Colony is also called by other names: Kalakaron ki Basti, Madari colony and Bazeegarcolony.

 

Serge Bouvet, French press photographer. Serge Bouvet is a Paris based Photographer and artist who lives, works and enjoys the fast paced lifestyle of the most important city in the world. Serge Bouvet specializes in editorial and   travel  photographs. He also has a passion for shooting still life and products and has been known to shoot highly stylized and creative portraits.

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A.A. Mangkling’s Ngaben | Documentary photographer: Tahnia Roberts.

A.A. Mangkling’s Ngaben | Documentary photographer: Tahnia Roberts. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Hindu-Balinese believe the body is impure, a temporary shell, having no significance at all, except as a container of the soul and its anchor to the earth. All thoughts at the time of death are concentrated upon the spirit and its passage to heaven. The body is just there to be disposed of, and, instead of grieving, the Balinese prefer to throw a great celebration, in the process hastening their dead friend’s soul to oneness with god." -Tahnia Roberts

 

Ngaben is the cremation ritual/ceremony performed in Bali to send the deceased to the next life. The bodies of the deceased are placed in elaborate sarcophagi, and cremated following rituals and ceremonies that are full of simultaneous solemn and joyous pomp. The Balinese believe that the deceased will either reincarnate or find final rest known as moksha, and that the bodies are temporary shells, considered impure.

Tahnia Roberts' Ngaben is a collection of photographs she made during the cremation of the late A.A. Mangkling, an elderly Balinese. 

Tahnia Roberts is a portrait and documentary photographer, originally from New Zealand, who is currently resident in SE Asia traveling extensively to experience authentic cultural activities of the region. 

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Religion and Life in Tigray | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich

Religion and Life in Tigray | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Ethiopian Church is one of the oldest in the world, dating back to 4th Century AD, when Orthodox Christianity was made the official religion of the Axumite Kingdom, present day Ethiopian region of Tigray. Over the centuries, Christianity has shaped the people's psyche, as well as the landscape of Tigray, where hundreds of churches and monasteries have been erected and even carved right into mountain faces, so abundant in the region.

 

Modern-day Tigray has been at the cross roads of natural disasters, conflict and political turmoil. These difficulties have led to virtually no development in much of the region's rural areas. While the lack of development has translated into relatively low living standards, the scarcity of contact with the modern-world has also meant that Christian Ethiopia's ancient culture, traditions and history have been preserved in Tigray's remote corners better than virtually anywhere else.

 

In Tigray, even the most remote and the most ancient of the churches and monasteries still function and the people in nearby villages still go about their lives much as they have for hundreds of years. " (Mitchell Kanashkevich)

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Bhutan | Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario for National Geographic

Bhutan | Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario for National Geographic | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lynsey Addario usually works in countries at war and in conflict. What was it like to cover Bhutan?

"It was much harder than covering a war, actually. I’ve spent the last seven years covering the war in Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lebanon, and Iraq. I also go to Darfur once a year. This is one of the first long-term assignments in years where no one was trying to kill me. In a war zone there is tension, you’re functioning on adrenaline, on a passion to report what is happening. It was completely different in Bhutan. Bhutan’s whole philosophy is Gross National Happiness. It’s a country that’s very peaceful; the people are very traditional. It’s not like things are unfolding before your eyes every day. My whole drive was dictated by looking for how to convey a culture, looking for light, for beauty."

 

"The culture is so different from where I usually work. In the Middle East, people call you in for lunch from the street just because you’re a foreigner. Bhutan is not like that. It’s a very closed place, although the people are incredibly hospitable and warm. They wouldn’t invite me in, but I would walk up to the houses, and most people were welcoming—that was never a problem. In one house there were these two little girls—one was maybe ten and the other seven—and their mother was working out in the fields. I walked into the house and said hello, and one of the girls just stared and started crying, because she had never seen a foreigner. She was so confused. I did get to photograph them. I went back the next morning, and the mom was there. I think the dad was out shopping, which takes a few days since the nearest road was about a six-hour walk."

 

More information :

National geographics :
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/bhutan/larmer-text

Addario's field-notes:
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/bhutan/addario-field-notes

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Cuba | Photographer: Eric Kruszewski

Cuba | Photographer: Eric Kruszewski | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Eric Kruszewski, award-winning photojournalist, shares captured stories from around the world.

 

Eric Kruszewski's Cuba gallery made me yearn to revisit Cuba having been there on a week's photo workshop over 10 years ago.  It's heaven for street photographers...Just look at the photograph above, and see how he compartmentalized the scene using the columns and the scaffoldings.

 

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Myanmar, Inle Lake | Photographer: Ruben Vicente

Myanmar, Inle Lake  | Photographer: Ruben Vicente | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ruben Vicente has just published an excellent ebook titled Myanmar: A Journey Through Time of his photographs, along with cogent and well written travel photography advice for this wonderful country, just emerging from a state of military dictatorship. I know there's a rush of travelers and photographers to Myanamr (Burma)...so do yourself a real favor, buy Ruben's ebook and drop Lonely Planet and the like.

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Ruben Vicente's comment, August 8, 2012 3:40 AM
Thank you for the shout-out =)
Photo report's comment, August 8, 2012 7:43 AM
@Ruben Vicente : you are welcome Rubens, your work is really amazing. The people have to see your travel photographs. :)
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Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein

Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“For the past six years I’ve been making photographs of the children living at St. Mary Kevin Orphanage in Uganda. These kids have lost one or both parents to disease or civil war. I founded a not-for-profit organization called Change the Truth shortly after my first visit in 2006. Since then, these children have become part of my extended family. I spend most of the year raising funds to help provide food, medical care and school fees for them. Without assistance, their futures would be dim. Once a year I return to the orphanage to spend time with them and make pictures. This past December I ventured outside the walls of the orphanage to meet and photograph some of the people living in the surrounding village."

 

"The warm, generous Ugandans I have met along the way love having their picture taken; in some cases my pictures have been the first they have ever seen of themselves. The children at the orphanage and in the village feel that because I share my photographs with so many once I return to America, they are surely quite famous! They also know that the photographs I make give them a voice they might not otherwise have; this voice leads to a raising of awareness about their plight and a positive change in their lives.”

- Gloria Baker Feinstein

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Himalaya, the child monks | Travel photographer: Thierry Falise

Himalaya, the child monks | Travel photographer: Thierry Falise | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Boys or girls, poor orphans or kids from well-off families are sent for the rest of their lives to Buddhist monasteries perched at 3,500 meters on mountainsides.

 

Based in Bangkok, Belgian photojournalist Thierry Falise has covered South-East Asia and beyond since the late eighties, both features and news reporting (as a correspondent for Gamma photo agency and today for Bangkok-based Onasia photography agency). In 2003, TV colleague Vincent Reynaud and Falise were arrested in Laos after completing a forbidden story on a Hmong minority waiting for the return of its former American ally. Sentenced to 15 years of prison, the two reporters were released after five weeks in jail thanks to an international solidarity campaign.

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10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Bhutan | Travel photographer: Gavin Gough

Bhutan | Travel photographer: Gavin Gough | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Bhutan, Land of the Thunder Dragon, set high in the remote Himalayas, remains a land of mystery and intrigue. Rarely visited by western travellers, Bhutan maintains a society where "gross national happiness" is the measure of success. Each year, festivals (tsechus) steeped in tradition take place in Bhutan's temples where monks wear animal masks and dance, whirling around the temple courtyards in a ritual as old as the surrounding mountains. Bhutan is one of few remaining places on earth where the visitor can truly feel that they have stepped back in time.

Photo report's insight:

Gavin Gough is an independent, freelance editorial and travel photographer. Originally from England, Gavin is currently based in Bangkok, Thailand, from where he travels extensively, working on assignment, on commission, creating stock images, writing and teaching.

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FOTOGRAFISKTIDENDE's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:00 AM

Bhutan ligger langt væk og det koster penge at fotografere der. Ville jeg gerne dertil ? Yes, sir !

Soňa Sklenárová's curator insight, October 6, 2014 8:10 AM

místo, kde zapomenete na čas... 

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Des yeux qui en disent long | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Des yeux qui en disent long | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Le paysan au turban vermeil était adossé à l’ombre d’un mur jaune œuf, dégustant sonmasala tea. Il était 12h30. Je demandais à mon chauffeur de s’arrêter. Les notes de bleus, jaunes rouge et ocre m’avait singulièrement captivé. Dans mon fors intérieur, j’entrevis la possibilité d’un portrait très vivant et lorsque je vis ces yeux brillants, je pensais qu’il y avait là, une histoire intérieur à saisir. Mais avant de l’importuner, pour commencer une conversation en douceur, j’ai commandé moi aussi un masala tea et j’ai profité de ce havre de paix lénifiant et silencieux où l’on converse par le regard.

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Diwali 2012: Festival of Lights | Photographer: Lloyd Young

Diwali 2012: Festival of Lights | Photographer: Lloyd Young | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Hindus worldwide recently celebrated Diwali, a five-day “festival of lights” that marks the new year and honors the principle of good over evil. One Diwali ritual is honoring Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity.
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In Search of Sufis in Gujarat | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

In Search of Sufis in Gujarat | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In Search of Sufis in Gujarat is a new gallery of 20 photographs made during my recently completed In Search of the Sufis of Gujarat Photo Expedition™. I think these photographs are reflective of my personal style, which is best described as "travel photography meets photojournalism". The gallery features traditional travel portraits, photojournalism-like photographs, and close-up/textures.

I've traveled to India about 20 times so far, and I've always been interested in, and drawn to, its multi-layered religious-cultural identities...which I now know is another term for its syncretism. As I write in one of the photo gallery's panels, Sufism "walked" into the sub-continent from Iran and Afghanistan, and wherever the Sufi acetic teachers lived and died, shrines were built to commemorate their teachings, deeds and legacy...and they eventually became saints, or pirs as they're called in the subcontinent. It is these shrines that were the intended destinations for my photo-expedition, and where we witnessed and photographed the manifestations of this religious fusion. I can't call these either extraordinary nor unusual, since they've been practiced here for millennia. It's just that I haven't been aware of this syncretism before visiting India."-Tewfic El-Sawy

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The possessed of Hazrat Ali Mira Datar | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

The possessed of Hazrat Ali Mira Datar | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Possessed of Mira Datar is about the shrine of a Sufi saint in Gujarat (India) where hundreds of Muslim and Hindu pilgrims come every day. The belief that this saint can rid people of evil spirits, and other assorted maladies, has continued undiminished for over 600 years. Stories of possessed pilgrims being cured by vomiting snakes, scorpions and nails are circulated by the religious keepers of the shrine, to maintain their status and financial gains."

-Tewfic El-Sawy

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L'Afrique | Photographer: Jonathan May

L'Afrique | Photographer: Jonathan May | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jonathan May is an advertising and fine art photographer originally from Australia. He is currently based in Moscow but lately finds himself spending majority of his time shooting in Australia and Africa.

His project L’Afrique materialized from an assignment in Africa from a French client. The project includes images from from Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast and Kenya but Jonathan plans more visits to West Africa/Francophone speaking countries in the future.

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Shibuya | Photographer: Adam Hinton

Shibuya | Photographer: Adam Hinton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"At the beginning of the year I visited Tokyo to work on a small project of portraits of commuters. Little did I know about the terrible events that would befall Japan two months later. The idea was to produce a series of observations of people going to work en mass but with each individual also reflecting on their own personal world, catching moments where the subject is both present and absent. It's a bit different for me in that it has no political comment but I felt the need to free myself from this for a change. I arrived on the 'Coming of Age Day' when those who have reached the age of 18 receive gifts at the local town halls. These are where the kimono portraits were taken." (Adam Hinton)

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Ludruk | Photographer: Diego Verges

Ludruk | Photographer: Diego Verges | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ludruk is a theatrical genres of East Java in Indonesia. It's a form of traditional performance presented by a troupe of actors on a stage, re-telling the life stories of everyday people and their struggles.

 

Most of the characters were performed by male actors who take the roles of women, but more recently, the sketches and farces feature mostly contemporary domestic stories, and have become commercial entertainment popular with urban and rural working-class audiences. 

 

Diego Verges has produced a comprehensive photo essay on the Ludruk and as well as environmental portraits and scenes of these performers. Ludruk is a must-see for my readers as it merges portraiture, documentary and travel-ethnography photography, and also visually documents an art for that could well vanish in the years to come.  udiences

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Theyyam performers | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

Theyyam performers  | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I've added a couple of galleries to my recently published website:www.telsawy.com. One of the galleries groups photographs of The Sufis, while the other has a grouping of Theyyam performers.

Red is the color of fire and blood, and associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, courage, desire, and love. And it's used in many religious rituals and festivals in India, and worn by religious practitioners such as the Theyyam of Northern Malabar and theVellichapads (or Oracles) of Kodunggallur.

Theyyam is a living cult with several thousand-year-old traditions, rituals and customs, it includes many of the castes and classes of the Hindu religion in the Malabar region. The word Theyyam is a corrupt form of Devam or God. People of the region consider Theyyam itself as a god and seek blessings from them. 


As for the Oracles of Kodungallur, they celebrate both Kali and Shiva at an intense festival that lasts about a week.In their thousands, these red-clad devotees perform self mortification acts by banging on their heads with ceremonial swords repeatedly until blood trickle down their foreheads, and daub the wounds with turmeric. A photo essay titled Agony & Ecstasydocuments the Oracles religious event. 

And yes, I do like the color red." (Tewfic El-Sawy)

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Voodoo | Photographer Dan Kitwood.

Voodoo | Photographer Dan Kitwood. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The little known nation of Benin is tiny by African standards, sat in the gulf of Guinea hemmed in by the might of Nigeria on its Eastern flank and Togo to the West, with the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean lapping along its palm fringed beaches. This former French colony is rich in colonial history; home to the “Slave Coast” of Ouidah, and the spiritual birthplace of Voodoo.

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