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Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Abdul Moresey arrive to Pademba prison in 2007 as a child. He was charged  with murder. The facts are that  Abdul  went to the river  with his best friend and this was drowned. The child´s family accused Abdul  of murder and he is  four  years pending trial. Sentencing in this country is abnormally harsh, and the Sierra Leone government has pronounced that criminal responsibility begins at age ten, which is in clear conflict with the Convention for Child Rights ratified by the same government  in 1990.

Photo report's insight:

"This work was mostly shot in Pademba Road Prison where 32 children, between the years of 14 and 17, share prison life with 1,300 adults." - Fernando Moleres

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A Place To Be | Photographer: Marcus Reichmann

A Place To Be | Photographer: Marcus Reichmann | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Juli, Ivo, little Karla and baby Marla are a normal family. But they live in a place where statistics would never usually place them: four years ago, the family moved to the country and settled down on an old, dilapidated farm in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, the eastern German state which is currently suffering the most from the departure of young, educated people. 

However, the family has not made a dogma of their alternative way of living. They are neither organic farmers nor hippies, yet their new surroundings have changed their lives in that things have been decelerated. Marcus Reichmann, a photography student from Hannover, accompanied them on their quest for personal happiness. The result is a portrait of a normal young family – or a family that is anything but normal.

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Dark Clouds | Photographer: Ian Teh

Dark Clouds | Photographer: Ian Teh | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

A thick layer of grey ash covers the road leading to an industrial site. The air in the city is acrid and dense. Industrial plants and factories loom out of the haze and disappear once more as one travels beyond the city. Further into the mountains there are sounds of explosions as workers use dynamite to extract limestone for the steel plants. In another valley, not too far away, miners go deep into a pit shaft in the early hours of the morning.—Ian Teh

Photo report's insight:

London-based photographer Ian Teh describes Dark Clouds, his project investigating China’s most industrialized cities, as “an exploration of the darker side of the economy’s bright, shiny facade.” Teh follows Chinese workers in the coal industry, giving us a glimpse into the lives of those that are integral in the development of a nation, but are rarely seen or recognized.

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Microshop | Photographer: Frédéric Delangle

Microshop | Photographer: Frédéric Delangle | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

10% growth. Small traders represent 96% of the dsitribution in India. They supply nearly 300 millions consumers and represent a number of case of 300 billions of dollars. (Madras, India) 

Photo report's insight:

"Ils gagnent peu et pourtant travaillent beaucoup, ils passent entre 70 et 80 % de leur vie éveillés dans leur échoppe souvent plus petite qu’une cellule de prison. Ils sont partout en Inde et nourrissent 1,2millliard d’humains. Quand la nuit tombe, leur échoppe se transforme pour l’occasion en petit théâtre où les lumières commencent à scintiller, pareilles aux feux de la rampe qui s’allument après les trois coups qui donnent le départ de la pièce..."- Frédéric Delangle

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Suspension | Photographer: Alvaro Deprit

Suspension | Photographer: Alvaro Deprit | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This work seeks to explore the special psychological moment of adolescence traversed by foreign minors in juvenile communities and the impact of their individual experience in the passage to adulthood. For them, it is a time suspended between past and future which sees radical changes in their space; a passing phase in which tensions, reflections and life expectations are concentrated.

In Italy, each year the 'Case Famiglie' (literally 'Family Homes' – family-type communities located in residential buildings), welcome between 7,000 and 8,000 unaccompanied non-EU citizen minors from different continents – young people who have travelled thousands of kilometres, even at the risk of their lives, fleeing war, poverty and uncertainty.

They can be defined as survivors, having faced, in some cases, a voyage which in its final phase brought them to the extreme limits of their means. Now in the 'Home', they live suspended between two worlds, in time and in space; they are on hold, waiting for what will come. However, during this welcoming phase in which they have found a dimension of tranquillity, the sense of uncertainty does not come any less, as once they reach adulthood, they will again find themselves facing the external world outside the home, often without any sort of purpose.

Photo report's insight:

Camera used: Canon 5D Mark II

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Dye Transfer | Mariette Pathy Allen

Dye Transfer | Mariette Pathy Allen | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Transformations" is a portfolio of 11 portraits of crossdressers that were made in the 1980s. The portfolio was produced to coincide with the publication of "Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them", in 1989. In January, 1990, the series was exhibited at the Simon Lowinsky Gallery.

Photo report's insight:

Mariette Pathy Allen has been photographing the transgender community for over 30 years. Through her artistic practice, she has been a pioneering force in gender consciousness, contributing to numerous cultural and academic publications about gender variance and lecturing throughout the globe. Her first book "Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them" was groundbreaking in its investigation of a misunderstood community. Her second book "The Gender Frontier" is a collection of photographs, interviews, and essays covering political activism, youth, and the range of people that identify as transgender in mainland USA and won the 2004 Lambda Literary Award in the Transgender/Genderqueer category. She has also been a valuable consultant to several films about gender and sexuality.

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Midnight Blue | Photojournalist: Justin Jin

Midnight Blue | Photojournalist: Justin Jin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
In an old brick warehouse in a Chinese boomtown, workers have thousands of jeans to scrub before dawn. The machines they use — to create the vintage look — send into the air lung-clogging blue dust.
Photo report's insight:

Working more than a decade as an independent photojournalist with leading magazines and newspapers, I specialise in reaching people in hidden, harsh or sensitive situations. Whether tackling themes such as authoritarianism in Russia, exploitation in China or illegal immigration in Europe, I aim to get inside the worlds of the people involved. Through my photography and writing, I want to challenge preconceptions, expose hypocrisy and condemn abuse as much as I celebrate strength and humanity. For the last four years I've been based in Moscow, doing reportage and corporate assignments in Russia, China and beyond. Previously I lived in Amsterdam, working in Western Europe. I speak Russian, Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese, English and Dutch. Some of my projects are commissioned, while others are self-initiated. I apply the same passion, persistence and discipline to both. I also show work in galleries and museums, including the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, which collected a body of my work. In my previous job I worked as a Reuters correspondent, covering China from Beijing and managing a financial reporting bureau in Shenzhen city. Before that, I was at Cambridge University, reading Philosophy and Political Sciences. I was born in Hong Kong in 1974.

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Brothels | Photojournalist: Miguel Candela

Brothels | Photojournalist: Miguel Candela | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In July 2010, radical islamists burned down the brothel injuring two prostitutes and leaving most without anything. “We had to jump onto the river and losteverything”, recalls Hasina. “We even didn’t have clothesto wear and we were forced to live one month and a half in the open”. The attack was coordinated by middle aged men who want the prostitutes out. “They say that the women corrupt their boys and they know that their assault wouldn’t be punished by this hypocrite society”. explains Shirin Akter,an Action Aid worker, “and they know that their assaultwouldn’t be punished by this hypocrite society”.

 

Nobody was arrested and troops were deployed to protect thereconstruction of the place only after the Prostitutes’Association made a public pledge.  After countless demonstrations that stirred media interest, prostitutes now fight for their rights. They don’t have to walk barefoot when they leave the brothel anymore, and their bodies can be buried in a cemetery, though still in a separate one. Better than having their remains floating in the river covered by a sheet, anyway. But, still, sex workers’ IDs state their job and their address appears as ‘brothel’. That’s today’s fight. But the war goes to a higher ground: making prostitution legal in a country which Constitution stipulates it’s citizens’ right to choose their profession freely.

 

“Society uses us to fulfill their human needs, but treats us like animals”, criticizes Ahya Begum, 37, president of the Prostitute Association of Faridpur, which gets support from both SMS and the international NGO Action Aid. “Maybe our job is different from others, but human dignity has nothing to do with profession”, claims Begum during a public gathering in a small garage in front of Faridpur’s brothel compound. Women around her nod their heads in silence. In this kind of assembly, the girls vote and decide things such as minimum price for sex (never less than 100 taka), and minimum age to work (15). Condom use, they say, must be compulsory. It’s definitely a nice show of force, Democracy at its best, but a deceiving one as well. But customers seldom cover their penises with latex, and most prostitutes here started to work along with their first menstruation.

 

The brothel is an unlikely place for sex: a rundown concrete building where rats run free in rural Bangladesh. Small holes in the walls allow the only supply of natural light and air into the jail-like compound. Fluorescent bulbs hesitate to light up, and turn it into the ideal background for a horror blockbuster. Many boards show happy condoms trying to fight HIV with a broad smile, but the girls accept having sex without one if the customer insists. “There is no choice”, Lima says. And that’s why 70% of the girls are infected withsome kind of STD. 

 

Hasina served her first man when she was just 12. Like Lima and many others, rape was how she started. In the rigid Bengali society, shame cannot be washed. Stigma is forever. Now, she’s 40 and her price tag has fallen to a rock bottom 50 taka (70 cents.) per customer. That’s also the sum she has to pay, daily, for the rent of the bamboo hut where she works and lives.  "The situation is deteriorating. Prices for food and accommodation skyrocket, while people’s income remains stable. Those fishermen stopping by to have sex have less disposable money, and therefore we are living a crisis”.

Society has forced them to live in darkness; the lowest possible social statues. Men love them and hate them, demand their services while others tried to kill them. A contradiction which does not let them live.-Miguel Candela

Photo report's insight:

Miguel (Spain, 1985) specializes in the human drama of life – from the subtle to the extreme where humanity struggles to live off what is available, struggle against difficulties even the simple laughter brought by little to big things in life. He sees his works as an affirmation that "Every person has his or her individual unique history, every individual has an intriguing story to tell."

 

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