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For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay

For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Fortune Cookie was researched over the course of two years and created with more than one hundred and sixty hours of meticulous retouching in collaboration with Visual Box. Styling was done by Pascal & Jérémie. In this magical realm, the imaginative mind runs free, suspending rational thought if only for a moment. 

Photo report's insight:

To see Fortune Cookie  : Click on "Fashion" button, then "Editorial" and "Fortune Cookie"

 

Gear: Canon 5D MARK II

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Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige

Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Christina is a graduate of the International Center of Photography's program in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism. She was chosen as one of Photo District News's 30 Emerging Photographers for 2008, where she was described as finding "grace and bits of humor swirling in the maelstrom of everyday life." Before becoming a photographer, she worked as a clinical social worker with Spanish-speaking communities in California and Massachusetts. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

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Street photography | Photographer: Justin Sainsbury

Street photography | Photographer: Justin Sainsbury | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I was born in 1971 in Brighton, on the south coast of England. Taking pictures is one thing I have stuck at. It’s the occasional surprise; either in the picture or circumstance I find myself part of, which keeps me wandering.

I try not to have an agenda but seem to be drawn to the psychology of a situation- this often seems to involve a relationship of some sort, either between people or their environment. I do enjoy the fun stuff, but it’s the pictures that raise questions or might have different interpretations that really interest me. To me, it’s the business of discovering latent fictional stories in everyday situations. - Justin Sainsbury

 
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Theatrical | Photographer: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Theatrical | Photographer: Philip-Lorca diCorcia | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

DiCorcia alternates between informal snapshots and iconic quality staged compositions that often have a baroque theatricality.

Using a carefully planned staging, he takes everyday occurrences beyond the realm of banality, trying to inspire in his picture's spectators an awareness of the psychology and emotion contained in real-life situations. His work could be described as documentary photography mixed with the fictional world of cinema and advertising, which creates a powerful link between reality, fantasy and desire.

 

During the late 1970s, during diCorcia's early career, he used to situate his friends and family within fictional interior tableaus, that would make the viewer think that the pictures were spontaneous shots of someone's everyday life, when they were in fact carefully staged and planned in beforehand. He would later start photographing random people in urban spaces all around the world. When in Berlin, Calcutta, Hollywood, New York, Rome and Tokyo, he would often hide lights in the pavement, which would illuminate a random subject in a special way, often isolating them from the other people in the street.

His photographs would then give a sense of heightened drama to the passers-by accidental poses, unintended movements and insignificant facial expressions.

 

Even if sometimes the subject appears to be completely detached to the world around him, diCorcia has often used the city of the subject's name as the title of the photo, placing the passers-by back into the city's anonymity.Each of his series, Hustlers, Streetwork, Heads, A Storybook Life, and Lucky Thirteen, can be considered progressive explorations of diCorcia’s formal and conceptual fields of interest. Besides his family, associates and random people he has also photographed personas already theatrically enlarged by their life choices, such as the pole dancers in his latest series.

 

Photo report's insight:

Philip-Lorca diCorcia  is an American photographer. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Afterwards diCorcia attended Yale University where he received a Master of Fine Arts in Photography in 1979. He now lives and works in New York, and teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

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Street photography | Photographer: Nils Jorgensen

Street photography | Photographer: Nils Jorgensen | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Nils Jorgensen is an Denmark street photographer. Member of street photography collective In-Public.

 

London-based photographer Nils Jorgensen has an instinct for low-key, often overlooked beauty. Poetry has been an important influence on him. He picks out the work of Philip Larkin in particular, and it is easy to see how Larkin’s understated lyricism and fascination with ordinary things is paralleled in Jorgensen’s photographic style.

Jorgensen makes his living as a news and celebrity photographer, but in his life as a street photographer, he could not be any less like a member of the paparazzi. “Working full time covering news, celebrities, meeting deadlines and so forth can make it hard to switch back to taking photographs of small random moments which have no obvious news or commercial significance”, he admits. “It requires a different way of thinking and working.  But it’s what I’ve always done and it’s very important to me.  The truth is I don’t really want to disturb the flow of life around me. I much prefer waiting and hoping for something to happen. It’s also much simpler. For me the whole point of photography is not to interfere with what is happening, or might be about to happen.”

Jorgensen has shown and published his work internationally and is part of the street photography collective In-Public (http://www.in-public.com/NilsJorgensen/gallery/61). This photograph was included in the Thames and Hudson book Street Photography Now.


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From the Island | Jiří Makovec

From the Island | Jiří Makovec | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Using a Hasselblad and lots of film, Jiri has managed to capture the city in a truly unique and surprising way.

 

Jiri Makovec lives and works in New York. His work has been exhibited at the International Center of Photography, Phillips de Pury & Company Auctions’ Change of Art and All Grown Up, the ChobiMela International Festival of Photography in Bangladesh, and the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts in Japan. Of this work, Tales From The island, he writes, ‘Within the city’s rigid grid, moments of mystery and terror unveil, and are captured as a series of encounters and events. Whether the viewer is facing truth or fiction, this body of work shows the photographers’ relationship to the city, that is also known as “the arena for the terminal stage of Western civilization”‘ (R. Koolhaas).

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Street Photography | Photographer : Nick Turpin

Street Photography | Photographer : Nick Turpin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
'Street Photography' is the simplest form but also the hardest challenge in Photography which is why I keep returning to it. This is the site of London Street Photographer Nick Turpin.

 

There is something about the making of photographs in public places that resonates with me more than any other kind of photography. I think it simply suits my personality.

 

It’s nice, when taking pictures in the street, not to have to participate in any way in the stream of life passing you by. It makes me feel special to be there but not to be chatting, not to be shopping or not even to be heading for somewhere else. I feel like I am invisible to the passing crowds. This in turn leads to a loss of my sense of self, which is the finest feeling of all.

 

Having worked for several years both in newspapers and advertising, I am fascinated by the things that I ‘choose’ to photograph when I leave the house with my camera but without a ‘story’ or ‘brief’ to fulfill. These ‘choices’ are revealing,in some way, of who I am.

 

I go to the busiest, public places to discover something very personal and private. It is an inescapable truth that the resulting photographs are as much about my inner state as they are about the external world they were made in. They are all self-portraits.

It is important to me that my personal pictures don’t have to ‘do’ anything. They don’t have to sell in a gallery or sit well beside the ads in a magazine. I don’t have to make pictures that are easily categorised. They are not reportage, there is no subject, they are not art, there is no great technical craft or aesthetic beauty. They are just pictures about life. For these reasons, Picture Editors, Art Directors and Curators don’t know what to do with them, where to put them. I like that.

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Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There is an undeniable nucleus of initial interest, a question that from the occidental perspective is easy to think about. How does a society really live, each of its members, in a human and social organization which is apparently exemplary and with an enviable lifestyle? There is a feeling that despite enjoying all the comforts of a modern society, the inhabitants of Tokyo are far away from what was, conventionally, understood as an ideal of happiness.

It is easy to find oneself isolated and alone among a crowd. Enjoying the comfort and economic safety is not a synonym of complete personal realization. A frenetic pace of life can ruin any personal initiative and any possibility of creative life.

From this clash, I could observe a dislocation of the people of this huge metropolis, as if they did not strike a balance between feeling isolated and alone among the crowd.

To sum up, the paradox was solved in a manifestation of solitude, in a great distress, in a sensation of individual frustration. Was that possible to detect and turn it into images? A difficulty due to the fact that I had to face up a perception of a completely subjective and debatable reality. It is not easy to show the breathlessness of the Taboo, the passive attitude or the nightmare of routine.—Salvi Danes

Photo report's insight:

Salvi Danes is a Spanish photographer based in Barcelona, Spain. His work has been honored by the Lucie Foundation, Sony World Photography, IPA, and many others. This work is from his series, Dark Isolation: Tokyo.

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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz

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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:53 AM

Another very good set of street photography

Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 4:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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Street photography | Photographer: Frédéric Le Mauff

I’m in my late 30’s and live in Lyon, France.

I lived my first 20 years far away from any crowded life. However, when I moved in a big city, I immediately enjoyed wandering the streets for hours.

By a combination of circumstances, I laid a hand on a camera. It was in 2006. I then dabbled in photography for a while, and some years later I figured out that it was possible to wander the streets and take pictures. I still remember my very first candid shot at a close distance. It was on December 2, 2008. Since then, I am trying to shoot street photography.

I have no moral consideration, no mission, no defined project. I’m not documenting anything. I only try to put in images my fascination for strangers.- 

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The Magical Streets Of Raghu Rai's India | Photographer: Raghu Rai

The Magical Streets Of Raghu Rai's India | Photographer: Raghu Rai | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

When I go to a situation, I see something interesting, and I see the enormity and the size of it, and the complexity of it, and I say “Yes God, you’ve shown me this but it’s not enough for me.” So he says “Alright.” Then I keep walking, then he shows me something more complex and bigger. I say “Yes God, It’s nice. But it’s still not enough for me.” So I go on and on and I don’t accept it, and then he knows this child of his is very demanding and restless. And then he opens up and shows me something I have never experienced before. Then I take a picture and say “Thank you God.”


Indian Photographer Raghu Rai is one of those rare photographers who never left home, choosing to focus his lens decisively on his motherland since the early 1960′s, a decision that has seen him document the changing socialscape and history of India over 4 decades, from the Sadhus of Kumbh Mela to Mrs Gandhi and Mother Teresa to the victims of Bhopal.

 

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Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names | Photographer: Alex Webb

Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names | Photographer: Alex Webb | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names, Magnum photographer Alex Webb displays his particular ability to distill gesture, color and contrasting cultural tensions into a single, beguiling frame. He presents a vision of Istanbul as an urban cultural center, rich with the incandescence of its past--a city of minarets and pigeons rising to the heavens during the early-morning call to Muslim prayers--yet also a city riddled with ATM machines and clothed in designer jeans.

 

Webb began photographing Istanbul in 1998, and became instantly enthralled: by the people, the layers of culture and history, the richness of street life. But what particularly drew him in was a sense of Istanbul as a border city, lying between Europe and Asia. "For 30-some years as a photographer, I have been intrigued by borders, places where cultures come together, sometimes easily, sometimes roughly." The resulting body of work, some of Webb's strongest to date, conveys the frisson of a culture in transition, yet firmly rooted in a complex history. With essay by the Nobel Prize winning novelist, Orhan Pamuk.

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Street photography | Photographer: Matt Stuart

Street photography | Photographer: Matt Stuart | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
I am not sure which came first, my being nosey or an interest in 'street photography', but a fascination with people and the way they live their lives is why I enjoy the business so much.

 

Matt Stuart, 1974, UK, is a street photographer. He uses a Leica MP to shoot his images. Matt's work is humorous and spontaneous. He does not stage or manipulate any of his photographs apart from his commercial work. Roaming the streets of London, Stuart is looking for moments, happenings where all things fall into place to make his shot. He had a show beginning of this year called Happy Accidents, which might just be the best title to describe Matt's photography. The following images come from his Colour portfolio.

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