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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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Bhooshan à l’école publique de Jodhpur | sergebouvet.com

Bhooshan à l’école publique de Jodhpur | sergebouvet.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Un drôle d’élève, ce Bhooshan ! C’était le seul écolier à porter un léger blouson bleu, rouge et moutarde alors que le thermomètre affichait 25°. Je le visais avec mon 50mm, dans sa salle de classe modeste, courbé en deux sur son cahier, soufflant, tirant la langue, tenant son stylo bille à pleines mains et appuyant de toutes ses forces, comme s’il eût voulu traverser la table…

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Just Write | Photojpournalist: Steve McCurry

Just Write | Photojpournalist: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Steve McCurry has covered many areas of international and civil conflict, including Beirut, Cambodia, the Philippines, the Gulf War, the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, and Tibet. He focuses on the human consequences of war, not only showing what war impresses on the landscape, but rather, on the human face.

 

McCurry's work has been featured in every major magazine in the world and frequently appears in National Geographic, with recent articles on Tibet, Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen, and the temples of Angkor Wat, Cambodia.

 

A high point in McCurry's career was the rediscovery of the previously unidentified Afghan refugee girl that many have described as the most recognizable photograph in the world today.

McCurry has published books including The Imperial Way (1985), Monsoon(1988), Portraits (1999), South Southeast (2000), Sanctuary (2002), The Path to Buddha: A Tibetan Pilgrimage (2003), Steve McCurry (2005), and Looking East(2006).

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2002: The Year they Were Born | Photographer Garima Jain

2002: The Year they Were Born | Photographer Garima Jain | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"We have lived here for eight years, on this side of the road we call ‘Border’. We cross to the Hindu side only to buy vegetables. Recently, Hindus and Muslims threw stones at each other across the Border during a wedding. I know what a Hindu looks like because they wear a bindi and tika. The only time we meet them is when we go with father to the factory where he works. It’s in the Hindu area..."

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