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Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Syrian refugees are held by the Jordanians for questions regarding their identities at an unofficial crossing point at the border between Syria and Jordan at Sharjarh, Jordan, April 10, 2013. Thousands of Syirans are crossing into Jordan each day across unofficial border points between the two countries, as Syrians flee ongoing fighting in their country. The United Nations estimates that the number of Syrian refugees is currently over one million, most of whom are living in neighboring countries, straining the resources of host countries."- Lynsey Addario

Photo report's insight:

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, where she works for National Geographic, the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine,Fortune, and other publications. She was born on November 13, 1973, in Norwalk, Connecticut.

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Cole Larson's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:09 AM

Well Syria shot themselves in the foot on that one. Three things why their "president" (Dictator) is not very good. 1. He is very power hungry and selfish. 2. He uses CHEMICAL weapons on HIS OWN PEOPLE yeah the people are sure going to vote for you on relection day. 3. He is very inmature and is in no shape to run a country or even his own life. Back to the refuges I think that yes there will be a lot of them, but at least they won't be a open target in their own houses anymore. Jordan please take these people in as your own. They have a bad leader who seems like hurting the people who build your coiuntry is okay.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:07 PM

Provides further insight on the migration of many Syrian refugees (UN estimates there are over 1 million) who are constantly on the move for they are being threatened/unable to return home/are in no-man's-land stuck in between Jordan and Syria, etc. 

- UNIT 2

Kyle Rutherford's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:38 PM

The Syrian refugees were influenced by a major push factor: war. Refugees are people who are forced to migrate from their home country and cannot return for fear of persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a social group, or political opinion. They hope to seek asylum in Jordan until war in their home country ceases but Jordan is running out of supplies to support these refugees.

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The chechen refugees | Photographer: Gianni Giosue

The chechen refugees | Photographer: Gianni Giosue | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

My project wants to document the daily lives of the Chechen refugees living in the Pankisi Valley, Republic of Georgia. They came to Georgia about 12 years ago following the wars that ravaged the Republic of Chechnya in 1994-96 and 1999-2000. 

Ever since they have been trying to relocate to a third country or to start a new life. Some of them managed to be relocated to Northern America or to some European states. 

Some others stayed behind and were left in a legal limbo. It takes about 10 years to be able to qualify for Georgian citizenship. Some of them still have no documents: as a consequence it is difficult to be integrated, find a job and live a normal life.- Gianni Giosue

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Patras | Photographer: Enri Canaj

Patras | Photographer: Enri Canaj | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In the port city of Patras, there are hundreds of immigrants who were deliberately denied the slightest assistance (housing, food, medical care, freedom of movement) -even those that have already been legally recognized as refugees.

Most of them have fled conflicts in Darfur, Afghanistan and Syria, and when they saw the squalid living conditions in Greece, they tried to continue their journey to other countries of the European Union, risking their lives again.

 

Trucks transporting goods between Italy and Greece are the only way to access the ferry linking the two sides. The increasing militarization of Greek ports forces immigrants and asylum seekers to improvise the most unlikely and risky maneuvers in order to hide in the basement of a truck.

These people have left their countries thinking that Greece would be a short station in their trip to Italy, France or Germany. But, six years have gone and they still remain in Patras, living all together in an abandoned factory next to the port... - Enri Canaj



Photo report's insight:

Enri was born in Tirana, Albania in 1980. In 2003 he graduated from Leica Photographic Academy. He worked as an advertising photography assistant while pursuing his own projects .

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